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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi folks, I've seen lots of great ideas in this forum and could use a little help.


I have a 139 1500 tall body Promaster. The primary reason for buying it was to go touring with a bathroom and my toys. I have some issues that make travel difficult without a potty. When I went van hunting I started with minivans and while measuring to determine if I could fit a potty comfortably (I could not), the salesman said "you need to look at a Promaster". I liked size and after looking at the Ford and others in similar size, I drove home a discounted 2014 PM.


I have the Reliance "bucket" Potty. I like it purely for the convenience.


Now where I need help is the design and install of the interior build. I will be storing a kayak and 2 surfboards. I would like a bed/sofa and a cooler for food. We do not intend on sleeping in the PM, maybe I will occasionally on a short surf trip overnight. Will also travel with bicycles and beach fishing gear.


I've decided I want a bed/storage cabinet that is about 40" wide, 26" tall, and runs the 10' length connected to the wall behind the driver. I can store a kayak and 2 surfboards under it and throw a twin size mattress on top with some bolster pillows against the wall.


I have the factory plastic floor and walls. I'm looking at either a PVC structure or a plywood/wood structure. What I need help on is how to attach the cabinet (could be broken into 2 pieces) to the floor and the walls.


some ideas:
1) lay plywood under the cabinet and make it a box, not sure the best way to secure that to floor.
2) lay plywood under the whole van floor and cover with the factory plastic floor. Attach cabinetry by drilling through factory plastic floor into plywood underlayment.
3) not sure on how to attach to walls. I did like the rivet/bolt anchors I saw in one thread, I need to look those up again.


I've read most of the build threads and a solution just hasn't hit me yet.....
thanks for any help!
 

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As for a toilet for your rig, the Dometic 2.5 or 5 gal models are perfect! Totally self contained. I have a 2.5 installed and it works great! Check out my post ( My story, My build ). Bought mine on Amazon.
I also pulled my factory panels off, painted them, insulated and put them back up with same christmas tree fasteners. Found a good plastic paint that comes close to matching the cab interior color.
Insulation is a personal preference! There is so many products and combinations its confusing. I found that the Frost King 1/4" self adhesive duct insulation, reflectix then a layer of 1.5" Own corning pink fiberglass garage door insulation with attached plastic vapor seal worked best for me! Good Luck!
 

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Master Overland Custom Vans Tampa
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The factory floor is plywood, not plastic. For best strength and durability rivnuts or plusnuts are best to use. Otherwise just use a bunch of sheet metal screws. I glued and screwed furring strips as my cabinet attachment points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The factory floor is plywood, not plastic. For best strength and durability rivnuts or plusnuts are best to use. Otherwise just use a bunch of sheet metal screws. I glued and screwed furring strips as my cabinet attachment points.

I have what is listed on the build as "cargo compartment floor mat", it is definitely plastic laid over the metal floor.


I was looking at the rivnuts for the walls, was wondering if they are strong enough for the floor.


I also noticed 3 cargo tie down points that are bolted into the floor on the driver side (front, middle and back), maybe those would be good anchor points for the bottom of my cabinetry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
As for a toilet for your rig, the Dometic 2.5 or 5 gal models are perfect! Totally self contained. I have a 2.5 installed and it works great! Check out my post ( My story, My build ). Bought mine on Amazon.
I also pulled my factory panels off, painted them, insulated and put them back up with same christmas tree fasteners. Found a good plastic paint that comes close to matching the cab interior color.
Insulation is a personal preference! There is so many products and combinations its confusing. I found that the Frost King 1/4" self adhesive duct insulation, reflectix then a layer of 1.5" Own corning pink fiberglass garage door insulation with attached plastic vapor seal worked best for me! Good Luck!

saw your build, was gonna comment "nice left"!


I went with the cat-litter-type potty for the convenience of dumping, no liquids, just find a trash receptacle. We don't plan on using it a lot, just emergency. I actually have one of the liquid ones you suggest and would take it along if we decided to use it as the primary potty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
while searching around this morning I saw some threads showing cabinetry held by L brackets thru bolted into the floor. I'll have to take a look under to see how hard that would be. Seems like the strongest method unless I am under estimating the rivnuts........?
 

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Gator,

I agree with what other folks are saying for the walls, use rivet nuts or plus nuts (use the flange type as they are stronger than the flush fit). Here is one source for rivet nuts

http://www.cardinalcomponents.com

Here is a very simple way of installing rivet nuts that works better than buying a hand tool installer. You can use a cordless impact driver instead of the air impact driver shown in the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tA9fB3asSZU

If its not to high, attach a horizontal ledger/furring strip (wood/aluminum/steel) along the main horizontal rib just below where window cutouts. The hex shaped holes in this rib are for M8 hex rivet nuts (the hole diameter is 11mm). If this location is to high you can lower it but, you will need to span the grater distance from the back to the main vertical pillars. Aluminum structural framing profile works well for the application.

The aluminum profile I use is the brand called "Item". I like this brand because they have a fastener/connector ("Automatic Fastener") that is completely unique in that you do not need to buy or make brackets to make right angle connections and no machining is required; all you need is a cordless impact driver.

You may want to consider using aluminum structural framing profile to construct your cabinets. aluminum profile requires the least amount of skill and tools to work with to achieve a very strong light structure. All you need is a wood/miter chop saw with a high tooth count blade for non ferris metal, cordless drill/impact driver and a circular saw.

Item: http://www.itemnorthamerica.com Framing Profile: http://www.itemnorthamerica.com/catalog-iframe.html Automatic Fastener: http://www.itemnorthamerica.com/catalog-iframe.html

T-Slots: http://www.tslots.com/?gclid=CNuw2uLPyccCFQSUfgodUiYGhg

Bosch: http://www13.boschrexroth-us.com/framing_shop/default.aspx

8020: http://www.8020.net

For a simple cost effective floor connection I would recommend using the tie-down points that you mentioned (M8). One way to accomplish this is to lay down 1/2", 5/8" or 3/4" plywood and glue and bolt it down using all the tie-down points. You can use your plastic floor as a template to cut the plywood. Once the ply floor is in place you could glue your plastic floor to the plywood. Having a ply floor will allow you to use wood screws for your cabinet to floor connection. If you are sure of the location of your cabinet base and you want a stronger connection you could in stall T-nuts: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-nut

If you do decide to bolt through the PM floor, I would recommend through bolting. the Rivet nuts are really designed for (blind nut) application where you can't reach the back to install a nut. If you drill through the floor apply rust proof paint and use a protective caulking. Sika Flex 221 is a good all around sealer/adhesive.

Hope this helps,

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dave,
Thanks for the great suggestions and links!
I have some research to to!
Jerry



Installed Curt tow hitch last night. Wow! Only took 45 minutes! That was the easiest hitch install I have ever done!
Have to do the tow light wiring next.

Nice to have a few "instant gratification" projects on the list!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
rear speakers

got my rear speakers wired from the upfitters plug to the top rear door openings. Fishing through rear door wire chase was no problem. Connectors are in the mail from Mouser. Got some 1/4" MDF to build rear door speaker panels. Now, just need to pick some speakers and install!


oh year, and see the dealer about enabling rear speakers.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
trailer wiring

decided to modify the Curt trailer hitch wiring just a bit. I used a 20A fuse at the battery, used the 10A Curt fuse in the rear and also added an "always on" power port. Since I rarely use the trailer power, the rear power port will be good for 20A. I figured I was running a wire, might as well make good use off it! It looked like about 10 or 12 guage so should have minimal voltage drop.
 

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saw your build, was gonna comment "nice left"!


I went with the cat-litter-type potty for the convenience of dumping, no liquids, just find a trash receptacle. We don't plan on using it a lot, just emergency. I actually have one of the liquid ones you suggest and would take it along if we decided to use it as the primary potty.
Thanks for noticing! The Left is Green Bush in the mentawai islands in Indo! Bye far my favorite wave, a combo of Pipe and chopes! Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I made a little progress today.
Got the WeatherTech front floormat. happy with that.
Got my Polk DXi651s front speakers installed last week.
Today I spent 3 hours at the dealer to get my upfitters rear speakers enabled.
Installed the Polk DXi461speakers in the rear. Cut some MDF panels for rear flush mount and painted the MDF. Installed and hooked it all up.
If this van's a rockin' don't bother knockin'!!!!!!!:D


Went to Jo-Annes to pick up some speaker cloth and they couldn't find it :crying:


hope I don't jinx myself.....1150 miles and no squeeks!
 

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Where do you intend to put the speaker cloth when you find some? Front and rear? And what is this cloth supposed to be for?
If the fronts, are you gonna remove the entire door panel?
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I plan to cover the whole rear panels so you can't tell there is a speaker there. Well, that's my theory anyway, we'll see after I cover them. The speakers are flush mounted from the rear.
 

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I plan to cover the whole rear panels so you can't tell there is a speaker there. Well, that's my theory anyway, we'll see after I cover them. The speakers are flush mounted from the rear.
That should work well. It's easy to install to. Just stretch it evenly and hot-melt glue in on the back.
 

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You think hot melt will hold up in the Florida heat?
I was going to use 3M77 contact spray
Don't see why not? My hot melt glue takes a serious amount of heat to melt... Like burn-the-crap-out-of-your-fingers-hot!

Spray glue would probably be just as easy though.

I used hot-melt as I was attaching my speaker cloth to an uneven material - the back of the plastic panels in the rear corners.
 
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