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We put a Champion 3500 on our hitch cargo carrier with some sound deadening boards hanging of the sides. The dB is less than 60 and we don’t notice that bad inside the van. Granted we haven’t used it that much so far but it’s good for backup. We were looking forward to using it at Yosemite in June for a hot shower at the appointed time of use but that plan may be open now because of covid 19.
 

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Thanks for the update. I would like to know more about this unit. Any ideas where I can get more details.
If asking about the Onan inverter 2800-Watt RV generator, the only information I have other than what I was told at show is that the model is QG 2800i. The MotorHome Magazine ad shows a unit that looks slightly different than a regular QG 2800, but doesn’t share any information other than saying it’s “quieter and vibrates less than other models”. I take that to mean quieter than other Onan, not necessarily other brands.

Ad says to circle 101 on Reader Service Card for information.

I was told at show that it was similar in size and weight, so can fit where QG 2800 fit previously. He estimated the new generator would be available by end of year, with the 4000-Watt version next year.
 

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My preference would be to have enough battery energy to power A/C overnight, but that’s a lot more expensive than a portable inverter generator.
Not only is it more expensive, it is an order of magnitude more expensive. I had an onan 3000 on my last RV, 1989 Dodge B350, while in my 2018 Ram Promaster 3500 I have batteries and an inverter.

The batteries and inverter are more than capable of running my 5000 BTU AC all night, but cost over $6000. (600 Amp hour lithium batteries and 3000 VA inverter) This is the price I paid to avoid generator noise. In my case I am not staying in camp grounds and need to avoid drawing any attention, so I paid it, if I was where I could run a generator, I would have at least $3000 more in my pocket now. (i'd still have some batteries and a smaller inverter with a portable generator)

If asking about the Onan inverter 2800-Watt RV generator, the only information I have other than what I was told at show is that the model is QG 2800i. The MotorHome Magazine ad shows a unit that looks slightly different than a regular QG 2800, but doesn’t share any information other than saying it’s “quieter and vibrates less than other models”. I take that to mean quieter than other Onan, not necessarily other brands.
I had an Onan 3000, it was loud as ****. Quiter than a 3600 rpm onan is not impressive. I also have an Onan 4.0, which turns at 1800 rpm and is not load at all. It all depends on the comparison. I love the 4.0, hated the 3.0.
On the down side the 4.0 weighs over 400 pounds, while the 3.0 is much lighter.
 

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We put a Champion 3500 on our hitch cargo carrier with some sound deadening boards hanging of the sides. The dB is less than 60 and we don’t notice that bad inside the van. Granted we haven’t used it that much so far but it’s good for backup. We were looking forward to using it at Yosemite in June for a hot shower at the appointed time of use but that plan may be open now because of covid 19.
I am not sure if Yosemite will allow generator use like that, but I suspect not.
 

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Thanks that it helps us understand. Technically an order of magnitude is 10 times as much not twice, the equivalent of moving the decimal point one place to the right.

Generator use is allowed only from 7 am to 9 am, noon to 2 pm, and 5 pm to 7 pm. Generator use is not allowed at other times.
 

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Thanks that it helps us understand. Technically an order of magnitude is 10 times as much not twice, the equivalent of moving the decimal point one place to the right.

Generator use is allowed only from 7 am to 9 am, noon to 2 pm, and 5 pm to 7 pm. Generator use is not allowed at other times.
I spent over 6000 dollars and think a cheap generator could be had for less than 600, so that is what I meant (being an engineer I try to be precise, but often fail badly). I understand the confusion. In may case I would need a battery system and inverter too, so it was only about twice as expensive for me, but for many a cheap generator would be all they need. **** I see a lot of entire builds for less than my electrical system (which is now ever 7000 as it continues to expand)

Originally I had just the 600 amp hour battery, panels, victron inverter, and B2B sterling charger, and now have added more monitoring and solar, with a new b2b charger from victron.

Thank you, because I was not clear (I truly believe most misunderstandings are the authors fault not the reader).

The entry point for an electrical system to power an air conditioner is at least 2x less if not 10 or more times less. A generator just was not an option for me, but for others it is going to be the cheaper option by a long shot (at least in the short term, in the long term I don't know, batteries wear out, generators wear out and consumer fuel)
 

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I spent over 6000 dollars and think a cheap generator could be had for less than 600, so that is what I meant (being an engineer I try to be precise, but often fail badly). I understand the confusion. In may case I would need a battery system and inverter too, so it was only about twice as expensive for me, but for many a cheap generator would be all they need. **** I see a lot of entire builds for less than my electrical system (which is now ever 7000 as it continues to expand)

Originally I had just the 600 amp hour battery, panels, victron inverter, and B2B sterling charger, and now have added more monitoring and solar, with a new b2b charger from victron.

Thank you, because I was not clear (I truly believe most misunderstandings are the authors fault not the reader).

The entry point for an electrical system to power an air conditioner is at least 2x less if not 10 or more times less. A generator just was not an option for me, but for others it is going to be the cheaper option by a long shot (at least in the short term, in the long term I don't know, batteries wear out, generators wear out and consumer fuel)
I agree with your numbers which seem very reasonable depending on assumptions and need.

My 2200/1800 inverter generator was about $600 with tax and all, and I already had a hitch cargo box I could use to haul it to football games when needed due to warm weather. It paid for itself after a couple of games because hotels on football weekends are expensive and most require two night minimum. Generator noise isn’t an issue at all since all motorhomes run them all night.

The cheapest battery system I could have built would have been around $2,000 for 8 flooded golf cart batteries mounted on hitch tray and 2,000-Watt inverter/charger. I decided that wasn’t physically practical though.

For about $3,000 I could have gone with 8 AGM golf cart batteries mounted under van on custom racks/supports, which would have been my preference, but my van is too old and needs replacement so not worth the cost or effort.

In either case I was looking at 3 to 5 times more to add battery system compared to an entry-level generator (not a Honda or Yamaha), so decision was easy because of van’s age.

On a new van I could easily justify $3,000 to $6,000 in order to run A/C overnight without a generator, but have a serious problem with costs around $20,000 for OEM systems built using Volta or Xantrex equipment. At that cost I’ll stick with a generator.
 
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