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This from Leftlane (12/9/13):

Though the Sprinter 4x4 was originally announced as a Europe-only model, Mercedes-Benz has decided that it will likely also offer the van in the United States.

As its name suggests, the Sprinter 4x4 is a variant of Mercedes' full-size van that has been fortified for inclement weather and off-road excursions with an all-wheel-drive system. The setup features push-button activation and a fixed 35/65 output split between the front and rear axles, while four inches of additional ground clearance further enhance capability.

Those interested in venturing far beyond the beaten path can opt for a low-range transfer case.

In the United States, buyers should plan on a 188 horsepower, 325 lb-ft of torque 3.0-liter turbodiesel V6 mated to a five-speed automatic as the only powertain option. The 2.1-liter turbodiesel four-cylinder and six-speed manual available in Europe aren't likely to make it across the pond.

The Sprinter 4x4 should arrive in U.S. showrooms no later than 2015, according to an Automotive News report. As with Mercedes' other Sprinter models, it will also be marketed under the Freightliner brand.

For the complete story on the Sprinter 4x4, check out the debut article here.


Read more: http://www.leftlanenews.com/mercedes-sprinter-4x4-likely-headed-stateside.html#ixzz2n8PM1sOm
 

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Maybe this will kick Ram in the ass & compel them to make an AWD Promaster.
For those who don't know, there was a Ducato AWD available before 2006.
 

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Here in Europe 4x4 versions of the Sprinter and the Ducato have been available since 30 years ago. They are no new models for us. I don't understand why they dont decided to sell these vans on the US market...
 

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Here in Europe 4x4 versions of the Sprinter and the Ducato have been available since 30 years ago. They are no new models for us. I don't understand why they dont decided to sell these vans on the US market...
Have these been manufactured at respective manufacturing facilities or are they factory-approved aftermarket modifications?
 

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wouldn't the need for a rear diff in a 4x4 end up raising the floor height of the Promaster?
Not necessarily in my opinion. It depends on how it is done.

We've seen double-reduction rear gear layout posted that when combined with independent or deDion rear suspension it takes up little vertical height. Also, minivans and many sedans/wagons with driven rear wheels have lower floor than ProMaster.

Also possible that driveshaft running to back axle may require exhaust and or fuel tank revisions.
 

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They should offer awd or 4x4 on all vans everywhere. Only makes sense. Quigley conversions are too expensive.
 

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Have these been manufactured at respective manufacturing facilities or are they factory-approved aftermarket modifications?
The Ducato/Jumper/Boxer are modified by Dangel that is a French company, but sold by the official Fiat/PSA dealers.
I thought that Sprinter 4x4 is built directly by Mercedes, because Mercedes has a great tradition in matter of AWD vehicles, but I'm not shure.

In the USA maybe a good business for somebody to buy parts from Dangel and set up a Ram Promaster conversion facility...
The Dangel parts are proven and reliable and there are many options of locking differentials, gear ratios and ground clearance...
http://www.dangel.com/Boxer_Jumper_Ducato.html
http://www.dangel.com/index.html?newlg=E
 

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The Ducato/Jumper/Boxer are modified by Dangel that is a French company, but sold by the official Fiat/PSA dealers.
I ....cut.....
Thanks for information.

A major downside to doing a conversion after the vehicle is built is that it costs a lot more. Cost seems to be around 6,000 Euro, or over $8,000 US. By comparison a Honda CR-V can be upgraded to AWD for $1,250. Even if components were upgraded in size, the cost would still be a fraction of the cost. Too much work has to be repeated to be cost competitive when done aftermarket.

May still be worth cost for many, but if OEM it would be an even better buy and would be more popular.
 

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Exactly 6000 €. When I bought my Ducato that's the amount they ask me for the 4x4 version...
Maybe useful for me, but too much expensive.
Probably the demand is too low.
Also Renault has only FWD and RWD Masters...
Probably Ford will sell the AWD Transit on the US market...
 

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Here is an old press release on the old generation Ducato 4x4:
http://www.italiaspeed.com/2005/cars/fiat/03/ducato_4x4/0303.html



I think FIAT keeps the rear differential height low by taking the drive for rear wheels after the front differential. Thereby, the rear differential gear set can be smaller as the driveshaft to the rear runs closer to the wheel rpm's. This requires the driveshafts to be balanced better as they run faster.



 

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Here is an old press release on the old generation Ducato 4x4:

.....removed pictures.......

I think FIAT keeps the rear differential height low by taking the drive for rear wheels after the front differential. Thereby, the rear differential gear set can be smaller as the driveshaft to the rear runs closer to the wheel rpm's. This requires the driveshafts to be balanced better as they run faster.
If that were the case, the driveshaft would run much slower, not faster, in the order of roughly one fourth as fast as typical in RWD vans. Size of rear differential could be smaller since gear ratio would be 1 to 1, but it would have to handle more torque, hence somewhat larger due to that. These two factors combined would no doubt result in smaller rear differential with greater ground clearance.

It's not a given though that Fiat doesn't step up driveshaft speed off front tie-in point by using a gear ratio other than 1 to 1 at that point.

Based on some recent engineering trends on more expensive vehicles, I think AWD will likely evolve with electric drive motor(s) for rear wheels; as part of hybrid drivetrain. Power to normally-non-driven wheels to improve traction in mud and snow doesn't have to be that high since mostly needed at low speeds, and that's when the high torque at slow speeds of electric motors makes so much sense.
 

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If that were the case, the driveshaft would run much slower, not faster, in the order of roughly one fourth as fast as typical in RWD vans. Size of rear differential could be smaller since gear ratio would be 1 to 1, but it would have to handle more torque, hence somewhat larger due to that. These two factors combined would no doubt result in smaller rear differential with greater ground clearance.

It's not a given though that Fiat doesn't step up driveshaft speed off front tie-in point by using a gear ratio other than 1 to 1 at that point.

Based on some recent engineering trends on more expensive vehicles, I think AWD will likely evolve with electric drive motor(s) for rear wheels; as part of hybrid drivetrain. Power to normally-non-driven wheels to improve traction in mud and snow doesn't have to be that high since mostly needed at low speeds, and that's when the high torque at slow speeds of electric motors makes so much sense.
but whats the cost of that going to involve? Its not like FIAT or Chrysler exactly has that type of system lying around....
 
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