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Anyone have any experience with the two part spray on foam kits? I was thinking it might be good for insulating the interior panels between the framing. Is it fairly tough when cured?
 

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Just look for the possibility of a corrosive reaction with metal. Foaming agents used to be corrosive but I don't know what's out there today so read the label carefully.
Also, a dead air space is an excellent insulator if you can stop air movement. Not easy to do but for my money I'd work on sound deadening first, take advantage of what that gives you in R improvement and dress for what's left.
 

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Spray foam.

I purchased a two part, mixing spray foam at home store. It has a long enough hose and sprayed great. We sprayed the walls and ceiling. Very quiet and warm. Don't very afraid to spray yourself. Costs about $200.
 

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I purchased a two part, mixing spray foam at home store. It has a long enough hose and sprayed great. We sprayed the walls and ceiling. Very quiet and warm. Don't very afraid to spray yourself. Costs about $200.
Superplumber_ mi do you have any pictures of how the spray foam turned out? What size PM did you spray?
 

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foam usually dries like a light yellow. its pretty hard when dry and expands very well.

it does add some weight though.

stuff is very sticky. the key is to spray just enough so it doesnt overflow or end up leaving big empty spaces.
 

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OK, thanks for the info, I may have to try it once the weather warms up good, I read that the components need to be good and warm for best volume.
 

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I was considering having a pro doing the job on my PM. did a lot of search on the internet and gave up the idea, since the cons outweighted the pros, in my opinion.

I assume the foam you are considering is polyurethane, the stuff we find in expandable foam.

The cons

- polyurethane, in the absence of flame retardants, are extremely combustible. And very toxic fumes evaporates when it burns.

- hard to remove, should you have the fix the body after an accident.

- since it is expandable, it could deform the body metal when you shoot it inside the side and roof mountings.

- marginally used on recreational vehicles, so little feedback on the long term.

- Good, but not the most effective solution for noise reduction, my primary concern.

The pros

- Cheap. I would have cost me $500 to get it done by a pro.

- Light, so it adds little weight.

So I opted for other options: cork (ceiling), volcanic wool (panels) and dynamat-like stuff for the wheel covers. Will also use at large aluminum bubble paper called Reflectix.

So far, the only thing done if the stuff on the wheel covers that does a great job silencing the noise from little rocks bouncing from the wheel. Wish it could work on my supension bushings. ;)
 

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Just got our Promaster insulated. We will be working on the paneling in the next few days. Not to worried about fire hazard. Have been insulating our vans like this for the last 20 years !
For me, the pros overcome the cons....
Here are a few pictures.


Sorry about the pictures being upside down ! I couldn't figure out how to flip them around !
 

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Hi,
I used a two part foam kit bought at Home Depot on my PM conversion.

My experience is explained in quite a bit of detail here: http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Vehicles/PMRV/Insulation/Insulation.htm

I had never used this PU spray kit before, and really had no problem learning it on the fly -- its pretty straight forward. That said, I'd see what commercial sprayers in your area get -- no point it doing it yourself if it does not save money. But, if you have it done commercially make sure they have done vans before. You might offer to do all the masking and just pay them for the spray part.

I went round and round on the insulation decision and read more descriptions of diffferent techniques and experiences than I want to think about. In the end, for me, it came down to having an insulation layer against the van steel wall that was impermeable to water vapor and had no gaps or seams that water vapor could get through. The reason for this being that I wanted to avoid water vapor getting to the cold van wall and condensing and eventually causing rust. There are reports out there about people redoing a van after several years with fiberglass insulation and finding a lot of rust when they take out the old FG -- I don't think this is common, but it does definitely happen. My own personal feeling (possibly wrong) is that its just not possible to seal any kind of blanket or Reflectex style insulation well enough to keep water vapor from getting through.

I had also looked at a lot of homes after they were sprayed with the same kind of PU foam, and was impressed with how well it fills everything and how solid and impervious it is. Some homes of questionable structural integrity have actually used the PU foam to stiffen them up!

Down sides include the careful work you have to do on the masking and the heart burn about getting it wrong and making a real mess, and the possibility that if you spray a layer that is to thick it may warp the van panels (avoided by just spraying thin layers), and the fact that the coverage is not as good as the kit says it should be (so buy a larger kit than you think you need).

Good luck deciding!

Gary
 

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Gary, I appreciate your feedback and your reasons for choosing spray foam. I do take issue with the fact that neither you nor ProRam sprayed the ENTIRE cargo area of the van. Therefore your comments about no water vapor causing condensation and rust does not apply. I'm a fan of spray foam and believe it's the best to use for insulation but you can't use it as your ONLY insulation material. As seen in ProRam's job only the obvious sections are sprayed with foam. What about the difficult to reach open areas in the ribs and rear upper space behind the cargo light?
 

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That is a problem. As I didn't get the inside of the doors done either, because of the door catch mechanism. But it still makes a big difference in noise reduction and keeping the warm air in winter and the cold air in the summer. I did all the masking before bringing it over to the insulation guy. As he told me most of the job is the masking. (It took me most of the day!) He puts the insulation on in very thin coats, to prevent the sheet metal from waving. He also brings the truck inside a few hours ahead to make sure the tin is nice and warm. We had a Sprinter done a few years ago by a different insulator, because the guy we normally go to was on vacation. We thought he had done vans before but he hadn't. So the sides were all waved and looked terrible. We couldn't do anything about it and had to live with it.
 

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Gary, I appreciate your feedback and your reasons for choosing spray foam. I do take issue with the fact that neither you nor ProRam sprayed the ENTIRE cargo area of the van. Therefore your comments about no water vapor causing condensation and rust does not apply. I'm a fan of spray foam and believe it's the best to use for insulation but you can't use it as your ONLY insulation material. As seen in ProRam's job only the obvious sections are sprayed with foam. What about the difficult to reach open areas in the ribs and rear upper space behind the cargo light?
Hi,
Yes -- I agree that there are places that you just can't get to with the spray nozzles.
I did use Great Stuff (in the cans) to do some of the areas that the spray foam nozzles could not get to -- but there are areas that are not covered.

Also did did the floor with rigid polyiso and I'd guess the seams will let some water vapor through even with Great Stuff to seal them to some degree.

Gary
 

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I sprayed mine as well. To overcome some of the concerns voiced above I:

taped 1/2" rigid to the large flat areas and then sprayed over that to minimize the chance of wrinkling the metal

filled hard to get to voids like the ribs with cans of Great stuff.

Made sure the walls were warm by parking in the sun (turned the van around to spray the other side)

Masked off the door hardware so I could spray the doors.

I got 1-2" of foam out of my kit (200bf kit for a low roof 136), so I added batts over it in the wall areas where there was enough room. As others noted, the masking is very time consuming, and I wished I'd put more time into that. The stuff is hard to get off places you don't want it. The van is much quieter now, without any other sound proofing.
 

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GaryBIS Thanks for the awesome website! The pictures of your spray foam job helped me make the choice to spray foam my new vehicle. Haven't sprayed yet. I bought the foam but then we got cold weather so I have to find a heated shop or just wait it out...

VanShopping I considered the method you described (1/2 rigid to large flat areas) but I would have used spray adhesive instead of tape. Do you have any pics?
 

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GuyT- thanks for the videos.

I stumbled onto a different video where they "test" VERY unscientifically different insulation material's burn characteristics with a blow torch. (yes, a blow torch---- please no welding inside your Promaster RV, folks!)... :)

-NOT scientific, but they burn stuff, so we don't have to.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NC79e0oztM


*** MODS- this is filmed by an insulation company, please remove this post if it violates any rules... Just adding so we all have a "rough" comparison of flammability of insulation options...

thanks,

Jimmy
 

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VanShopping I considered the method you described (1/2 rigid to large flat areas) but I would have used spray adhesive instead of tape. Do you have any pics?
Here's one of the finished spray job, but don't have any of just the 1/2" taped on. I tried the spray adhesive (3M 77) first and it didn't work very well. Tape held it on well enough until I sprayed, which really locked it in.

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Any thoughts on building it up past structure (somehow...?) and then trimming it off like they do on houses flush with studs?
 
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