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Discussion Starter #1
Meant to take a pic. Flat tire, side of the pa turnpike, slight incline. Jacked it up on the factory scissor jack, got in the back to retrieve the spare, wham! Jack toppled as the incline let the van roll forward a bit. Luckily, jack fit back under it, and the suspension is such that the brake disc was still maybe 1/2 inch off the ground. No damage. Also means we could probably drive with 3 wheels if we need to.

hot tip: carry a wheel chock so this doesnt happen to you!
 

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2017 159, w/dual sliders. SF Bay area
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Ouch. Thanks for sharing. Off to get some wheel chocks...
 

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2014 Ram Promaster 2500 159" diesel
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Always remove your spare first from under or inside your truck. If your tire is under the truck you don't want it falling on your noggin if the jack fails. Also if the spare is flat there is no use jacking the truck up until it is fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good advice everyone. Of note is that unlike every other scissor jack in existence, the pm jack base pivots. No idea why. Makes it extra tippy.
 
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2019 118" Silver
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Glad to hear you averted disaster!

Have always been concerned about this since also having it happen (1st time) years ago while pulling on the wrench to fully loosen lug nuts for removal. Luckily the wheel was still on the vehicle and had a couple lug nuts left in it. IIRC it was my 1964 Beetle (1st car I paid $150 for - yeah, piece of junk but it 'mostly' ran and I learned a LOT). It had a rusted-out floor pan and I was using a bottle jack to lift it at a non-standard point when it started to move. Had to lower the jack and start over in another spot.

Many of us remember the 'wonderful' bumper jacks of the past. Have had a couple 'shifts in position' using those things too but luckily never with the wheel off, and never had one fly off and hit me or jettison off into the distance. Seems these issues scarred me since I'm always in a hurry to get at least one lug nut hand tight just in case. ;-)
 

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2018 159 High Roof gas, BC, Canada
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Good advice everyone. Of note is that unlike every other scissor jack in existence, the pm jack base pivots. No idea why. Makes it extra tippy.
Agreed. I can see only downsides to the pivoting.
 
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Another tip, in case anyone doesn't already know it: Slightly loosen the lug nuts before you jack the vehicle up, since the initial loosening is the time when you will be applying the most force (and the wheel will be inclined to spin if it is in the air).
 

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2018 159 High Roof gas, BC, Canada
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Another tip, in case anyone doesn't already know it: Slightly loosen the lug nuts before you jack the vehicle up, since the initial loosening is the time when you will be applying the most force (and the wheel will be inclined to spin if it is in the air).
This is a good tip for cars and especially for our PMs, with their super high torque specs for the lug bolts of 145 ft-lbs / 197 N-m).

If the PM is up on the jack already, applying 145+ ft-lbs (probably a lot more to break it free) could indeed lever it off the jack, especially since it pivots.
 

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I’ve seen cars roll off jacks a few times when the parking brake wasn’t used or couldn’t hold. Guys thought that placing transmission in Park would keep car from moving, but once one of the drive wheels is off the ground, the other side is free to roll due to the differential action.

This makes trying to break loose lug nuts more dangerous if one of drive wheels is off the ground, particularly for FWD vehicles since there is no parking brake in front. Applying torque to loosen lug nuts will cause other side to drive forward or backwards.

I agree it’s good idea to break lug nuts loose on ground, and also chock wheels.
 

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Great discussion. Sorry, Kip, for your mishap. Very glad you weren't injured.

So, reading through the comments has prompted me to take a look at my 2019 User Manual. (It's always good to refresh one's memory now and then, especially when it comes to safety when driving our rigs!)

On Page 194 of the PDF file -- JACKING AND TIRE CHANGING -- (p196 of the actual Acrobat Reader file) there is this warning:
  • Being under a jacked-up vehicle is dangerous. The vehicle could slip off the jack and fall on you. You could be crushed. Never put any part of your body under a vehicle that is on a jack. If you need to get under a raised vehicle, take it to a service center where it can be raised on a lift.
Then, as the very first step in the process of changing a flat:
  • Remove the spare tire before attempting to jack up the vehicle.
This is followed by numerous and essential steps to take in order:
  1. Park the vehicle on a firm, level surface. Avoid ice or slippery areas.
    WARNING! Do not attempt to change a tire on the side of the vehicle close to moving traffic. Pull far enough off the
    road to avoid being hit when operating the jack or changing the wheel.
  2. Turn on the Hazard Warning flasher.
    [I have additional, high-visibility LED flashers that I can deploy along side the road]
  3. Apply the parking brake firmly.
  4. Place the transmission in PARK (REVERSE for manual transmission) .
  5. Turn the ignition OFF.
  6. Block both the front and rear of the wheel diagonally opposite the jacking position. For example, if the right front wheel is being changed, block the left rear wheel.
    NOTE: Passengers should not remain in the vehicle when the vehicle is being jacked.
Finally, I will include this last step to take rather than copy everything across:
  • Loosen (but do not remove) the wheel lug bolts by turning them to the left one turn while the wheel is still on the ground.
Bottom line: all the necessary and safe steps to take in changing a tire are there in the manual for reference. But who reads manuals, right? Well, every once in a while it's good to refresh our memories before we're in an emergency situation.

I've gone ahead and attached my 2019 user manual as a PDF just in case it might be of help to others.

Again, thanks for this discussion! I'm glad that I read carefully through this important information again. 😎
 

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Great discussion. Sorry, Kip, for your mishap. Very glad you weren't injured.

So, reading through the comments has prompted me to take a look at my 2019 User Manual. (It's always good to refresh one's memory now and then, especially when it comes to safety when driving our rigs!)

On Page 194 of the PDF file -- JACKING AND TIRE CHANGING -- (p196 of the actual Acrobat Reader file) there is this warning:
  • Being under a jacked-up vehicle is dangerous. The vehicle could slip off the jack and fall on you. You could be crushed. Never put any part of your body under a vehicle that is on a jack. If you need to get under a raised vehicle, take it to a service center where it can be raised on a lift.
Then, as the very first step in the process of changing a flat:
  • Remove the spare tire before attempting to jack up the vehicle.
This is followed by numerous and essential steps to take in order:
  1. Park the vehicle on a firm, level surface. Avoid ice or slippery areas.
    WARNING! Do not attempt to change a tire on the side of the vehicle close to moving traffic. Pull far enough off the
    road to avoid being hit when operating the jack or changing the wheel.
  2. Turn on the Hazard Warning flasher.
    [I have additional, high-visibility LED flashers that I can deploy along side the road]
  3. Apply the parking brake firmly.
  4. Place the transmission in PARK (REVERSE for manual transmission) .
  5. Turn the ignition OFF.
  6. Block both the front and rear of the wheel diagonally opposite the jacking position. For example, if the right front wheel is being changed, block the left rear wheel.
    NOTE: Passengers should not remain in the vehicle when the vehicle is being jacked.
Finally, I will include this last step to take rather than copy everything across:
  • Loosen (but do not remove) the wheel lug bolts by turning them to the left one turn while the wheel is still on the ground.
Bottom line: all the necessary and safe steps to take in changing a tire are there in the manual for reference. But who reads manuals, right? Well, every once in a while it's good to refresh our memories before we're in an emergency situation.

I've gone ahead and attached my 2019 user manual as a PDF just in case it might be of help to others.

Again, thanks for this discussion! I'm glad that I read carefully through this important information again. 😎
I had a similar factory jack collapse in a Walmart parking lot on a flat surface. I never use a factory jack any more. I use a standard hydraulic garage floor jack and a Jack stand just to be safe. I also carry plywood with me in case I end up somewhere that is not blacktop. The jack stand goes under the axel in case the jack fails. 2.5 ton hydraulic jacks cost $60-$80 and a pair of 3 ton jack stands cost around $30 at home depot. Anyone who jacks up a car and goes under it without a jack stand is asking to get crushed. You only get one body.
 

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I never use a factory jack any more. I use a standard hydraulic garage floor jack and a Jack stand just to be safe. 2.5 ton hydraulic jacks cost $60-$80 and a pair of 3 ton jack stands cost around $30 at home depot.
Hi J, Could you please tell me which model of jack and jack stands you use? Thx!
 
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