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Winnebago brought the Travato to the Chicago show, here are some high def pictures...

exterior speakers, retractible power awning, household AC jacks and TV. Its meant for two but i think the bed says otherwise...







 

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I've been thinking of buying one of those later this year, or see about a Winnebago Trend which is the class "C" edition that is built on a ProMaster cutaway chassis and is about a foot fatter, foot taller, and four feet longer.

It is a nice unit, and the only ProMaster upfit shipping as of now (late Feb 2014.) However, it has a few downsides. You have to have electricity to run the water heater, some of the seats are a tight squeeze, and there is not much room on the kitchen counter. The bed in the back is OK for one person, and the front dinette does drop and turn into another sleeping surface (which I would guess would require a foam topper so one doesn't encounter the edges in the cushion pieces when sleeping.)

All and all, a nice first entry into the Euro-"B" market in the US. Winnebago had to do some major re-engineering because European campervans don't have generators, nor black waste tanks.
 

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Winnebago brought the Travato to the Chicago show, here are some high def pictures...

exterior speakers, retractible power awning, household AC jacks and TV. Its meant for two but i think the bed says otherwise...

Nice view of one retractable side step design as being questioned in other thread.


Early reports indicate that actual price may be around $70,000, which is well below the list price. Some Class Bs have gotten quite fancy, and expensive. At the Houston show they had an Airstream Sprinter with a list over $110,000 (think it was around $115k). Was very nice on large DRW Sprinter, but price point leaves it with a lot of competition. Many larger RVs are available for less. Even if factoring higher fuel cost (8 versus 18 MPG) there are larger units for similar cost. The buyer must want to pay a premium for the maneuverability and fuel economy. Class Bs are so much easier to drive, can go more places, and most important to me, they are more likely to get driven rather than be parked in one place.

One thing Class Bs also have going for them is that they seem to hold their value well compared to larger units. Other types of units can depreciate quite fast. For $70k I could buy a new Travato, or a very nice used but much larger Class C and have money left over for many years worth of gas.

Still, I'm partial to smaller campers like the Travato.
 

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This is actually amazing. Never been into RV's and rarely seen the interior of one. I have to say this PM RV has a really nice layout.
 

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You just hit on the problem with most class "B"s. The price is hitting the stratosphere. An average unit will go for over six digits, and there are models hitting the $200,000 mark. In Europe, Sprinters don't sell anywhere near as well as Ducatos or Ford Transits, but here in the US, because of the high-zoot name, Sprinters tend to be viewed as a luxury vehicle, thus commanding the high price tag when it comes to upfits.

For me, where I park a motorhome is a big issue due to Austin RV regulations (Austin is having an influx of RV-hating Californians call the city home, so their dislikes are reflected in what the local city council passes.) So, I have a chunk of a driveway, and that's it. This means an "A" is flat out, and even the wider "C"s are not going to work. So, for me, it is a tossup between the Travato and the Trend, both have similar prices, although I'm sure the Trend likely will have a bigger discount due to being a "C", not a "B".

The thing that impresses me about the Travato is the bathroom. For something that is in a van, it is pretty good.
 

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...cut......

The thing that impresses me about the Travato is the bathroom. For something that is in a van, it is pretty good.
Thanks for reporting on this. My wife and I are still waiting to see a Travato in person. We've seen the Trend but not the Travato. Anyway, one of our biggest concerns is the wet bathroom. In pictures it looks very small but I've been hoping it's due to pictures being taken from outside the narrow door opening. Glad to hear it may be better than expected.
 

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I personally am leaning towards the Trend (23L floorplan with a corner bed is what I'm looking at, rather than the 23B where the "main" bed is the drop-down.) The main reason is that if I wanted to take a few other people, I'd still have space for me on the corner bed, while there are still two usable sleeping surfaces. Plus, the corner bed means a nice chunk of storage in the basement... and there are always items that one wants to not bring inside a vehicle (gas cans, macerator pump in a tub, etc.) With the Travato, I'd have to stash those under the flip-down bed, while with the Trend, they are accessible easily from the outside.
 

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.....cut...... Plus, the corner bed means a nice chunk of storage in the basement... and there are always items that one wants to not bring inside a vehicle (gas cans, macerator pump in a tub, etc.) With the Travato, I'd have to stash those under the flip-down bed, while with the Trend, they are accessible easily from the outside.
I would agree that lack of outside storage is a major downside to practically all Class Bs. A few like Roadtrek have added small outside storage in place of driver-side running board. On ProMaster this type of storage may not work as well due to lower floor.

Sportsmobile builds what could be a good compromise by fabricating an inside box that is vented to outside. It's meant for portable generator storage (not running) but could work for gas can and other "messy" items one prefers to keep out of unit. It's expensive for the normal small size, but shouldn't cost much more to make larger.

Of course, there is always the hitch-mounted storage box. When camping I often see different types on smaller RVs, including lots of Sprinter-bases compact Class Cs. When used on van-based Class Bs they often have a swing-out pivot mechanism so rear doors can be accessed.
 

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I saw one Sportsmobile build that had the vented inside box, in combination with the PowerTech diesel generator underneath. The PowerTech generator is shorter than the Onan models, so it works well under a Sprinter, and doesn't hang lower than the axle. With a set of skid wheels on the rear hitch, the generator case is well out of the angle of departure range. I might hit Sportsmobile and see if this is the same with the PM.

With any small RV, if I'm going for a long trip or if I'm going boondocking, I'm definitely going to either have a hitch mounted cargo box or a small enclosed cargo trailer. However, for weekend trips where one is staying at full hookups, it is nice to have a short rig that can park at a movie theater without taking up too many spaces.
 

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I saw one Sportsmobile build that had the vented inside box, in combination with the PowerTech diesel generator underneath. The PowerTech generator is shorter than the Onan models, so it works well under a Sprinter, and doesn't hang lower than the axle. With a set of skid wheels on the rear hitch, the generator case is well out of the angle of departure range. I might hit Sportsmobile and see if this is the same with the.

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The 3KW diesel generator I've seen specs on is about 15 inches tall, which is greater than a gasoline Onan of similar power. If mounted under a standard PM floor I don't think it would leave much ground clearance. If by "shorter" you mean height then I'm not familiar with that model.

One of the things I want to check on the Winnebago Travato is the amount of ground clearance under the Onan -- which I believe is mounted behind rear axle. I also believe an Onan 2.8 KW is around 12 inches tall or thereabouts. I'd like to see how high it can be mounted due to underfloor crossmembers. If it fits between two crossmembers it may be OK.
 

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Thankfully, a gasoline generator is shorter than a diesel, which is the main reason for a class "B" (perhaps a class "C" as well), I prefer a gasser for this task at hand. Those three inches can mean the difference between destroying the genset on a rock or tree stump versus bouncing over it.
 

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Mlts22, are you going to have an issue with HOA's if you go with the class C Trend?
 

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more like meant for two midgets

or two people sleeping ontop of each other - which could be a good or bad thing dependong on who the other person is.

i like the layout though.
 

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Mlts22, are you going to have an issue with HOA's if you go with the class C Trend?
It was changed recently... if the vehicle is under 9000 (the Trend's GVWR is 9350) pounds, it can be parked in the street, and moved every 72 hours. It can also be parked in a driveway as well. This allows people to stash their 45' "A" on a circular driveway.

Of course, making sure that I have 24 x 11.1 x 7.5 feet is critical as well.
 

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more like meant for two midgets

......cut.......
No doubt van campers are small compared to larger motorhomes, but it's all relative. Original VW campers were based on vans with interior volume probably under 150 cubic feet. By comparison, my Ford Extended E-350 van has just under 300 cubic feet of volume behind the front seats. It's huge compared to a VW.

The largest ProMaster with 530 cubic feet of volume makes my van seem small, and a VW camper absolutely tiny. Last week I stood inside an empty extended 3500 and couldn't believe how big it was compared to my Ford.

In my opinion a major issue with modern design is that as vans have gotten larger, manufacturers have just installed more stuff in them because they could, making the van feel almost just as cramped. But that's because most buyers would prefer a wet bath with toilet and shower than a huge bed. For those who want a larger bed in a Class B van camper there are other choices with beds bigger than a queen-size, or one can get a custom layout built by a company like Sportsmobile.
 

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Check this out, it is taller and the awning is mounted inside.



http://www.auto-trail.co.uk/model/vline/620/engine-options
Looks like a fiberglass roof added on top of medium-height-roof Ducato. It's hard to say from pictures, but to me it looks like awning is mounted in a pocket molded into the fiberglass roof. To me it looks mounted outside but flush. Very nice and probably much more aero. And maybe quieter too.

Didn't see a detail picture of awning itself.
 

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I am reminded of the Westfalia Ford Nugget, with the extended roof.

With just the 8-12 inches of space that push the roof to about 10 feet, that can add a lot more versatility. A drop-down bed is one idea. Another is a false floor which would allow for placing black and grey tanks inside the vehicle proper, not to mention plenum ducting to keep those above freezing in winter.

I wish some US company would do that. There are a lot of engineering workarounds Winnebago did with the Travato (the sump pump in the shower, for example, as well as the grey water macerator), that could be solved by moving to a false floor type of system.
 

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I am reminded of the Westfalia Ford Nugget, with the extended roof.

With just the 8-12 inches of space that push the roof to about 10 feet, that can add a lot more versatility. A drop-down bed is one idea. Another is a false floor which would allow for placing black and grey tanks inside the vehicle proper, not to mention plenum ducting to keep those above freezing in winter.

I wish some US company would do that. There are a lot of engineering workarounds Winnebago did with the Travato (the sump pump in the shower, for example, as well as the grey water macerator), that could be solved by moving to a false floor type of system.
Except for the shower drain, can't black and grey tanks go inside van anyway? Low-profile toilets can sit directly over a shallow black tank located inside if that's what you wanted, but there may be other reasons to want it outside. It's not uncommon for smaller RVs like the Class C I owned to have a box built up below toilet. That's where black tank, or part of it, is mounted.

The kitchen and bath sinks are usually high enough that they can drain to grey tank even if mounted above floor. It's the shower that is the biggest obstacle to what you describe wanting to accomplish. And a small pump to pump shower water up to a grey tank mounted higher in elevation seems like a low-cost option. A pump can be installed for under $100 which is cheap compared to a taller roof.

Having said that, I'd like to see RAM offer the European high roof on US ProMaster. It would then be easier to have elevated beds and also elevated bathrooms so tanks could be kept inside for those who want a winter camper. I'm with you on that.

Another option which may be cheaper is to have insulated and heated tanks under the floor. I'm biased towards building "down" instead of up to reduce wind drag, lower center of gravity, and lower vehicle's overall height.
 
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