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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thought I'd share with you what I've found. I've recently installed and wired some corner strobes lights in my van. Location where I wanted to mounted a switch was in the switch bank to the left of the steering column. It appears to have some usual switch blank plates.



These blanks can actually be converted to switches by cutting off two little tabs. Internally there is a small circuit board with two vacant capacitance type switches. Soldering the two top left corner points will get you a momentary negative trigger switch that's low current.



Used this output through a Pac-Audio TR-7 module to trigger a relay and voila..

 

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Great discovery! Now, can you translate it into simple English for us electronic virgins who would like to try this some day and don't know squat?

Thanks again!!
 

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Nice find. Couple of questions -
I assume that a jumper wire is soldered between the two points on the board, correct?
Was the bypass unit necessary in order for the switch to work? Or was the bypass necessary for your "strobes" (not sure what those are either).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Nice find. Couple of questions -
I assume that a jumper wire is soldered between the two points on the board, correct?
Was the bypass unit necessary in order for the switch to work? Or was the bypass necessary for your "strobes" (not sure what those are either).

Well I'm a little embarrassed to say that I did this a while ago. I was posting from memory and for some reason I mentioned a jumper which incorrect. Here's the correct spot to solder to, for some reason I can't edit my first post.



The tr-7 module wash required because I needed an on/off switch. Switch will only activate when pressed. Strobes are installed in the headlights and rear lamps for safety.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great discovery! Now, can you translate it into simple English for us electronic virgins who would like to try this some day and don't know squat?

Thanks again!!
Sure :)

Basically the existing switch will only work when pressed. If you'd like to use the switch to turn something on with one press and turn off with the second press, you'll either have to build a latching relay or the TRIP-7 module that I mentioned. The module can be found at:

http://pac-audio.com/productDetails.aspx?ProductId=717&CategoryID=31

Open that helps.
 

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Thought I'd share with you what I've found. I've recently installed and wired some corner strobes lights in my van. Location where I wanted to mounted a switch was in the switch bank to the left of the steering column. It appears to have some usual switch blank plates.



These blanks can actually be converted to switches by cutting off two little tabs. Internally there is a small circuit board with two vacant capacitance type switches. Soldering the two top left corner points will get you a momentary negative trigger switch that's low current.



Used this output through a Pac-Audio TR-7 module to trigger a relay and voila..

Thank You very very much for that info.
 

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Very Cool! I am curious how you connected to the board, don't all the wires plug in?
I think this would be a great place to use the switch to turn the backup camera on temporarily. Do you have any more information on how to do that. I know I'm asking a lot but you seem to know your stuff ;)

Thanks!
 

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Catalin,

Thanks for the info.... I have a few ideas already!

In your amended info, you say two points, but it seems like only one hole is soldered. Does this button short to ground?

Also, it looks like a total of 5 pads (mode, up, down, extra, extra). So I guess the far left buttons are where the circuit board ends and you could mount real switches in the center of the leftmost "buttons" (that aren't really buttons)

Again, thanks,
Ed

ps. hope it's cooler there.... 90 degrees here!

ps (part 2). Is that switch panel screwed in or does it just pop out once the lower cover is removed? I ask because it took me a long time to get to the center pushbuttons until I figured out there is a screw in the bottom of the not-quite-a-cupholder!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Very Cool! I am curious how you connected to the board, don't all the wires plug in?
I think this would be a great place to use the switch to turn the backup camera on temporarily. Do you have any more information on how to do that. I know I'm asking a lot but you seem to know your stuff ;)

Thanks!
Simply pushed the wire through the small hole by the 'squiggly' traces and soldered right to the board. That spot will supply a low current ground feed that you'll need to trigger a relay with and in turn operate the camera.

Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Catalin,

Thanks for the info.... I have a few ideas already!

In your amended info, you say two points, but it seems like only one hole is soldered. Does this button short to ground?

Also, it looks like a total of 5 pads (mode, up, down, extra, extra). So I guess the far left buttons are where the circuit board ends and you could mount real switches in the center of the leftmost "buttons" (that aren't really buttons)

Again, thanks,
Ed

ps. hope it's cooler there.... 90 degrees here!

ps (part 2). Is that switch panel screwed in or does it just pop out once the lower cover is removed? I ask because it took me a long time to get to the center pushbuttons until I figured out there is a screw in the bottom of the not-quite-a-cupholder!
Hey Ed how are you.. weather has been pretty hot out here for a while. Van is smoking hot in the back.. but it's much better then working in the rain. :)

Yes switch provide a low current ground. Whole switch plate pops out by I believe prying the top portion out. It's quite simple compared to the center bracket.
 
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