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OK, I know this is opening a can of worms. It's like asking a mountain biker which is the best bike to buy. But, let me throw out my thoughts and see what happens. I've got some tread left but not enough for my next trip so I'll be buying soon.

After careful consideration (needs not wants), most of my driving is highway. 98 - 99%. Think in town at low speeds and highway. That's my definition. Basically pavement.

When I go offroad, it's the typical forest service roads found out west: bumpy washboard, rocky, sandy (but not beach sandy). Almost never muddy. When I'm in Baja, the same. If it looks too sandy, I turn around or back up.

I hate noisy tires. I don't like noise in the cabin from the tires. I have a compressor so I can air up or down as needed. I don't spend winter in Idaho any longer so I don't need winter tires. I almost never drive in rain. That said, I will be in Alaska for a few months next year. I need tires that can handle warm to hot highways. And potholes. Lots of potholes in Baja. And the rain in Alaska. And maybe the snow and ice getting out of Idaho.

And I don't want to deal with oversize, wheel well issues. As for warranties or road hazard coverage: my past experience suggests that damage will occur in the middle of nowhere so I usually am at the mercy of whatever tire repair shop I can find. If you've been to Baja, you understand. As for tire mileage, it seems that by the time I'm ready to change, I might get a couple of bucks pro-rated.

Lastly, I have Les Schwab, Discount Tire (New), Goodyear and Point S near me. I don't like Big O so no go.

So, any recommendations?
 

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My driving is about 50% pavement, 48% dirt roads and maybe 2% off road. I've been very happy with my 245/70R16 E rated Cooper Discoverer AT3s (They also make a 225/75) and as long as they end up wearing ok (I only have about 10k on them so far) I will be buying them again. They are just a smidge louder than the stock Nexens, but have significantly better performance on loose dirt. Their snow performance has been good, but I'm a bit spoiled as I used to run full winter tires, and that they are not.

If you're not in a hurry, Discount Tire Direct runs a $100 off coupon on Ebay every few months. I managed to get the tires shipped, installed and balanced for under $500 last time around.
 

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I live in CO. Drive mostly on HWY or in town. Then hit the road for a road trip and forest service road etc.

I have had Yokohama Geolander A/T for about 10k miles. Love them. No issues last winter. No issues with noise. No oversize issues. Can get them at Discount so free rotations for life. Relatively cheap. Seem to do it all and they are snowflake approved. I will probably keep buying them as long as they make them.

BTW I have previously only owned 4x4 vehicles so usually burly tires and I would have no issue running these on those trucks/suv. But again super quiet and I still get 20mpg mixed.
 

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I have used those Geolanders on several 4X4s as well. I liked them and they seemed to be a good price amongst name brand tires too. Since I have my secondary leaf spring out of the back I might go with D series light truck tires. I have to believe they would ride smoother?
 

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My usage is very similar to Watercamper, save the Baja. We hit all four corners of the country each year. Alaska included (only one time). I avoid snow as much as I can.

For us low tire noise is essential.

I don’t mind the Nexens, and will likely go to Michelin next change. They have been great on a string of pickups and a Class C over the years.






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I have used those Geolanders on several 4X4s as well. I liked them and they seemed to be a good price amongst name brand tires too. Since I have my secondary leaf spring out of the back I might go with D series light truck tires. I have to believe they would ride smoother?
I would assume they would ride a bit smoother. Noticeable, that I don't know. You are losing some ply and strength right. I don't know if I would make the trade, but I hate changing tires. Also don't forget to check load ratings. They should be good to go, but never know with heavier builds, etc.

I also just quickly looked at Tirerack and I didn't see any D series except one size. Maybe I missed something. I am looking at the G015 version
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Which one?

My usage is very similar to Watercamper, save the Baja. We hit all four corners of the country each year. Alaska included (only one time). I avoid snow as much as I can.

For us low tire noise is essential.

I don’t mind the Nexens, and will likely go to Michelin next change. They have been great on a string of pickups and a Class C over the years.
Lots of Michelins out there. Which is your preferred tire model?
 

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Daily drivers please chime in,
I called a dealer and was told of the Nokian WR C3. He explained that wider tires such as a 245/##R16 are not good in the snow. A winter tire will have a softer compound for the lower temperatures.
What say you?
 

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That is correct, if it is a true winter tire it should have a softer compound. However just like mountain bike tires, softer compound means quicker wear. So are you going to swap them out? If so I would just get a dedicated studded tire.

The snowflake stamped tires are not true winter tires, but are usually all season tires and "certified" to perform in snow and ice conditions. So they will not be as good as true winter tires, but will wear better.

Again, I live in the mountains and had zero issues with my Geolanders G015. Only a snowflake tire.
 

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Hi yourrealdad, thanks for replying to my question. Yes, I plan to swap at the end of the cold/winter season.
In Michigan studded tires are illegal and even if used here, the roads might be dry and clear for weeks. The only part of winter weather in Michigan to count on is grey cloudy weather.
 

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Wow, illegal tires. What is the world coming to. CO is pretty similar. Some snow and ice here and there and then blue skys.

If you have the dough then I would get some snow tires. If not a snowflake tire will do just fine. I have never hear a bad thing about Blizzaks. People love them around here.
 

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Hi KOV, you say after winter ends... Can we use them in winter still as in: is there some grey area in state DOT that allows these?
And, what is it like to drive with studded tires?
Maybe not fully studded but a few so most of the rubber is still making contact.
On a cross bike. I think some studs on the outer or sides of the tread be best so that the tread was still making contact for long distance; ice isn't everywhere.
If I had those on, it might be weeks of dry roads around where I live.
 

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Hi KOV, you say after winter ends... Can we use them in winter still as in: is there some grey area in state DOT that allows these?
And, what is it like to drive with studded tires?
Maybe not fully studded but a few so most of the rubber is still making contact.
On a cross bike. I think some studs on the outer or sides of the tread be best so that the tread was still making contact for long distance; ice isn't everywhere.
If I had those on, it might be weeks of dry roads around where I live.
Here's your answer,
https://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,4616,7-151-12967_52374-205116--,00.html
 

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Daily drivers please chime in,
I called a dealer and was told of the Nokian WR C3. He explained that wider tires such as a 245/##R16 are not good in the snow. A winter tire will have a softer compound for the lower temperatures.
What say you?
I agree with your dealer, less wide for snow and a softer compound for cold temperature. At minus 30 on dry pavement a four season tire is hard as a rock and you realize it is slippery on that dry road! With softer winter compounds you have your traction and better braking. Blizzaks,Michelin X ice and others soft compound,with no real aggressive treads as we fight with cold, ice, hard frozen surfaces on roads more than deep snow. These type of winter tires are quiet and won't last long in hot weather. 7But if you live only a couple of hundred miles south of Montreal I don't see usage for those winter tires, you probably be happy with a good four season or flake stamped tire. I took my Nexxens off and got some Michelin same size LT225 75R 16 E. I love the winter Toyo Observe for my car, it is popular up here to purchase a set of winter tires mounted on steel rims sometimes replacing a four season 16 inch tire on mag wheels with a 15 inches higher profile less wide winter tire on steel wheels no hub caps, but Toyo did not have them in the LT for trucks
 
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