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Nabbed my 2014 diesel window wagon June 11th 2015.

I’d haunted both Freightliner Sprinter & all the Twin Cities Dodge/Ram dealers for over a year when Justin at Dodge of Burnsville, MN made me a godfather-type ‘offer I couldn’t refuse’. Earlier I’d surfed the black hole, err buying event horizon of a sweet new 2012 Sprinter crew van with 5500 miles on it and escaped only by running and screaming like a little girl, err… spinning on my heels outside the dealers GM’s office and walking away, and when visiting Ford I had a diesel Transit give me motion sickness within 60 seconds of its engine starting that saw me stumble straight away from too.

Anyhow, I’d talked to Justin and outlined historically what it had taken to get me to purchase my now 17-year-old F150… 25% off sticker and don’t shame me on my trade-ins, and I wanted a window van that beyond all the other reasons the random LEO’s across North America could see my smiling face easier when they were choosing how to ‘do the dance’ with a vehicle they were interested in…

Six weeks later in the automotive section of both Twin Cities newspapers there was an ad for two 159”WB diesel window wagons for $10k off MSRP each. It took a couple of weeks to get the mind set right to flush out the ’99 F-150, ’97 Accord and ’01 Odyssey infesting the driveway and was greeted with 50(!) Promasters lounging on Burnsvilles lot when next I visited.

We test drove both diesel window vans and chose the smoothest riding one – whether lot rot had flattened tires and/or the new vehicle delivery system had sprung something with too tight tie-downs or both were a little off ‘from the factory’ the one I bought still has some front end hop between 40 and 50mph, that will be a separate post if/when they look into it.

So I wrote a check for $500 to hold the unit, returned a couple of days later and to finish the deal. We qualified for the ‘business partner’ bonus after I pointed out the offer had fine print explaining rebate had to occur at the point of sale and the minor miracle of them finding my companies’ name listed in a Minnesota dot gov site, and the business manager agreed the IRS frowned on frivolous tax ID numbers as they are to be granted only if a hobby business turns profit 3 of 5 years.

The $500 in MOPAR accessories went into front and rear mud flaps, side/rear grab bars and a cold weather radiator cover bonnet. I still don’t really understand the complete offer but since they were ‘free’ and I’m now granted 20% discount on parts for life I’m really happy with them, the back grab bars especially are a pleasure to use.

My first missing-option upgrade using the 20% discount got an OEM Hitch & wiring set that had me pay exactly $125 w/ tax above the factory option, surely worth double that for the pleasure of doing it myself. I think the factory equipment is absolutely worth it. They ordered in the trailer wiring and only later I discovered the best part has an AC number suffix, meaning it has provisions for an electric brake controller, keep that in mind if/when ordering or have you’ve found a MOPAR harness aftermarket as the AA or AB parts do not include the wire in the bundle.

The OEM hitch & hardware weighed in at 68-pounds, the bumper beam it replaced weighed 18 pounds so it’s a 50-pound weight gain. The harness bundle kit w/ module, fasteners and 4/7 pin sockets add 4-1/4 pounds. The install for the hitch was effortless – had to belly-laugh when the spring-steel-wire dragged the carriage bolt(s) through the hollow frame beams to a no-access lug in all of 5 seconds each. The trailer harness cables are to be run above the drivers’ door and behind the dash to reach their hook-ups, that installation will be done later so I can run additional wires and cables at the same time, plus while I have the trim and liners off I’ll really open it up and install sound-proofing mats & foam etc..

The mud flaps? After studying the tubs I decided I needed to protect the wheel wells with undercoating before mounting, plus black-out the white… I tried 3M spray undercoating on the front and stopped after covering just the area involved with the mud flaps to get something more durable. Enter one quart of Herculiner brush-on bed liner ($28) thickened with the ceramic insulating beads that I stretched to barely cover both rear tubs for two coats. I’ll need to get another quart to get a thick and even coat over that much area. But the mud flaps are on, straight and sturdy, yippee…
 

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Today I include a photo of my wagon's window sticker, a picture is worth a thousand words...

During small talk on the delivery date I refused my wise and kind salesman’s suggestion to buy an after-market floor. Maybe not the brightest idea since fasteners and materials are spec’d out so everything is turn-key to have a good floor, but I’d decided to DIY it while daydreaming some years back so this time I guess some karma needed balancing out...

While planning the floor I was counting on leftover materials from my 1973 27’ Airstream perpetual restoration project, I have a storage shelter to hold interior pieces and lumber, etc., so my first look in there for leftover 125-foot roll of 5mm foil-foam-foil ‘Prodex’ insulation I’d used on the trailer… and found a squirrel had joined the choir invisible while lounging on the end of the roll while nearby there was the smoking gun of quart cans of xylene & denatured alcohol with the spouts chewed off.

Having a squirrel go to fur and bones zombie on top of 500 square feet of shiny reflective insulation is a very bad thing. Know zombies have an aroma undertone of old-world death but it’s the rancid deep-fryer fat neither germ, bug nor rodent can digest is what will follow you around for days. This event hurt my feelings, I was pouting for days like a five year-old, plus deep-fried foods are off the menu for a long time.

I declined to spend the $300 replacement cost so salvaged just enough blemish-free Prodex to fill the gaps in the cargo area steel floor ribs. The trash truck got 475~ sqft of insulation, my quickie cardboard workbench, fence picket straight edge, safety razor blade and the clothes I wore. The resurrected insulation got chlorine scrubbed; ****’n Span mopped and finished by a day in full sun before cutting and fitting. 3m spray adhesive tacked them down. Don’t tell anyone my troubles.

Exit $60 a sheet for three sheets of ½” MDO sign-makers plywood and another $50 for Insl-x Stix bonding paint, cut flooring to fit and two coats of paint on every surface – then two coats of insulating bead infused Stix bonding paint on the bottom.

Enter the 5x10 sheet of 0.060” EPDM roofing membrane pilfered from a roofers’ truck a few years back: using 3m spray adhesive I bonded panels of rubber to the two rear panels of plywood flooring plywood to sandwich the rubber between steel floor and wood. I changed from rubber to 0.063” silicone glommed onto eons ago for above the muffler, the first 30-inches behind the drivers seat, just in case that area ever gets a touch of grass fire or something else that would smoke vulcanized rubber. That silicone remains un-glued to be able to pull that section (not that anything would ever stick to it) and tie-in a crew bench seat or a pair of captains chairs in the future.

I tacked flooring in place with 1/4" self-taping screws placed to pierce into the hidden frame rail cavities and used six or eight 5/16” grain elevator conveyor belt bolts on every sheet, at the back door edge and on lateral seams to better trap the panel down if in an accident or caught by a forklift/pallet someday.

Eventually the floor will be 99.9% sealed against water with all seams/edges caulked and all screws filled, it’s just too easy to have a door open in a thunderstorm or condensation to have all winter to collect – I’ve seen/heard too many horror stories about wood warp, mold and rot.

Next is sound control, after that I’ve not got a clue – getting serious cold feet about committing to doing permanent structures in the cargo area …
 

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Yeah, there's something about gazing at that gorgeous uninterrupted surface that makes the next step a bit rough. :|

Looking good so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Still planning & accumulating.

Luxuries! Went with 40-pound box B-Grade SecondSkin dampifier, with shipping $280. Ouch – but budgeted for. Box arrived on 7th day so cheapest shipping option is actually via UPS Groundsloth.

Box weighed 2 pounds plus 46 pounds of mat. Very few actual defects, mostly odd lengths and about 30% of pieces with an inch or two trimmed off width.

Plastic $1.75 wallpaper roller failed so added 20¢ E-clip to hold roller on shaft. The roller got used less and less except for flattening pieces right before peeling the backing paper & applying.

I found using parts of the Harbor Freight auto trim panel pry tool set as squeegees http://tinyurl.com/6t6o2qb works very well for following contours, wedging down ripples and beveling down edges even when buried out of sight. They increase leverage and keep fingertips away from sharp aluminum edges. The rounded knuckles chase inside corners well too. Since they also work to pry apart the interior and remove push-plug fasteners to reach the place to apply the mat its a slam-dunk. Also skip the razor cutter and go with large scissors with long complete cuts, no hacking at corners etc. or you'll bleed a lot.

First job was wheel well tubs; economizing covering those huge drums saw filling each spoke hollow of the reinforcing ribs. Since the wells are mirror images front to back then left-well to right-well, using blank newsprint sheet made easy patterns, label template front & back as A/B and cut two damping pieces each of A/B, do that six or seven times and it’s done. I’ll probably double up / completely cover the vertical part if there is enough left over when I get to a good stopping point.

Did 100% of the wheel wells ‘almost hidden outside clamshells’ that quarter panels joins to; at 70mph w/ just the inners matted the outer area sounded like an AM radio off-station at full volume. Probably a 3” ribbon along the exterior skin where they attach to will be done later with leftovers.

Next were the back doors – think large drum skins for the cargo area tube… so am investing lots of the sound mat. As an experiment I did the top of one and bottom of the other to see what paid off the best. So - 12”x30” chunk for above the window vs. about the same or a little more spread out checkerboard style on the ‘ringing’ sections below the window on the other door – the high treated one stopped the gong-effect on slamming 90% and hushed top corner (wind?) noise at speed nicely; the lower panel treated door still rings like a bell on closing but has near zero sympathy reverb from rough roads plus blocks traffic and outside noise very well.

Opinion: take the time to do the complete coverage on body skin in the door cavity above window and invest a minimum of an equal amount, heavier on latch side, below the Windows. I kept cutting scraps and using just one more whole piece until I’d covered ALL five sides with 65-70% coverage, including as far up the window frame hollows as a tool could reach, scrap pieces on the stamped hanging edges – justified as they now will make better speaker boxes sometime in the future and they are likely the only part of the interior to remain stock or near stock, no built-ins or shelves will cover them.

I added foam blocks left over from a roll of pickup truck topper gasket material to the back of the molded plastic license plate holder, and added a chunk of dampifier to the back of the license plate itself, they’ve gone to a paper thin flat aluminum plate that rattled. And the doors now close w/ a Lexus quietness & quench most road noise.

Materials used & Cost? I went by weight, this ‘B’ stock had a mix of Dampifier 1mm thick .35lb sqft or the ‘Pro’ 2mm thick .60lb sqft… and I didn’t keep track as chunks went in. I mixed in a bunch of Pro in the wheel-wells segments where it was noisiest and used none in the rear doors. I have 26 of the 46 pounds remaining. Money wise $120, or about $30 for each door and wheel tub adjusting for the thicker pro mixed in.

Next up is the slider door, and waiting on 11mm hex-bodied riv-nut inserts – I found a Marson 325 thread-setter w/ all nine nose (English/metric) pieces for $180 off craigslist but could not find the inserts in bulk except from China…

– Anyone got a good source for metric round thread-sert ~ riv-nut inserts to fit all the varying stamped holes throughout the cargo bay?

– Anyone got a good source for the snap-in square threaded insert lugs so bountiful in the cargo bay?

And yes, just saying ‘dealer items’ would be considered anti-social & brown-nosing in the 3rd degree.


 

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So today its installing checker board sound damping mat into slider door … and catching up with posts here…


Nabbed a three-place Sprinter bench seat with 3-point harness seat belts, had everything aligned and was thirty seconds from drilling anchor lug holes when we suddenly went selfish with the floor space and voted the seat back onto Craigslist.

Gorgeous bench seat and comfortable (Available if you’re near the Twin Cities MN) but we just don't have that great of a need to seat five in the van so it's back to looking for a two-place bench w/ shoulder belts.


Or perhaps we’ll just use seats I collected earlier, two leather recliners from a Dassault Falcon business jet somejoe somewhen glommed onto when sales broker upgraded a corporate jet with a couch seat. These are high grade leather with lap belts, clockwork quality swivels & sliders & retracting armrests, though will have to fabricate pedestals once layout is decided.
 

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Installed MOPAR slider door B-pillar grab bar (KNOB KIT-INTERIOR - Mopar (82214304)); very easy install and only comment is go *very slow RPMs* with the 3/4" hole saw and keep pilot bit keyed true to the template using backing board well taped to the liner, the plastics Fiat use melt and deform easier than I remember US sourced automotive liners so we had to spend time with razor blade removing a cone/tube of smeared plastic, and had a little off-center wander even with the backer board. Since this kit was a bonus using the commercial partner gimmick at the point of purchase I'm overjoyed with it, I think my 'price' was $100.


Added sound damping throughout the door pillar anywhere there was single layer sheet metal accessible. The last area to get covered was the heavy plate spider stamping backing up the passenger door latch so all in all about 60% of the 'ring' of opening and closing has been damped; the rest of the gong-ringing may be in the doors themselves.


Installed the upfitter rear speaker circuits… used 16/2 direct burial UV-proof stranded wire since it is well armored and I have 500' on hand. Used Polyken Foilmastic (high temp foil tape) to bind wire bundle up the door pillar walls and wrap new wires on to the existing flex conduit. Ordered 100°C wiring harness wrap tape & a 'Fleece' tape to wrap hanging wires with, really wanted to use a very light weight self-adhesive Velcro loop tape without reinforced backing like they did on the wiring inside the back doors but not worth the effort and price hunting it down. Also laying out that 16/2 for LED lighting circuits and switch legs - but these will be sourced from behind driver’s seat.


(7) Mouser Part #: 571-606201: tinned Brass male crimp pin
(1) Mouser Part #: 571-14807040: Plug Housing (Male) 6 Position
With shipping: order total: $6.64 Mouser.com


Studied the Italian 50 Amp upfitter panel battery connection -- might be very nice to insert a battery selector switch by duplicating the OEM plug right next to the one provided to keep ‘plug and play fall back’ into original PM wiring if the mission changes. Yes, there enough slack in the provided cable to remove the Italian plug and go to some US design but the provided socket is very well designed. So parts required would be one male plug and one male/female set, even shipped from Italy that's $15 or $20 USD if I'd get a few of them to share the shipping, cheaper than Anderson power plugs unless you catch a deal from a wholesaler. Dunno, to be determined...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After working with 50-year-old Airstreams with 1400 rivets piercing the skin and all sorts of surprises leaping out with every new task the PM is a delight to work on. One thing I recommend is compartmentalizing insulation into sealed zones, there can be condensing temperatures on the shaded side and the sun-heated side forcing drafts that place some areas into relative perpetual dampness – especially if the vehicle is parked for weeks at a time.

Ordered insulation… http://www.homedepot.com/p/202710039

‘Ultratouch Denim Insulation Hot Water Heater Blanket’ is a two-inch thick batt except it is provided in a single 48”x75” sheet AND it has aluminized reflective barrier attached.

The water heater blanket costs $28 for 25 square feet, plus Home Depot offers an unfaced 2” batt in 16”x48” rolls ‘Denim Insulation Multi-Purpose Roll (6-Pack)’ with 32 square feet for $36.

So, $158 & free shipping I have 100sqft of faced and 32sqft of unfaced to arrive soon, and it’s likely destined for below the window lines and inside the slider/back doors...


More details to follow...
 

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Last update post was four months ago... Here are some random important tidbits to report.

A ginormous cargo space sure shrinks after a few days on the road. I am charting what storage spaces are needed for baggage plus staples needed to van camp painlessly. That painless part is the catch, sorting through bins/boxes/bags of jumbles of stuff and the inevitable repacking drift of items proper homes gets worse every day on the road, sure takes the joy out of a quick stop or jumping back into the van for ‘one’ item.

8400 miles on the PM to date, 7200 miles done in three road trips, one trip with temperatures above 100°F and one trip well below freezing weather and slept okay if I was picky about where and when...

Cold weather sleeping? – I’m planning a nice bed for sure since nesting on a 4" foam mattress on the floor is for the birds, though goose down does help. Anyone have any input on latex mattresses in cold weather?

I've completed the first layer of insulation, 3/4" Iso insulation went up on the interior roof panels – locked up with a mix of 3m 90 spray adhesive, some Loctite PL 8x premium and gunned great-stuff minimum-expansion foam to hold the boards up - then used great-stuff min-exp foam to gasket them in. Ought to last half of forever, and tried to seal air draft leaks mingling with insulated spaces as I went from the ceiling ribs & wall columns to reduce condensation in hidden spaces while the van is occupied and/or cooking in cold weather – that’s not a mechanical problem but one of avoiding or delaying mold/mildew taking hold.

Gently pre-bent the roof panels to form the exact arc of the roof sheet metal so they’re not spring loaded to try and pop off. The stiffening corrugation hollows under the roof were filled in with Prodex ¼” foil-foam-foil insulation, including underneath all the support ribs, that part was just cut away the excess factory adhesive and it slips through easily to further baffle air movement. I'll be using the denim batt insulation after I get a better handle on gaps left from built-ins.

Leftover 1” Iso foam scraps that went under the cargo area carpet helped while van camping so looking forward to an insulated floor.

For privacy over the windows we used magnets and $5 Harbor Freight 40x72” moving blankets as black-out & insulation curtains over side & back glass, worked very well. Wash the cheap blankets to fluff them up! We had very little condensation with just one or two people and 20° temperatures with the front windows cracked.

We were going to insulate the cab area & windows with two HF $10 72x80” camouflage utility blankets but those got given away on the last (cold) trips second day at the scene of a bad accident on the Ohio Tollway, family of five and at least 12 rollovers 25’ up then back down an embankment into a swamp. .. I was first on the scene, most violent single car accident I've ever seen, and was checking trees for people hanging in them or stray body parts but got to help everyone crawl out of the upside down & unrecognizable mid-size station wagon under their own power!...

I’ll share that seeing debris on the catalytic ignite with me standing next to the car when coaching the first person out did peel a year off my life plus added eleventeen new grey hairs - but the open flames went back out, no fuel-oil-fluid leaks had reached that area, whew. Absolutely the most aerobatics I’ve ever seen without an airplane. Anyways, how those blankets went not to cover blood and guts but wrap live and alert people on a cold empty highway at midnight & that seemed like a deal for a $20.

Next up: wiring it for 12VDC & 120VAC
 

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"A ginormous cargo space sure shrinks after a few days on the road. I am charting what storage spaces are needed for baggage plus staples needed to van camp painlessly. That painless part is the catch, sorting through bins/boxes/bags of jumbles of stuff and the inevitable repacking drift of items proper homes gets worse every day on the road, sure takes the joy out of a quick stop or jumping back into the van for ‘one’ item."

Drawers are your friend. Everything packed in my van has its specific place, so we are pretty close to painless. Small items get small drawers so the drawers themselves don't become jumbles.
 

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I also have a few spaces with just doors but they are item specific so there is less space lost than even a drawer. One holds the butane cooktop and fuel, and one is sized to take a cardboard box that reams of paper come in. It holds the paper goods and some items used when cooking. Inside it is a jumble but it can be removed and searched by your partner when you need that special spatula or whatever. Clothes just go behind doors too, or in the wheel well caverns as they conform to odd shapes like nothing else will.

I looked back at your posts Zoomyn, and wonder how the denim insulation has worked out. I avoid denim for anything that can get wet as it sponges water and takes forever to dry. Though I hope condensation etc. has not happened in your van, I stayed away from it like the plague JIC.
 
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I looked back at your posts Zoomyn, and wonder how the denim insulation has worked out...
RDinNHandAZ?... My last post ^^ paragraph six, last line.... "I'll be using the denim batt insulation after I get a better handle on gaps left from built-ins."

Factory door speakers swapped to Nakamichi SP-S1620 6.5" 2-ways: RMS 30w, Peak 300w, Sensitivity 88dB, 50-22kHz, 4 ohms. These had the lowest frequency range plus lowest RMS watt handling I found to better match the 12-ish watt OEM amplifier. I added sound damper sheets on door cavity metal 18” from each speaker on each side and added 1/8” foam sheet on the door frame sides and up top under the glass plus covered the internal bracing.

Sound is great though still limited to about 26~ volume from amplifier distortion which may get worse with 4-speakers, but sound quality vastly improved especially where the back bench seat would go – rich full sound that just envelopes the listeners from all sides with bass enough to tickle. Not enough power in the amp to drown out road noise, this ain’t no Lexus.

Added prewire for rear speakers too from the upfitters past the slider - though now I’m wishing I’d provided a pair of take-offs for a subwoofer while I had the column open. I’ll nab two more of the SP-S1620’s soon. A good $45 spent.

http://www.nakamichiaudio.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=83

On getting RV electrical processes working I dug out a WFCO 120-12V converter w/ DC fuse box I glommed onto a few years back & installed three duplex circuit breakers that provides a 30A main and five zones from 3 circuit breaker spaces, one 20 and four 15 legs. I am not installing it until I know where the galley counters, bed & battery and water tanks are going.

Had all the wiring bought from bigbox store in solid copper conductor and then had visions of 800 miles of washboard gravel roads from Fairbanks to Nome and the slight chance the solid conductor could fatigue & break so dropped big bucks on spools of marine flex 10 & 12AWG. Prewired the cargo area with 10 & 12AWG stranded marine cables, and ran a pair of 2awg welding cables up to connect to future solar. The 2AWG may be overkill but were cheaper than the 4AWG I went after at the welding shop had since they were remnants. All power cables terminate behind the driver’s seat.

Used flex conduit and caterpillar c-grommets to prevent sheet metal edges from abrading wire insulation. There is a 3m auto trim epoxy that might bond with the nylon but to be sure I flame treated the nylon, not blackened or bubbled, just enough to oxidize the surface layer and allow adhesive to bite. I ran 10AWG to where the roof A/C will go, also 10AWG to everywhere 12VDC will be needed (roof vent, water pump, blank tank macerator pump) and separate circuit 12AWG 120VAC circuits to the four corners of the van plus another 10AWG to use as shore power inlet.
 

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Has the EPDM worked okay

Enter the 5x10 sheet of 0.060” EPDM roofing membrane pilfered from a roofers’ truck a few years back: using 3m spray adhesive I bonded panels of rubber to the two rear panels of plywood flooring plywood to sandwich the rubber between steel floor and wood. I changed from rubber to 0.063” silicone glommed onto eons ago for above the muffler, the first 30-inches behind the drivers seat, just in case that area ever gets a touch of grass fire or something else that would smoke vulcanized rubber. That silicone remains un-glued to be able to pull that section (not that anything would ever stick to it) and tie-in a crew bench seat or a pair of captains chairs in the future.

How has the EPDM worked for odour? in the summer you can smell an EPDM rooftop a long way off ...
 

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How has the EPDM worked for odour? in the summer you can smell an EPDM rooftop a long way off ... ( farmike )
'NEW' EPDM throws off a smell for a good while and might be a problem if larger than a dinky-doo 6'x12' patch. As van floor sound damper it's laminated between plywood and steel with very little air exchange. The sheet I used had already weathered three-plus years loosely rolled up in my garage and was nearly inert odor wise. What I did have to do was use a push broom style deck-brush, garden hose and ****'n span cleaner to get the talc & dirt crud off it and did not wake up the odor then. I'd bet a quick solvent rinse, adding a couple cups of rubbing alcohol to the floor cleaner, would quench a bunch of rubber odor by lifting uncured production line resins, handling aides or preservative residues if someone was troubled by new 'store-bought' EPDM...
 

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'NEW' EPDM throws off a smell for a good while and might be a problem if larger than a dinky-doo 6'x12' patch. As van floor sound damper it's laminated between plywood and steel with very little air exchange. The sheet I used had already weathered three-plus years loosely rolled up in my garage and was nearly inert odor wise. What I did have to do was use a push broom style deck-brush, garden hose and ****'n span cleaner to get the talc & dirt crud off it and did not wake up the odor then. I'd bet a quick solvent rinse, adding a couple cups of rubbing alcohol to the floor cleaner, would quench a bunch of rubber odor by lifting uncured production line resins, handling aides or preservative residues if someone was troubled by new 'store-bought' EPDM...
Thanks , I have a 5 yr of rollup in the garage, I will try this summer camping
- with your recommended prep.
 

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"Drawers are your friend. Everything packed in my van has its specific place, so we are pretty close to painless. Small items get small drawers so the drawers themselves don't become jumbles."... MsNomer

We discovered that drawers sure made our trip to FL a bit more organized. I say a bit because if we stuck to "what goes where" it could have been better.

Before our trip I decided that our "basement" (designed for carrying plywood sheets and 2x4s) would be a great place for some drawers while on the a trip.

Here's one of the two I made for rear access. There are two drawers that are 2' x 4' x 4-1/2" high. The 2' x 4' folding table for the dining area also stores under there. Room for one more drawer that I haven't made yet.



In the side door, the basement has space for two outdoor folding chairs and another drawer, about 14" x 4' x 4-1/2".



They worked out well for books, maps, additional shoes, a Leatherman, and extra clothes, sweaters, jackets, etc.

Ed
 

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That is some fine cabinetry. Once upon a time, long ago and far away, I stood just under 6' 2" tall so... ...robbing space for a complete basement is not in the cards.

We are looking at tall and/or full-height pantry slides for permanent hideaway nooks...

Probably a wheel well -to- a back door utility slide-out drawer, half the width of the door set and behind the latched non-handled door, yanno something to accept four or six grocery bags out of the sun & out of sight.

Anyhow, we are gathering tools and materials to do the next surge of construction, a Kreg R3 Jig & clamp purchased, biscuit plate joiner, power compound miter saw - new outdoor workbench and a pergola sunshade over it..

More Window Wagon fun to be posted shortly :D
 

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I don't mean to hijack this thread but Proeddie, where can we see finished pics of your van ? I checked out your build blog and it doesn't show final product or even the pics you have here. A link would be great. Thanks.
 

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I don't mean to hijack this thread but Proeddie, where can we see finished pics of your van ? I checked out your build blog and it doesn't show final product or even the pics you have here. A link would be great. Thanks.
Thanks for reminding me! I need to add a lot of stuff to my blog to reflect many new items added but not documented. I'll try to get that stuff posted this week!

Thanks for asking...

Zoomyn... sorry for the brief hijack... enjoying your progress and build info!

Ed

ps. Of course, "finished" is still a way off!
 
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