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Discussion Starter #1
I am probably going to run 6 steel tubes across from one mid-rail to the other to support a mattress on top of a plywood sheet. The 2nd and 5th tube will be supported by posts in the middle.
Will the Promaster handle it?
My wife and I are getting older so we wont be jumping up and down on it real hard.
 

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I am not an auto structural engineer. My thought is that this arrangement may put a twisting force on the mid rail to attempt to pull the rail top edge away from the sheet metal side of the van. How is it attached? Many welds? Or is the attachment to the side just the same foam glue used elsewhere? In the past there have been mentions on this forum of wrinkles and distortion of exterior sheet metal simply due to expansion of sprayed interior foam insulation. I am sure others will comment on this attachment issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The only welding would be the rectangular tubes to the bars. No glue, no bolts. The tubes drop in and pop out when the bed is removed to hull cow manure for the garden.
 

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I grew up on a dairy farm in Vermont and I make it a rule not to sleep where the cow manure has been.

........However...... I believe that rib is more than capable of supporting two people on the bed. Lets just think about it............. the combined weight of two plus the bed might be 500 lbs. (I am thinking a heavy mattress in case you wonder) and it will be supported in 12 points on the ribs which span a vertical support too. Thats 40 lbs per attachment/ 250 per side/ 125 in front and behind the vertical. Build it, it will be fine, if it warps the sheet metal post pictures.
 

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I did something like what you are talking about. I bolted a 2x4 to the horizontals on either side and spanned it with 2 aluminum beams. then plywood on top. No additional supports and no issues so far. Ill take some photos if that helps you.
 

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How about this for a concept? Instead of using bent metal brackets that would have to be carefully made to match the angle of the body sheet metal (and will probably scratch the paint) - attach some T-head bolts in the existing holes with hex nuts and washers, leaving a gap under the head wide enough for the slotted crossmember bar to drop over. If you are worried about the crossbar moving as the body flexes or while going over a speed bump or the like, a metal, plastic or rubber latch or clamp to the lower sheet metal area would take care of that. The factory made holes are meant for attaching things - even heavy things - and there is more strength in a sheer direction than a bent angle.

If my verbal description is too confusing, let me know - I could sketch something up.
 

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I just added 1/2" plywood to the sides of my van with attached wood strips to support the outer edges of my rear twin beds. The plywood is screwed and pop riveted to the upper and lower metal box beams and also glued to the polyiso foam in the walls. My guess is that the wood strips could easily support a cross mounted bed although my twins will be longitudinal. Biscuits secure the wood strips to the plywood.
 

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Another poster this morning has a bed to give away because they want to build a removable one. I would suggest any builder of a campervan to consider building the bed in two halves and of a lightweight form so that one person can disassemble it with out tools on the occasion their daughter wants help to move into her condo.... or whatever. Mine can be taken out in a couple of minutes without removing any other of the camper modules so a lot of room becomes available for that big yard sale sofa your wife bought or for carrying the Honda Metropolitan you bought in Phoenix. All these are real examples from the past year. I’m thinking I can get a Zero Turn Mower in if Craig’s list is kind!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
.... I would suggest any builder of a campervan to consider building the bed...so that one person can disassemble it with out tools...

If you are doing it yourself and have any kind of imagination and forethought it should be obvious, but I see so many that are not, so I think this is a great comment from RDinNHandAZ
 

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I bolted a steel angle-iron into those mid-rails and my bed rests on top of the flat horizontal piece of the angle-iron. No issues.

If you use something with more section width to it than your steel tube for the cross-member to stop it from bending; this will let it span the width of the van without needing a center support. In my case, the crossmembers are 2x4 lumber oriented vertically and that's overkill.

I wouldn't like having your removable piece go through the sheet metal of the van. It will get scraped up and damaged over time. Bolt something to the sheet metal of the van, then have your removable piece attach to or sit on top of that. That way, even if you scrape something up, it's a whole lot easier to fix than the bodyshell of the van itself.
 

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Another poster this morning has a bed to give away because they want to build a removable one. I would suggest any builder of a campervan to consider building the bed in two halves and of a lightweight form so that one person can disassemble it with out tools on the occasion their daughter wants help to move into her condo.... or whatever. Mine can be taken out in a couple of minutes without removing any other of the camper modules so a lot of room becomes available for that big yard sale sofa your wife bought or for carrying the Honda Metropolitan you bought in Phoenix. All these are real examples from the past year. I’m thinking I can get a Zero Turn Mower in if Craig’s list is kind!
Indeed, that was me. I had a metal bed frame that fit perfectly between the mid rails of the Promaster. I decided to use it for the last year while I was figuring out my "real" build with a removable 2 panel bed. Those mid rails are very strong. No need for 6 steel cross bars. The temporary frame I built using 2x4's and some 1x6 sides plus the generic metal bed frame was fine. Going to use some 80/20 or something welded up by the local fabricator for the removable one.

BTW, in case anyone is wondering, those hex shaped holes in the mid frames fit this rivnut from McMaster Carr:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#90720a500/=13tx0e2

You'll need this installation tool:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#96349a509/=13tx1ia

Those nuts are used all over the Promaster. I'm working on cataloging the various sheet metal fasteners on the Promaster and their corresponding McMaster part numbers. Anyone figured out those J nuts in the ceiling ribs yet?
 

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did you use existing wholes in the mid rails or drill out new holes? and how did you put your bed panel on the angle iron, inside the L or on top of the L? thanks! this was what i was thinkin for makin a removable bed on a 118" promaster... angle iron on the mid rails, and then making two bed panels 3/4" box tube steel welded in a rectangle with 3/4" ply on top of that with slot in the middle cut out big enough to fit my hand so that i can easily grab and remove the panels off the angle iron and strap them to the wall to stow away...
 

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My 2 Cents. Considering the side structure was meant to hold plastic trim panels , I ,myself would attach angle iron/alum to the horizontal rib and run "struts" down to the cargo anchor points , or similar convenient area . Spread the load to the floor . Make a triangle . The sheet metal is thin so it is best to tie to doubled/tripled seams.

Remember my 2 cents and 10 bucks will get you a cup o' joe anywhere !
 

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http://a.co/ilFcptb

Pour coffee dripper with a valve to hold the water until ready. Use a JetBoil to quickly heat water. Regular filters make cleanup a breeze.

I love each of my jetboil systems, I support those guys in Manchester NH but they are not for use inside a van, too unstable. Here is a stove designed to use inside: https://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corp...8&qid=1483498856&sr=1-1&keywords=butane+stove

Great post, and that looks like a wonderful product I might buy, but there is a Coffee thread where this might be better posted.
See: http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?p=375554#post375554
 

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I really like how you have framed bed supports. No need for heavy metal or 2X4s. I think you could have even supported the bed slats with 1X6 or 1X8s as well. It is amazing how strong wood is when used correctly. We also used the IKEA slats and are pleased by how comfortable they make the bed!
 
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