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I'm a beginner, so please listen to the other people here for serious advise. But I wanted to say, I had a drill and I was really struggling. All the self tapping screws were getting stripped heads and I wasn't breaking through the metal. I figured there had to be a better tool, so I found an impact driver, Dewalt, for $59 @ lowes. It's just 12V, and I guess I wouldn't have bought it had I realized that wasn't optimum, but really it's works great. All the screws go in fine, and I've not stripped a single screw head. It's small so I can get in odd places. And It makes a great sound. I just have the battery & charger it came with but it's lasted all day every day so far. Another tool that's been a godsend is a circular saw (skil from lowes for $39) and I got a kreg rip guide (Lowes, @ $39, and a triangle thing, I forget what that's called, but it was like $7 and it makes for perfect straight cuts. I would go nuts if cut lines intended to be straight weren't straight, a personal quirk. Those are my favorite tools that I use the most. I also use a jigsaw for curved lines.
I should buy an impact driver! I use a drill and I have to predrill all my sheet metal screws.

For straight lines I always just clamp whatever straight thing I have handy to use as a guide. I bought squares and never use them because they aren't square enough. I find measuring both ends of the cut produces perfectly square cuts. Is that kreg thing actually square to within a 16th over a few feet? Nevermind I just looked it up, it's not a square so much as a guide. Looks pretty cool though.
 

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I should buy an impact driver! I use a drill and I have to predrill all my sheet metal screws.
Yeah, the impact dripp was a lifesaver.

This is the square thing: The lip leans against the long side of the stud and the other end you lean the saw against as a guide. This cuts studs perfectly and it makes the workflow go fast. For $7 it's a dream.

I can see how what you are doing does the same thing as the kreg guide.
73237
 

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It’s called a speed square. Pretty indispensable for anyone doing woodwork.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Thank you to everyone for great advice! Since my City Cargo Van is going to be a rudimentary camper -- pretty much a bed with storage underneath on wheels, I am not planning to drill into metal. I decided on Black+Decker 20-Volt MAX Cordless Drill-Driver, mostly because it was on sale at my local Ace plus I had a $10 coupon. It is nice and small. Just got it today, so I hope it works out.
I, too, tend to measure on both sides then put a board or some other straight thing lined up on bigger things like plywood, or just use a straight edge.
Two moves ago, my jigsaw disappeared, so I am hoping not to need one. Already cut my R-Tech insulation for flooring, will use that as my pattern for the 15/32 ply going on top. Going to glue it all down. Problem is, here in the Colorado Rockies at 10,000 feet, it is too cold to glue. Hoping for a warm up soon! Guess I will have to start cutting and laying out my bedframe in my cold garage.
 

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Thank you to everyone for great advice! Since my City Cargo Van is going to be a rudimentary camper -- pretty much a bed with storage underneath on wheels, I am not planning to drill into metal. I decided on Black+Decker 20-Volt MAX Cordless Drill-Driver, mostly because it was on sale at my local Ace plus I had a $10 coupon. It is nice and small. Just got it today, so I hope it works out.
I, too, tend to measure on both sides then put a board or some other straight thing lined up on bigger things like plywood, or just use a straight edge.
Two moves ago, my jigsaw disappeared, so I am hoping not to need one. Already cut my R-Tech insulation for flooring, will use that as my pattern for the 15/32 ply going on top. Going to glue it all down. Problem is, here in the Colorado Rockies at 10,000 feet, it is too cold to glue. Hoping for a warm up soon! Guess I will have to start cutting and laying out my bedframe in my cold garage.
For securing the floor, consider using the holes where the d-rings were. I took one into home depot and the guy helped me find a long enough screw to fit that size threading. It was soooooo easy and very secure. It's the advise I got here and it was great advise. to drill the hole in the right place, I screwed the new screw in the hole and marked the placement on the insulation by pressing it into the insulation, then transferred it to the wood. And I used the washers from the d-rings.
 

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For securing the floor, consider using the holes where the d-rings were. I took one into home depot and the guy helped me find a long enough screw to fit that size threading. It was soooooo easy and very secure. It's the advise I got here and it was great advise. to drill the hole in the right place, I screwed the new screw in the hole and marked the placement on the insulation by pressing it into the insulation, then transferred it to the wood. And I used the washers from the d-rings.
How did you find anyone at home depot to help you? I hate going to Home Depot and Lowes because it takes me like 10 minutes to find something, 20 minutes to find an employee, and the employees never know anything. Basically the opposite of Ace.
 

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How did you find anyone at home depot to help you? I hate going to Home Depot and Lowes because it takes me like 10 minutes to find something, 20 minutes to find an employee, and the employees never know anything. Basically the opposite of Ace.
I went to the girl at the self serve line and she called for help. Today there were employees all over the place, in every aisle. It also could be a girl thing.
 

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I own. 12 and 18v Milwaukee tools. The m12 fuel are better than cheaper 18v tools. But the majority of brand name. Tools are good. I am team red through and through. But that dewalt deal was good.

That being said Milwaukee M12 has powerful tools for contractors. And their stubby impact gun is the best. Ratchets right angle impacts and ratchets. These are also tool you can use with mechanics. The stubby has over 400 ft lbs of break away torque. Not much that can't handle on our promasters.

But as I tell my apprentice's as they are asking with tool to buy.... You can always do a smaller job with a big tool. You can't do a bigger job with a small tool. Buy the full size recip saw instead of the one handed version if you only have one. I buy em all. Yeah I got a problem..........
 

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Just look for the deal dejour. I bought a Ryobi assortment (drill, battery w/ charger, useless flashlight, slightly more useful circular trim saw, and useless detail sander in a nice canvas bag) something like 16 years ago. I got married to a woman with the exact same kit, so then had two drills. I then needed to upgrade to lithium batteries, and it was cheaper to buy a drill with two batteries and charger, so I did. The new style drill is lighter and more compact. The drills have taken all the punishment I can dish out. I've built three homes, two barns, rebuilt a trailer, and built out two vans. All that, and I've used my drills for commercial jobs as well. Sure, if money were no object, I love Milwaukee. But if I lose or break one of my Ryobi's I won't shed a tear.
 

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Just look for the deal dejour. I bought a Ryobi assortment (drill, battery w/ charger, useless flashlight, slightly more useful circular trim saw, and useless detail sander in a nice canvas bag) something like 16 years ago. I got married to a woman with the exact same kit, so then had two drills. I then needed to upgrade to lithium batteries, and it was cheaper to buy a drill with two batteries and charger, so I did. The new style drill is lighter and more compact. The drills have taken all the punishment I can dish out. I've built three homes, two barns, rebuilt a trailer, and built out two vans. All that, and I've used my drills for commercial jobs as well. Sure, if money were no object, I love Milwaukee. But if I lose or break one of my Ryobi's I won't shed a tear.
Well said.

I am too, happy with Ryobi 18V system.
They have a huge range of products in the line.
In addition to several common power tools, I own a vacuum, blower, tire pump and find them very useful in the van.

Just find a sale of tools you want to start with, which includes 4AH battery and a charger. After that, just add the tools as the need arises.

And, yes if funds were unlimited or I needed the tools for constant commercial use I would consider more expensive options.
 

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I suggest reversible drill.....ur choice battery or electric cord....my choice is electric cord as that was all there was and I have just replaced as I go along

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