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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


I bought my PM last January and have used it twice for lengthy trips that required me to haul toys.




This carriage is what I haul, snugly tied down, in the back of my van while pulling a smallish horse trailer with my Morgan horse. inside I use a winch to load/unload the carriage with aluminum ramps. I love that it can be kept secure inside the van and out of the weather.

Once I get to the venue, I unload the carriage and sleep in the back of the van.

Lots of people have asked me why I don't let the horse ride in the van and pull a trailer with carriage on it. Problem with that idea is that my horse would lick my ears while I am driving. Plus he poops wherever he pleases. Not such a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Creating a partition

I didn't buy a PM with a partition between the driver/passenger space and the cargo space. But it needs something to keep the heat and air in the front while driving. And to put a damper on road noise.

I considered getting something like blackout curtains. This would enhance privacy but not do too much for thermal and audio insulations.

I bought instead some 2 inch thick cotton insulation and made a small plexiglass window in it. It works great. Cost $78. Materials from Homedepot. com.

I was on my way to a training camp and needed something right away. Though not fancy, it was highly effective in damping road noise and keeping the heat and air up front while I was driving. Plus it was non-toxic. I can do fancy later.

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Side view of the insulation

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Discussion Starter #3
Stumped about interior insulation

I am not sure what to use for insulating the walls and ceiling.


I have have been advised against using the cotton insulation on the metals walls and ceiling because it might hold moisture.

Roxul stone wool insulation appears to affect some folks ' health badly.


Then spray foam may have worrisome toxicity: isocyanates.
http://www2.buildinggreen.com/article/epa-takes-action-spray-foam-health-risks-0

So what works? A layer of formaldehyde-free fiberglass with a vapor barrier? Covered by and supported by reflectix?

I would have to cover the reflectix with something else because it is so shiny.
 

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I am not sure what to use for insulating the walls and ceiling.


I have have been advised against using the cotton insulation on the metals walls and ceiling because it might hold moisture.

Roxul stone wool insulation appears to affect some folks ' health badly.


Then spray foam may have worrisome toxicity: isocyanates.
http://www2.buildinggreen.com/article/epa-takes-action-spray-foam-health-risks-0

So what works? A layer of formaldehyde-free fiberglass with a vapor barrier? Covered by and supported by reflectix?

I would have to cover the reflectix with something else because it is so shiny.
Hi,
I think that the potential health problem with the urethane spray foams is only to the people applying the foam. I think that once its cured its not a health hazard to the occupants.

There are certainly a lot of ways to do the insulating that people have tried.

This is the way I decided on:
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Vehicles/PMRV/Insulation.htm
I used a 2 component closed sell DIY polyurethane foam kit.

I would be 100% satisfied with it if it had given the depth coverage that was promised on the package. As it is, the depth is less than I would like and I will probably end up adding some additional insulation between the sprayed on foam and the paneling.

The thing I like most about it is that it bonds tightly to the metal and it keeps any water vapor from getting to the metal and condensing.

If I were doing it again, I'd check around to see if any of the commercial outfits that spray foam would do it for a reasonable price.

Another technique that I think might work pretty well is to apply Great Stuff polyurethane foam in the can to the back side of about 1 inch thick insulation board pieces that are cut to fit the big spaces between the ribs, and then push the foam side of the pieces against the metal and prop them in place until the foam cures. The Great Stuff will very tightly bond the insulation board to the metal. Then fill the edges with Great Stuff.

Gary
 
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