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2021, Promaster 159 HR 2500, Silver
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RecPro RV Refrigerator 3.3 Cubic Feet 12V | Stainless Steel | 15A Draw | Low Power
by RecPro®
Learn more: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B08DL84..._dp_1GPSNSVDVARD8ZA5ACEP?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

I am trying to decide on a refrigerator. I am 90% sure I want an upright one. I found this one on amazon before I heard about TruckFridge. I still like this recpro fridge because of its dimensions. It is only 19" deep and my cabinets will be 18" deep. The TruckFridges are 20" or deeper.

I am not able to read the specifications and glean any valuable information because I have never done this before and I am still learning.

As far as capacity, it will just be me (and dogs) in the van most of the time. For now we will be doing weekends and maybe some longer trips (Maine, Newfoundland, Alaska). I don't mind shopping once or twice a week because I do keto and need fresh food anyway.

If anyone would be willing to check it out and provide input that would be very helpful. Thanks!
 

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RecPro shows 15A Draw, which is a lot. Not sure what a Truck Fridge draws but most chest type DC compressor fridges draw between 3.5A to 5A when running. Have read some posts that suggest Truck Fridge is 2A but that is probably an average of when cycled on and off.
 

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2016 136WB low roof diesel, converted to an RV by Sportsmobile, TX
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The big question is if this a thermoelectric or a compressor fridge. Given the current draw, it may be a compressor fridge, which is really what you want. Thermoelectric fridges are cheap, and have fewer moving parts, but have lousy efficiency and cannot handle a high temperature differential between interior and ambient - they max out at about 40F difference, so if the interior of the van is 80F, the fridge will only be able to get to 40F (and that only after a long time). Moreover, thermoelectrics don't move a lot of heat - put anything warm in and you just spoiled all your food.
But that current number worries me. Even a good compressor fridge shouldn't draw that many amps, and most thermoelectrics run about 5A or so. I wonder if what they have done is run multiple thermoelectric modules, to increase cooling a bit.
I'd say keep looking.
 

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Van #2 2021 EXT
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I agree with the other 2 posts above.

I have just purchased a TF130 but have nit tested the amp draw, but it will be nowhere close 15amps which is huge for a van fridge.

What you want in a can fridge is a BD35 Compressor with variable speed controllers. This will give you the most electrically efficient fridge.

My ARB 50QT runs around 2amps but as it is not constantly on it averages “advertised” 0.87 amps per hour. About 21 ahrs/24 hr period.

Fridge power consumption specs are all over the map - usage & environment changes.

Van building is just a series of compromising decisions, you may want to re-think your cabinet depth or orientation of your fridge to get a more efficient fridge.

I would NOT buy a van fridge that uses 15amps (edit missed the word not)

edit; another item to think about is the install & ventilation space that a fridge will require. I like the TF130 as the compressor & coil are up high in the back right corner;

Info & photos on my new build thread;



73220
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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Hi,
There are more specs on this page: RV Refrigerator 3.3 Cubic Feet 12V Stainless Steel

It is apparently a compressor fridge (good) as it says it has a brushless compressor motor.

It also gives some more detailed power consumption..
How much power does this RV refrigerator use?

Power Draw @ 12VAmpsWatts
Cooling2.5-3.3A30-40W
Idle(When Maintaining Temperatures)2.935
Peak (During Testing)6.680
Rated Max20240


if it actually has an average current draw of 3 amps, that would be 36 amp-hrs a day, which is good.

But, also note its installation restrictions -- not designed for recessed installation etc.

Gary
 

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2021, Promaster 159 HR 2500, Silver
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone! Moving on to a different refrigerator selection. I don't know what it will be yet. Probably a TF. I'm not completely ruling out a chest type refrigerator but I didn't really feel like building a slide for it to be pulled out or build it in with a hinge over top. I feel like the upright would just be a simpler thing to incorporate. I can do basic woodworking but I am trying to really keep it minimal.

Question about chest style refrigerators. Are these powered with a plug that goes into a cigarette style 12v outlet?? Are any hardwired into the 12V system? How do you handle the wires when creating a slide out for it to sit on? I worry that over time the wiring would be compromised.
 

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Thanks everyone! Moving on to a different refrigerator selection. I don't know what it will be yet. Probably a TF. I'm not completely ruling out a chest type refrigerator but I didn't really feel like building a slide for it to be pulled out or build it in with a hinge over top. I feel like the upright would just be a simpler thing to incorporate. I can do basic woodworking but I am trying to really keep it minimal.

Question about chest style refrigerators. Are these powered with a plug that goes into a cigarette style 12v outlet?? Are any hardwired into the 12V system? How do you handle the wires when creating a slide out for it to sit on? I worry that over time the wiring would be compromised.
I built a big drawer for mine, with the cord going out a hole in the back, and so far it slides out and in fine with no cord issues. It plugs into a cig lighter outlet. Could probably cut the cord and hardwire, but I didn't bother.

I like that it opens from the top (no crouching on the floor) and stuffing it full from the top will be easier than from the front so I think it will hold more food per volume.

However, building this big drawer too a lot of time, both design and build. Also, a big drawer sliding into the space feels a bit clunkier than just opening the door. Lastly, it takes more total space, because I need space for the drawer box plus a gap in front to grab and open the handles. So not counting vent space, that's an extra ~2.5"-3" of depth. If you don't want a whole drawer, and rather just do a tray, you could get away without wasting that extra depth.
 

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Question about chest style refrigerators. Are these powered with a plug that goes into a cigarette style 12v outlet?? Are any hardwired into the 12V system? How do you handle the wires when creating a slide out for it to sit on? I worry that over time the wiring would be compromised.
Ours came with a cigarette plug, but we just cut that off and hardwired it. The wires pass through a loop on the top of the cabinet and are zip-tied to the drawer but have enough slack to straighten when the drawer is fully extended. Just make sure they don't rub anything while under tension, or put some shrink wrap or tape over the wires in those areas.

A drawer can be a ton more work, depending on your setup, tools, and style. We really wanted a sizeable freezer in our setup, so that eliminated most of the vertical fridges (they usually have a very small freezer section), but there are multiple options in true dual-zone chest freezers. We did end up having to design our 'kitchen' around the fridge and slide setup, since it dictated the counter depth and such.
 
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