Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been noticing and really liking the rounded rectangle openings that many have you have on cabinets etc. For some reason feels a bit nautical. I also come from Vanagon/Eurovans and I think much of their stuff uses this geometry.

As we start our final buildout I need some help figuring out how to achieve this. New to routers but I am assuming that is what is used. Looked online and really didn't find anything. Do you just make a template? Anyone point me to a good resource for doing this kind of opening?

Also I know many of you have covered your panels and even your metal framing with material. Any guidance or resources there? Is it a felt or thin carpet?

thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
2014 136” HR
Joined
·
5,705 Posts
The safest way is to make templates. Jigsaw or bandsaw close to the line, then sand to your definition of good enough. Start over if you goof. Then fasten template to final material and use a router bit with a bearing. Hardboard makes an easily sanded template, but take care when routing. I use turners double stick tape to fasten
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,832 Posts
I covered the ceiling with headliner fabric from Joann’s Fabric but it is available on line. 54 inch wide fabric split down the middle does two sections. I just sprayed the polyisocyanurate ceiling with their headliner adhesive and applied it. 3M 90 might have worked too. I used that to cover the styrofoam blocks with scraps of the carpet I used on the floor. Easy and very inexpensive and the ceiling looks great! IMHO No boards or planking or plywood or FRP- what a relief! It would work great for the panels. The carpet would be better for the metal.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,832 Posts
Actually it did not melt the gray foam blocks near the top front of the slider that I covered with carpet. I do agree with KWB though. Test any adhesive before committing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
For rounded openings I used two methods.

After laying out the opening I drilled the corners with a Forstner bit, say 1", the used a circular saw and track guide to saw to the corners. A little hand shaping and I had a nice opening.

When I wanted to have a door left for a cabinet I laid out the opening, then it the straight side with circular saw and guide, then completed fhe round corners with a jig saw. Again, a little hand shaping completed the door. this leaves a gap all around of just over 3/32s, but still okay.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
RD, you have mentioned using the Joann fabrics headliner before. I am wondering how good the ceiling foam work needs to be. My foam job is far from perfect and I am concerned that all the little dips, joints, edge gaps and the holes on the ceiling beams will show through. My fear is that I'll glue this stuff up then realize it looks terrible then rip off the polyiso foil if I tear it out. The other concern is how I would mount the recessed led lights into it. Here is a pic of the ceiling, definitely not perfect.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,832 Posts
You are right those imperfections will show, especially the seams. I recommend this ceiling system but each ceiling Polyisocyanurate strip should be one piece picked at the store for a smooth surface and handled as carefully as you can. None of that is difficult and the sides of the van can be pieced with the leftovers.
There are nice carpets that would work as they would show the imperfections less. KeepOnVanning used a fairly heavy carpet and it would hide everything and looks good. The headliner has a 1/8 inch of foam then the nice flocked surface but I can see a couple of seams and a couple of crinkly places. That being said no one but me has ever commented on it even if I say I should have omitted seams. I can’t think of an easy way to turn what you have to be invisible under the Joanns headliner. Perhaps a layer of some flooring pad glued up first?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top