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OK - I have 5 small surface mount puck style LED Utility Lights that draw 0.02A each. I'm going to mount them in a long row above my countertop in the wood "ceiling".

So - 1 long hot wire and 1 long ground wire. Long means maybe 10' max. The lights have a pigtail of 22 AWG. I was thinking of using 18 AWG for the "long" wires and splicing the lights into the long wires. I would like to be able to pull the light down, disconnect and toss it if it goes out and replace it with a new one.

Some of the quick connectors tap into the long run by pressing a metal piece down to make the connection and have a blade attachment that would allow me to basically plug the lights into the long wires. This seems ideal but I've read a lot about failures, vibration, etc. Hype? Not sure.

I could solder all the connections but there goes my ability to "easily" disconnect the light and replace it.

And there are splice connectors where you basically put it around the long run and insert the end of the pigtail into another hole and squeeze the metal piece down. Again, I've read about all these failures.

My gut says these types of connectors would be fine for this application: super small current, nothing really important, wire won't be strained (they will just be lying above the ceiling board ). I could wrap it with electrical tape if needed or even use heat shrink tubing around the connector.

So - I'm looking for a little guidance. What would you do on your Promaster?:eek:
 

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I did mine the hard way. I cut the positive and negative at each light location, inserted both ends of the positive (ditto on the negative) and crimped both ends in a standard connector. The last light supply wire only had one wire crimped in the connector. Then I crimped a mating connector to the leads for the lights.
 

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I used to have a truck bed that was wired with those insulation-piercing types of connectors and it had sporadic problems with the connections. The wiring was probably 10 years old, so I'm sure there was some corrosion. I prefer more metal-to-metal contact. I'm about to do a similar job and I plan to strip the ends of the wires, twist them, and and secure them with crimp sleeves.
 

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I went with 3m quick disconnects w/ heat shrink for accessible single junctions - a bit pricy, but the quality is much higher than the other stuff I have seen. I used lever nuts for multiple junctions. 3m butt connectors w/ heat shrink for all hard to reach spots. I didn't do any soldering.
 
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