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At the Geneva Motor Show, Nissan unveiled it e-NV200. It's a fully electric cargo van.



Would you be interested in a fully electric cargo van. Should Ram consider making an electric version of the Promaster? Does Ram even have access to the technology needed to make an electric Promaster.

Here is an article to find out more about the e-NV200.

http://www.caranddriver.com/news/nissan-e-nv200-electric-van-photos-and-info-news
 

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....cut..... Does Ram even have access to the technology needed to make an electric Promaster. ....cut.....
I think so. Even if not available in-house at RAM and/or Fiat, the technology is available for a fee on a contract or partnership basis. That's how some auto companies got started. Besides, I don't think that electric would be all new to them.

To your first point, I personally don't believe there is enough of a market for an electric ProMaster. Before that happens I'd first expect a hybrid PM which would cost less and not have a limited range. I just can't see too many electric PMs used for business or recreation. And what's left beyond that?
 

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If they made a plug in hybrid, I would buy one. For me it would be perfect for around town deliveries running on electric power. Then it could charge itself up on the highway on the way back to the shop and /or be plugged in for the night. To me the PM is the perfect platform for such a vehicle. The wide open spaces in the ladder type frame would be perfect for battery storage. If they didn't want to screw with the gas engine, they could adapt the rear straight axle to an electric drive axle. If they ran both together, the MPG would go up quit a bit. Don't laugh, there is a company that is doing just that right now with new GM trucks and vans.
 

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I would buy an hybrid anytime, but a full electric vehicle? Na.

I don't want to start a debate, but it seams to me that one has to charge the batteries with electricity that most likely was produced with coal or gas, so I don't really see the gain, environmentally speaking. Not to mention old batteries disposal.
 

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Not in the slightest. For what I'm going to be using it for, every trip is going to be between 400 and 2000 km at a time. Electric just ain't gonna work.
 

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... I don't really see the gain, environmentally speaking...
The gain is the fact that even considering all the losses in power generation, transmission, battery charging, and electric motor efficiency, the electric approach is at least twice as efficient from a pure energy consumption standpoint. If that weren't rue there would be absolutely no point to a hybrid.

However, that advantage fades in cold climates where the waste heat from the engine is useful to heat the vehicle cabin. Plus you have to keep the batteries warm.

I'd love an all-electric car. can or truck, but in my area it's just too cold to be practical. I would be all over this though:
http://www.zeromotorcycles.com
 

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The gain is the fact that even considering all the losses in power generation, transmission, battery charging, and electric motor efficiency, the electric approach is at least twice as efficient from a pure energy consumption standpoint. If that weren't rue there would be absolutely no point to a hybrid.

However, that advantage fades in cold climates where the waste heat from the engine is useful to heat the vehicle cabin. Plus you have to keep the batteries warm.

I'd love an all-electric car. can or truck, but in my area it's just too cold to be practical. I would be all over this though:
http://www.zeromotorcycles.com
I would agree that the electric approach is at least twice as energy efficient but only if speeds are kept relatively low, or if there is a lot of stop and go where regeneration saves much fuel. However, at higher freeway speeds where a gasoline engine can run more efficiently than in city, and where the electric car runs less efficient due to loses, the difference is much less. At a steady 70 to 80 MPH I'd bet a modern gasoline car probably doesn't use much more energy than its electric counterpart. Perhaps even less.

The biggest problem I see with an all-electric van of ProMaster size is cost. A loaded PM van would weigh a lot more than a Nissan Leaf, so it would need at least twice as much battery capacity. And that would add a lot of cost.

By the way, there is a company that makes an electric commercial van that was designed from the ground up. And it is expensive. Its battery bank is huge.
 

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The gain is the fact that even considering all the losses in power generation, transmission, battery charging, and electric motor efficiency, the electric approach is at least twice as efficient from a pure energy consumption standpoint. If that weren't rue there would be absolutely no point to a hybrid.http://www.zeromotorcycles.com
You are more than probably right, my assumptions came right from my head, not a very reliable source according to my wife. ;)

Here's a more reliable one, that validates your opinion on the matter:

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/517146/are-electric-vehicles-better-for-the-environment-than-gas-powered-ones/
 

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I drive a subcompact EV every day and absolutely love it. as for efficiency it gets (I don't remember the exact numbers) around 119 mpge city and 99 mpge highway where mpge is an equivalent value of BTUs in electricity as in gasoline. My Mitubishi iMIEV has a 16KW battery pack and has a EPA range of 62 miles (Nissan Leaf has a 24KW battery). This tells me that my 16Kw battery pack stores as much energy as 1/2 gal of gas! That's terrible, but it's the best technology I can afford so I live with it.
An electric delivery truck in the city makes since. I want a van for recreational purposes that involves long distance travel and I don't plan to use it in town so a hybrid is out of the question. Fuel cells are the secret to highway travel in an EV. They create electricity via a chemical reaction and are 80 percent efficient as apposed to a gasoline engine that is limited to something like 35 percent efficient. (don't quote me on those numbers because it's been 15 years since I researched it.)
 

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Here is a little information from the government on gas versus electric efficiency:

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/evtech.shtml

All-Electric Vehicles (EVs)




All-electric vehicles (EVs) run on electricity only. They are propelled by an electric motor (or motors) powered by rechargeable battery packs. EVs have several advantages over vehicles with internal combustion engines (ICEs):
  • Energy efficient. Electric vehicles convert about 59–62% of the electrical energy from the grid to power at the wheels—conventional gasoline vehicles only convert about 17–21% of the energy stored in gasoline to power at the wheels.*
  • Environmentally friendly. EVs emit no tailpipe pollutants, although the power plant producing the electricity may emit them. Electricity from nuclear-, hydro-, solar-, or wind-powered plants causes no air pollutants.
The thing to keep in mind is that electrical power generating plants use almost three BTUs of heat energy for every BTU of electrical energy produced to run the EV. And I'm not even certain that the above estimate includes all "grid" loses in getting power from the power plant to the car's battery charger. On the other hand it takes energy to get gasoline to the Exxon station too.

Anyway, the thing about electric cars and motorcycles is that they are often rated with a "maximum" range and a "maximum" speed, but they rarely tell us that the actual range at high speed is a fraction of what the vehicle can get at slower speeds. As an owner I'm sure you know that if you drive at near top speed your range would be very short. On the other hand if you drive at a steady 30 MPH the range can be great. My take is that for city driving electrics are great. For Interstate driving not so much.

Cars with internal combustion engines (gasoline more so than diesel) typically have the engine sized much larger than needed for optimum driving efficiency. And when driven at 30 MPH instead of getting 100 MPG due to reduced load the engine becomes so inefficient that mileage doesn't go up very much. That's where hybrids try to capitalize on ICE's weakness.

If true that your battery only holds 1/2 gallon of gas-equivalent energy, doesn't that mean that the power plant had to use about 1-1/2 gallons-equivalent of fuel to produce that much electricity? And if you take your 62 mile range and divide by 1-1/2 gallons, doesn't that work out to about 40 MPG?

To be honest, I didn't convert your battery's 16 kw-hr energy capacity to gasoline equivalent so I don't know if the eMPG you quoted was adjusted for the amount of fuel that would be required at the powerplant, or if it is only based on what your car uses.

In either case I'm glad to see people like you buying electric vehicles when it's practical. I wish I could justify one myself but I don't drive enough in city traffic any longer. Most of my miles are on Interstates or back roads during long trips. Electric just would work for this type of driving.

I drive a subcompact EV every day and absolutely love it. as for efficiency it gets (I don't remember the exact numbers) around 119 mpge city and 99 mpge highway where mpge is an equivalent value of BTUs in electricity as in gasoline. My Mitubishi iMIEV has a 16KW battery pack and has a EPA range of 62 miles (Nissan Leaf has a 24KW battery). This tells me that my 16Kw battery pack stores as much energy as 1/2 gal of gas! That's terrible, but it's the best technology I can afford so I live with it.
An electric delivery truck in the city makes since. I want a van for recreational purposes that involves long distance travel and I don't plan to use it in town so a hybrid is out of the question. Fuel cells are the secret to highway travel in an EV. They create electricity via a chemical reaction and are 80 percent efficient as apposed to a gasoline engine that is limited to something like 35 percent efficient. (don't quote me on those numbers because it's been 15 years since I researched it.)
 

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At least when it comes to a cargo van there's a lot of space to work with, so they can turn the whole floor into a battery giving the whole vehicle a ton of power, i'd love to see it happen
 

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If true that your battery only holds 1/2 gallon of gas-equivalent energy said:
MPGe is for only one method for consumers to compare mileage numbers from EVs to ICEs. It isn't meant to be some theory of total electrons vs number of dead dinosaurs.

My window sticker read 112 MPGe and it stated that I have a range of 62 miles/charge. My 4th grade daughter would divide 62 by 112 to convert my range into gallon of gas. OK, my 16KW battery holds .55 capacity of energy as 1 gallon of gas.

This forum might be too advanced for me.
 

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MPGe is for only one method for consumers to compare mileage numbers from EVs to ICEs. It isn't meant to be some theory of total electrons vs number of dead dinosaurs.

My window sticker read 112 MPGe and it stated that I have a range of 62 miles/charge. My 4th grade daughter would divide 62 by 112 to convert my range into gallon of gas. OK, my 16KW battery holds .55 capacity of energy as 1 gallon of gas.

This forum might be too advanced for me.
I'm not attacking or questioning your purchase. In fact I admire it.

However, as a technical guy with a little more education than 4th grade, I don't like to see one-sided information that is presented out of context (not that you have -- not saying that at all). Unfortunately our government often tries to sway public opinion with biased information when it serves the right agenda. And as they say, the devil is in the details...

I have nothing against electric cars and would like to see a plug-in hybrid van manufactured because I believe it would be great to integrate the battery/charging/power/AC system for camping/RV use. Would solve a lot of problems and help defer part of the added cost.
 

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The Navistar eStar was the all-electric commercial van I was trying to recall earlier. It had a 5100 pound load capacity according to Wikipedia (not that different than ProMaster) with a claimed range of 100 miles with an 80 kW-hr battery pack. It was reportedly discontinued last year after a couple of years of production. I’ve seen reports that price was in the $150,000 range.

 

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Why pollute with a gas engine, when a coal burning electricity plant can do the polluting for you?
These kind of comments crack me up. I think that myth has been debunked long ago. What about us EV drivers that live where Hydro and wind farms are used? If I lived where coal was the only source of electricity I would probably have solar panels on my roof, or better yet I'd move.
 
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