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Powderhunds “In any event, once we put a carpet remnant over the floor there was no going back. It was so nice on the feet and we could just pull it out and shake it off when it got dirty. We got a free scrap piece of the felt-backed carpet and cut it to fit around each of our cabinets so it perfectly fit our open space."
We had painted plywood and found it too cold for our bare feet so we cut in carpet, stapled a few times and have not looked back. Warm, comfortable and fairly easy to sweep clean. Who Knew?
 

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Powderhunds “In any event, once we put a carpet remnant over the floor there was no going back. It was so nice on the feet and we could just pull it out and shake it off when it got dirty. We got a free scrap piece of the felt-backed carpet and cut it to fit around each of our cabinets so it perfectly fit our open space."
We had painted plywood and found it too cold for our bare feet so we cut in carpet, stapled a few times and have not looked back. Warm, comfortable and fairly easy to sweep clean. Who Knew?
That seems too easy.....just use nonrubber backed choice....

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This is what I did with my last van. Used a 3M marine glue that was flexible. It held great and provided areas to screw down the cabinets as long as you remember where they are.

In my current van I’m leaning toward through bolts.
Please everyone remember this, all bolts that are through the floor, with nuts and washers exposed to freezing will conduct the cold into the van. I use liquid rubber, approx 4 coats over exposed nuts and bolts
 

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The factory plywood with plastic laminated onto it is glued on to the floor with something like sikaflex.Its only 1/2 inch but its pretty hard stuff maybe marine quality plywood would work .I like the marmoleum idea someone had
 

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I taped 4" zip ties into the factory threaded inserts to locate the floor tie down locations so I could find them from below if I found floor anchors were needed. So far no need at all as the cabinets and bench with batteries and with construction adhesive are working fine.

I made a 1-1/2" 2x4 outline frame construction glued to the floor. Then put 1-1/2" polyiso int othe outline frame which is glued to the floor. Thats all tape sealed to the 2x4's with 1/2' ply glued and screwed to the frame. Its all covered with with Marmolium flooring on top and serves all activites well. We put rubber mats down when skiing and carpet when cruising. Leaving for my 2nd ski trip into Utah and Colorado last year was 35 days this year 45.
 

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Hey there,

Feeling stumped by something that should be simple. How to secure the subfloor (1/2 inch osb) to the van floor. I tried simple self-drilling srywall screws but they just pull out as there is not enough thread 'catching'. Even with fine thread.

Any suggestions? What have others done?
Hey there,

I used 3/4 plywood for it. I'd be pretty concerned that 1/2in wouldn't hold up - and if you're doing carpentry work, that it wouldn't be strong enough to mount base cabinetry into securely.

I cut out cardboard templates to get the fit where I wanted it, transferred it to the plywood and cut it. I used a router to cut in a groove in the edges, used glue and a hardwood spline between to the boards to mate them up. Then I took a 1/2in finish pin nailer after everything was in place and pin nailed the seams every 8 inches or so on both sides of each joint and through the hardwood splines between the subfloor panels and left it to cure as a single bonded piece of sub floor. For the back edge, I took a 3/4 piece of scrap hardwood and bonded it so I had something solid on the back edge, though I did eventually put a protective piece of L trim over it.

From there, I used a forstner bit to make a recess every so often for a T Nut, drilled through the van floor, filed the holes out and painted them with cold galvenizing spray everywhere paint was removed. From there, I used washers, lock washers and red thread lock and shot the bolts up from underneath into T Nuts. I used liquid rubber and sealed over all the hardware on the underside of the van that was exposed and moved on.

Here's the only picture I could find of my sub floor, though I don't have the forstner/TNuts in it yet.

60249


Good luck with your build, mine was quite a journey :)
 

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The cabinets are anchored to the side walls with angel metal and have similar Simpson strong tie brackets into the 1/2" ply or hit the 2x4's 0 movement in 14000 miles. Keep on rolling

I hope it stays that way +++
 

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Powderhunds “In any event, once we put a carpet remnant over the floor there was no going back. It was so nice on the feet and we could just pull it out and shake it off when it got dirty. We got a free scrap piece of the felt-backed carpet and cut it to fit around each of our cabinets so it perfectly fit our open space."
We had painted plywood and found it too cold for our bare feet so we cut in carpet, stapled a few times and have not looked back. Warm, comfortable and fairly easy to sweep clean. Who Knew?
Powderhunds, this sounds pretty amazing, but does the carpet ever get wet from the sink or splatters from the stove? That would be my only concern.
 

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Hey there,

I used 3/4 plywood for it. I'd be pretty concerned that 1/2in wouldn't hold up - and if you're doing carpentry work, that it wouldn't be strong enough to mount base cabinetry into securely.

I cut out cardboard templates to get the fit where I wanted it, transferred it to the plywood and cut it. I used a router to cut in a groove in the edges, used glue and a hardwood spline between to the boards to mate them up. Then I took a 1/2in finish pin nailer after everything was in place and pin nailed the seams every 8 inches or so on both sides of each joint and through the hardwood splines between the subfloor panels and left it to cure as a single bonded piece of sub floor. For the back edge, I took a 3/4 piece of scrap hardwood and bonded it so I had something solid on the back edge, though I did eventually put a protective piece of L trim over it.

From there, I used a forstner bit to make a recess every so often for a T Nut, drilled through the van floor, filed the holes out and painted them with cold galvenizing spray everywhere paint was removed. From there, I used washers, lock washers and red thread lock and shot the bolts up from underneath into T Nuts. I used liquid rubber and sealed over all the hardware on the underside of the van that was exposed and moved on.

Here's the only picture I could find of my sub floor, though I don't have the forstner/TNuts in it yet.

View attachment 60249

Good luck with your build, mine was quite a journey :)
Cjroberts, your subfloor looks amazing. Is that Baltic Birch plywood? What insulation, if any, do you have under the plywood? And what are you using on your wheel wells?
 

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½" is fine, no reason not to use it but I did use ¾" in my conversion just because I like it better. Many just use 1/4“ and are very satisfied with it, although I think that’s cutting it a bit thin.
 

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I avoided the debate between the 1/2" people and 3/4" people.
I used 5/8".
I'm like the Switzerland of flooring.
 

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It’s thicker😏 which means it’s heavier and more solid under your feet.
 

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Hey there,

I used 3/4 plywood for it. I'd be pretty concerned that 1/2in wouldn't hold up - and if you're doing carpentry work, that it wouldn't be strong enough to mount base cabinetry into securely.

Here's the only picture I could find of my sub floor, though I don't have the forstner/TNuts in it yet.

View attachment 60249

Good luck with your build, mine was quite a journey :)
So I'm at the same stage you were in this picture. Getting the flooring cut and all of that was pretty easy and enjoyable for me. I've been doing carpentry my whole life, so that's not hard (and I have a good collection of shop tools), but I've never built out a van before. So that's where the questions lie.

So now I'm really going back and forth with what to do with the floor. I can use the tie down screws to secure the floor and then basic carpentry glue if I want to lock any of them together. I could also pair that with an adhesive to the metal ribs. So I'm not worried about inventing a way to secure the floor.

My question is about insulation. It looks like you didn't put any insulation on the floor and I'm wondering why not and/or how that's worked for you.

Of course I've seen all of these videos of people putting down the PolyIso stuff - and I'm happy to do that. But IF I do that, is it recommended that you just lay it over the ribs and then lay the ply wood over that? I wonder in that case if the insulation (which is fairly rigid) just "compresses" and forms itself into the ribs? I also wonder what kind of noise that makes. It seems like it might cause some unpleasant squeaking sounds, but then again the weight of everything might compress it enough where that's just not an issue.

Finally, I've seen people inserting furring strips (1x2s or whatnot) in the valleys of the floor, then cutting out rectangles of the polyiso and fitting them in there - using flex tape to seal the gaps. Then they place the subfloor atop this. I realize it would cost me another 1/4" - 1/2" of height, but is this a possible recommendation too? Seems like it would still allow plenty of airflow in the valleys since the 1x2s wouldn't take up the entire valley gap.

In short, do you have a recommendation on subflooring insulation? I've got natural wool for the sides and ceilings, but am a little torn on the floor.

Thanks much!
 

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Here's the current progress, btw.

You can see that I specifically cut out a special section for my wet bath so that I get the extra height out of that. There's also a small cutout behind the driver's seat for a Webasto heater.

Also, that's 3/4" sanded birch. It was only like $20 total for that over the cheap stuff. And the weight is comparable, if not a little less. So no biggie there either. The floor is slightly longer than 12' so I wound up having a small gap between the middle and front pieces of subfloor. As such, I shortened the front on by 18" and inserted that smaller section you see. I don't think I'll have trouble smoothing it out. Worst cases I can always add a 1/8th" bit over it in the sections that are walkable before adding the final top layer.

Finally, it also occurs to me that if I DO put insulation beneath the subfloor, then the ability to glue to the ribs disappears. So I'd be forced at that point just to secure the floor using the tie down bolt holes (and some other little tricks).

68300
 

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So I'm at the same stage you were in this picture. Getting the flooring cut and all of that was pretty easy and enjoyable for me. I've been doing carpentry my whole life, so that's not hard (and I have a good collection of shop tools), but I've never built out a van before. So that's where the questions lie.

So now I'm really going back and forth with what to do with the floor. I can use the tie down screws to secure the floor and then basic carpentry glue if I want to lock any of them together. I could also pair that with an adhesive to the metal ribs. So I'm not worried about inventing a way to secure the floor.

My question is about insulation. It looks like you didn't put any insulation on the floor and I'm wondering why not and/or how that's worked for you.

Of course I've seen all of these videos of people putting down the PolyIso stuff - and I'm happy to do that. But IF I do that, is it recommended that you just lay it over the ribs and then lay the ply wood over that? I wonder in that case if the insulation (which is fairly rigid) just "compresses" and forms itself into the ribs? I also wonder what kind of noise that makes. It seems like it might cause some unpleasant squeaking sounds, but then again the weight of everything might compress it enough where that's just not an issue.

Finally, I've seen people inserting furring strips (1x2s or whatnot) in the valleys of the floor, then cutting out rectangles of the polyiso and fitting them in there - using flex tape to seal the gaps. Then they place the subfloor atop this. I realize it would cost me another 1/4" - 1/2" of height, but is this a possible recommendation too? Seems like it would still allow plenty of airflow in the valleys since the 1x2s wouldn't take up the entire valley gap.

In short, do you have a recommendation on subflooring insulation? I've got natural wool for the sides and ceilings, but am a little torn on the floor.

Thanks much!
I'm no expert, but my floor doesn't squeak or move. 1/2 polyiso, 3/4 plywood. No tie downs. No glue. No furring strips. Floating with planned Gaps & Cracks around the edges.
 

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I'm no expert, but my floor doesn't squeak or move. 1/2 polyiso, 3/4 plywood. No tie downs. No glue. No furring strips. Floating with planned Gaps & Cracks around the edges.
Very good to hear that and thanks for such a fast reply! So yea, I can definitely assume that the van would still be very secure without actually securing the floor. The cutout itself is basically "locked" into place given all of the weird curves and cutouts. Paired with the weight of a tiny house over it and the inevitable bits that will be secured to the sides and I suppose securing it is the least of my concerns.

But it's great to hear that it doesn't squeak or make noise. That IS a greater concern of mine. I see that 1/2" polyiso has an R-value of 9.3. I also realize heat rises and so the flooring is probably the least area needing insulation, but it does seems prudent to do it all the same.

Anyway, thanks very much for that reply! If you think of any other suggestions / caveats related to this part of the process, I'd be delighted to hear them!
 

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I think it's just a typo, but 1/2" polyiso has an R value of 3. I might do an 1" polyiso if starting again, but I was trying to save on space and I'll be putting a cork plank flooring over the plywood. This group helped me a lot with leveling the plywood. I went with biscuit joining and it's wonderfully level now!
 

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I think it's just a typo, but 1/2" polyiso has an R value of 3. I might do an 1" polyiso if starting again, but I was trying to save on space and I'll be putting a cork plank flooring over the plywood. This group helped me a lot with leveling the plywood. I went with biscuit joining and it's wonderfully level now!
My mistake! You're absolutely correct. I mistakenly referenced the 1.5" thickness value (which is apparently 9.3), but the 0.5" is indeed 3.1 (according to this page anyways: Insulation Thickness R-Value Chart and An Explanation of R-Value - IKO)

Sorry about that!

The biscuit joinery sounds like a wise idea! I hadn't considered that, but it would definitely help to ensure everything is locked together and level. I may pursue that. Thanks again for that suggestion!
 
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