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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've recently completed some van projects and have left over materials. These are must have materials for van conversion and camper van projects. Together they add sound dampening and insulation to you vehicle.

I am located in Portland Oregon and looking to sell this locally, not interested in shipping.

I've set the price at about ½ of retail to move it quickly. PM if interested

45-50 sq ft of FatMat RattleTrap Extreme - 50$. Retail 109$ http://www.fatmat.com/shop/50-sq-ft-rattle-trap-bulk-pack-install-kit-included-6584 Similar to Dynamat or other premium sound dampening products.

18 ft x 5 ft Thinsulate automotive insulation 130$ Retail ~250$
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3M-Thinsula...tive-Insulation-for-van-and-car-/131754566187
 

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Heh. Here in Bend and I just received Fat Mat and Thinsulate last week, or I'd probably take you up on your offer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Anaya,

I've had a few interested parties reach out. If they fall through Ill let you know.

Thanks,
Dan
 

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Sound deadening is a waste of time and money for anyone who plans to fill their van with cabinets, etc. have an empty van - great idea but as soon as you start building it out it makes no difference.
 

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KOV may be right on this one. If the van is empty we jump to the conclusion we need to fix the sound. Insulating does pretty well as Hein keeps reminding us with Thinsulate. Then each time we add a surface, or cover the wheel wells with cabinets or other structure it makes more difference. I took sound readings but not enough to know which things made the most difference. The van is quiet and I did not do any soundproofing with that specialized stuff. I notice the most sound we hear now comes from the front of the cab and front tire wells. I wonder if something there might help more in a conversion than the back. On a rough road the cooking pans are an issue too. FatMat on those?
 

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I agree that sound deadening is a waste of time if the interior is to be thermal insulated and built out. Thermal insulating the wheel well covers and boxing them in does much. Insulating and installing a plywood floor and insulating the ceiling also deadens sound. Interior cabinets do much more. In my opinion adding special sound deadening which is usually heavy mass damping material simply adds unnecessary weight to reduce fuel economy.
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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Hi,

KOV, RD and Seapro may well be correct about specialized sound damping not being worth it, but I'm skeptical, and I've not seen any real data that supports this -- like measured sound values before and after insulation and noise treatment.

It would be quite easy for someone just starting their conversion to measure noise levels in a consistent way before and after adding noise treatment and insulation. If a few people would do the measurements, we would have a better idea how much difference noise treatment makes and whether its worth the time and money.

This is a past post where I suggested a pretty simple procedure for measuring noise levels in the van. -- http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=40721&highlight=noise

More on this page: http://www.buildagreenrv.com/our-co...camper-van-conversion-measuring-noise-levels/

I'd be happy to loan my sound meter to anyone who is willing to give this a try -- just PM me -- free shipping :)

Gary
 

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Decibel 10 from the iTunes store. It even has a calibration feature. Free when I got it. Android has similar apps. The problem as I see it that either you do the sound deadening or you don’t. If you didn't the final result can be measured, if you did the final result can be measured. Perhaps at the First Annual winter meet-up in AZ we can do a same road, same speed final comparison with vans that were deadened and those who converted w/o it? I am sure a comparison during construction will show improvement with the deadener added but finished other parts of the conversion might render that improvement null. How do we test that? Have someone retrofit it after their conversion is done to see if it would have been better? Or have someone tear it out of their completed conversion to see how much it was helping? Gary’s idea is important to understand what is improving the sound level.
 

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hi RD,
I think we could get some idea of the value of the sound treatment if we got before and after noise numbers from a couple people who did the full sound deadener plus insulation plus before and after noise numbers from a couple people who did only insulation.
The absolute noise numbers would not be much use due to variations in the test conditions, but the reduction in noise from bare van to treated should give some idea of the value of the treatment.

Like the idea of doing a comparison at the AZ meetup -- probably the best plan if it can be pulled off.

The stuff I looked up on the smart phone noise meters was not to encouraging - quite a bit of variation when they were tested against a lab instrument. But, the iphone was the best. The Androids are more of a problem (I guess) due to variations in design.

Gary
 
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