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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all. Got the 3.6 motor and decided to finally swap out the oil cooler unit. After cutting the upper intake manifold out due to the top bolts being completely rusted (I'll post the video of that another day) I got the cooler out and engine cleaned out. Unfortunately the cooler hadn't came in the mail yet and I cover the intake with shop towels, closed the hood and went to bed. The part came in the mail two days later, but it rained pretty bad the day prior. I came out this morning and the engine was flooded! All the water from the top of the hood leaked in and filled the motor! I pulled the oil plug and literally got two gallons of water out before any oil! 5 of the cylinders intake valves looked closed but I defiantly got a ton of water in the cylinder on the intake stroke... I've been using a turkey baster and small hose to suck out as much as I can through the valve opening. Any chance water got in any of the other cylinders? Any other tips on getting the water out? Exactly how Effed am
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I at this point? Thanks...
 

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2018 136 HR Ont.
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What I would do is put oil in the crank, pull the plugs and blow out each cylinder with compressed air to make sure the cylinders aren't full. This is a good application for WD40 (I rarely use it), I'd spray liberally in the intake ports and the spark plug holes. Then I'd bump it a few times with the starter motor and then give it a few rotations. After that I'd put a little motor oil in the intake and cylinders and spin it again. That's what I would do.
When you get it back together I'd run it till warm and change the oil again
 

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2019 159 EXT HR (3500) in WA
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I agree with @83Grumman's approach to get the water out. It has not been in there for very long so probably not too much damage. I'd probably pull all the plugs and spin the starter first. That would pump out the bulk of the water. Then use the air compressor. Get the water out, some quick lube in to stop rust, then get the engine running and hot as soon as you can. Probably 2x or more oil changes to make sure all the moisture is out.

Rubbing the magic lamp of @Kip-on-truckin might summon forth some great wisdom.
 

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2017 2500 HiTop 159 Cargo Van white.
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We see flooded motors with dirt bikes all the time.
Pull the plugs and spin the motor. Drain and fill oil. Get it back together as quickly as you can and run it till hot and then change the oil and run it till hot and then go for a very long drive to dry everything out.
Get it done fast and you should not have any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got it all back together. I pulled the plugs, bumped the starter for a few rotations and got some compressed air in there. I did an extra oil change on the thing too. I ran it for about an hour and took it for a drive as well. I think I may have dodged a bullet on this one. Thanks for the help guys.
 

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2017 2500 HiTop 159 Cargo Van white.
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If the oil stays clear you should be good.
 

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2019 159 EXT HR (3500) in WA
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Glad it appears to be working.

Ya, you definitely want to watch it super closely. Maybe change the oil again in 50 or 100 to make sure there's not any nasties in there from having the engine all open.

I guess the scary thing would be is if microscopic flecks of rust are circulating and causing damage. Supposedly the filter will pull all those out, right?
 

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Sorry, missed that shoutout for some reason. Maybe the older I get, the more my lamp needs rubbed for me to respond.
I wouldnt worry about the water anymore. As soon as the engine gets over 200 deg, the water turns to steam, and the pcv valve sucks the steam into the intake and it burns.
I wouldnt worry about the cylinders or rings. Water is a byproduct of combustion anyway, so internally the engine can handle it.
I wouldnt worry about the crankcase either. Everything in there is coated with oil all the time. And it’s not like it sat in water long enough to do much. A rusty rod is no different than a non rusty rod in every way except appearance.
The only thing to worry about would have been hydrolocking, which you already avoided since it now runs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks again everyone. Took it on a little road trip today, about 150 miles total and she's running like a champ. I haven't gotten the check engine code which drove me to replace the sensor either so I feel pretty good about it!
 

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That's awesome!

This is about where I would want to change the oil & filter again to make sure there's nothing scary in it :)
 
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