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2015 Promaster 2500 159" diesel
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Discussion Starter #62
No need for sound deadening behind insulation!
I agree, if all the insulation was going to sit perfectly flush on all the panels. I was 100% going to sound-deaden the wheel wells (don't think most people would argue doing that) and the sound deadener comes in set quantities. Not going to not use the rest if I already paid for it. I sound deadened choice sections where I believe the insulation won't sit flush on the body panel and therefore may vibrate. I am not applying more than 50% coverage on the panels/areas I chose to apply it.

There are obviously many folks on the forum who have taken the empirical evidence and theoretical arguments of their peers into consideration and chosen to apply some sound deadener. I am not going to presume either side is right or wrong. And I always appreciate the input.
 

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My wheel wells are buried deep behind cabinets. No sound deadening needed or installed (or really necessary in my build). Every build is different.
 

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mitchel_lee
You should assume KOV is right until I, or GaryBIS, or MsNomer, or ProEddie, or Winston, Nebulight, Chance, afox, RnR, RV8R .... etc........ etc. ......... speak up- and they will.
Sound deadener on surfaces that don’t get insulation - Good. Sound deadener on surfaces that are insulated - Waste of money, time, material, etc. Wheel wells? Mine are insulated on the sides but the tops are not, we store soft stuff there so sound is well controlled. KOV is right.
 

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mitchel_lee
You should assume KOV is right until I, or GaryBIS, or MsNomer, or ProEddie, or Winston, Nebulight, Chance, afox, RnR, RV8R .... etc........ etc. ......... speak up- and they will.
Sound deadener on surfaces that don’t get insulation - Good. Sound deadener on surfaces that are insulated - Waste of money, time, material, etc. Wheel wells? Mine are insulated on the sides but the tops are not, we store soft stuff there so sound is well controlled. KOV is right.
mitchel,,,like RD stated most of the above listed have “road experience”. I drove around in my bare tin can in different weather conditions. Most of the road noise I experienced was in rain @ rear wheelwells. I think it is good to cover the rear wheelwells entirely. If you are putting 1” or 2” of polyiso down you will greatly reduce the tin can effect. Also, the more you build out, the less “hollow” cave effect you will hear. Wheelwells will depend upon your design as KOV & RD stated above.

In my build, It came to a point where reducing road noise starts becoming an item of the front wheelwells, & I have figured have reached the level of ”practicality” with road noise. One can perform road noise reduction for the front wheelwells, but IMO expense/labour & little reduction.

I have not experimented, but also would assume different tires will produce different road noise levels. For me Im going with mileage vs road noise on this front.

Whatever you decide, good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Thanks @RV8R - I do a lot of gravel driving, including a mile long driveway to the garage where I'm doing the van work. It has already muffled the "pings" I was used to hearing from gravel dislodging from the tires. Also going to rubbercoat the exterior underside of the wheel wells. Can't wait to hear how quiet it will be after I get the insulation installed, too, from everyone's insight! Still waiting on the local building supply to source the 3/4" poly. Took a long time to get started, but the pace is really picking up now.
 

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Gravel & the metal floor;

Yes I remember before my floor went down (1” high load XPS & 3/4” BB plywood 5’x10’ & 4’x8’), the “pings”.

The biggest change was the “Dynamat” covering the entire rear wheelwells. My PM had 27kms on itnwhen I purchased the tin can. I remember on asphalt pavement the metal floor pinging & cracking sounds without gravel being thrown up, but from road twisting of the structure. This subsided a bit with more road miles, but became very quiet once my floor went down.

The build outs tend to lessen the road noise. At least it was the case in my build. Now what I hear is the “cargo” rattles on bumpy roads (dishes cutlery etc), now that we are operational and using the van. Even if we could build a silent van, we stock them full of camping gear cause ,,, well that is the point really ??

FYI; I only used “Dynamat” sound cover on the rear wheelwells. I’m in the camp that believes the cost/benefit is not there for areas that get 1” or 2” of insulation & panels. Your cargo will make more road noise if the roads are not smooth.
 

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Yep, once you get all your sound deadened, you'll notice the sounds from pots and pans, silverware, stuff in cabinets, etc!

I really don't like driving in a noisy environment so I have many clanky items in cloth pouches I sew from a harbor freight moving blanket.

My TV mount drove me crazy until I added a small carpet patch in just the right spot to dampen the sound. The top panels on my couch could bounce on a bump and I'd hear a clunk... added some carpet strips between the wood parts to kill that noise too.

During construction, I glued felt to some strips of wood that might rub while going down the road, in a non-visible strip.

Now, driving down the road on a trip, I say to my wife, "did you hear that sound?" and she says, "what sound?"... arrrggghhhh!
 

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Yep, once you get all your sound deadened, you'll notice the sounds from pots and pans, silverware, stuff in cabinets, etc!

I really don't like driving in a noisy environment so I have many clanky items in cloth pouches I sew from a harbor freight moving blanket.

My TV mount drove me crazy until I added a small carpet patch in just the right spot to dampen the sound. The top panels on my couch could bounce on a bump and I'd hear a clunk... added some carpet strips between the wood parts to kill that noise too.

During construction, I glued felt to some strips of wood that might rub while going down the road, in a non-visible strip.

Now, driving down the road on a trip, is say to my wife, "did you hear that sound?" and she says, "what sound?"... arrrggghhhh!
Guys like us proeddie need to retrain ourselves when we hear those sounds. In that we hear “sounds of success“ as we are out there using our camper vans ??



My wife replies to me the same as your wife does to you.

I also have a dog that can hear a pin drop at the refrigerator, but out on the trail he can’t hear a thing if there is a squirrel or something at all interesting.
 

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I don’t think anyone here has said the sound deadener doesn't work just that it is a waste if it is to be covered with insulation. I didn’t put it on my wheel wells even but I think that is a great use for it. The rubberized undercoat might do as much. Let us know.
Jack can hear me open the zip lock with the treats in them when he is 40 feet out on the dog yard taking a poop while I am inside the house with the door closed. In this house you hardly hear lightning! And opening the peanut butter jar brings him from ANYWHERE!
I have to say our truck camper probably had rattling dishes but we never knew. Now those sounds drive me NUTZ.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Finally finished the "upstairs" today - cut eleven 8ft Trex wood composite boards (1" thick, 5.5" wide) with a miter saw. Three center boards make room for the fan, and the rest span the useable remaining length of the Alurack behind the solar panels. The longest span between crossbars is 22", the rest are 18" which is the max Trex is rated for. The 22" span is up by the Maxxfan, which I am likely to use less. It still supports my weight of 185lbs, but does bow ever so slightly. The rest is quite sturdy. Used a small section of PVC pipe and a large drill bit to make countersink-holes for the sheet metal roofing fasteners. Pre-drilled with a smaller drill bit and then drove the screws.

61270

61271
 

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Discussion Starter #78
3/4" polyiso finally arrived at the local building supply. Shopping for plywood this week - looking for 1/2" or 5/8" hardwood ply. Planning to do the insulation and subfloor layers so the seams don't line up. The rear sheet will line up, but that will all be covered by bench seats and a raised center compartment, so I am not worried about compression from footsteps. (see photo below)

Right now I am reading through all the posts about subfloor - I haven't been able to find any good Birch plywood in 1/2" locally. Considering another quality hardwood ply instead - open to suggestions.

Motion Windows scheduled for arrival March 27-29, so I am in a holding pattern until then. Measuring & making templates for the floor with my factory mat and trying to figure out if I can fit 1' or 2" polyiso in the walls and ceiling after the furring strips go up.

61585
 

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Discussion Starter #80
The "hardwood" is relevant only if you’re gonna look at it. Pay more attention to the integrity of the inner plys. Avoid voids.
Thanks for that heads up. A lot of the posts on PMF talk about Baltic birch which I haven’t found anywhere. Is a quality subfloor ply or even sheathing adequate if the plies are of “good integrity”?
 
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