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Discussion Starter #1
It was only a matter of time before America received its first Promaster based RV, and who better then the staple, Winnebago.



Called the Travato, its a Class B motorhome. Only available with the Pentastar 6. The Travato will do 15-18 miles/gallon. Winnebago claims the Travato is so inexpensive it can be used as a second vehicle, however the price seems to be MIA for now...

Some of the highlights:

  • swivel cab seats
  • LED ceiling lights
  • standard touch screen navigation
  • split dinette
  • rear access double doors
 

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The lovely thing about this is that it has a 9 foot roof, so when you're in it, you sort of feel like you're in a higher end home with high ceilings, but once you look to yours sides it will get depressing, still a great move forward for the ProMaster
 

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The lovely thing about this is that it has a 9 foot roof, so when you're in it, you sort of feel like you're in a higher end home with high ceilings, but once you look to yours sides it will get depressing, still a great move forward for the ProMaster
The 9-ft dimension is exterior height. The inside height is only 6'-3". That's still great for a Class B RV, but will never seem like the 9-ft ceilings in a house. In Europe they have the taller roof of the Maxi model but we won't get those here; at least not for now.

As to width, the ProMaster is significantly wider than other vans, so the feeling of space should be better than any other RV van on the market. It may not be enough for many, but across the top of the van it's dboutful any other van in this segment is as wide.
 

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"so cheap it could be used as a second vehicle"

Show me the person who wants to drive a RV as their second vehicle please. but as an RV the Promaster looks like it does a good job. I can't see why it wouldn't sell, and this is just the first, there could be other Rvs that are made out of the Promaster.

Personally, I've never been one for RVs. At least not enough to ever buy one. I'll do road trips in a car, and I'll live in a house, and I'll camp in a tent.
 

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"so cheap it could be used as a second vehicle"

Show me the person who wants to drive a RV as their second vehicle please. but as an RV the Promaster looks like it does a good job. I can't see why it wouldn't sell, and this is just the first, there could be other Rvs that are made out of the Promaster.

Personally, I've never been one for RVs. At least not enough to ever buy one. I'll do road trips in a car, and I'll live in a house, and I'll camp in a tent.
haha they're crazy to think this could be someone's second vehicle. maybe for someone that lives on the road and has a car to commute around in, but thats a very small population.

when compared to vehicles purposely built as RV's, the ProMaster RV will fail.
 

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I'm pretty sure that's not what they mean by this statement:

"so cheap it could be used as a second vehicle"

Show me the person who wants to drive a RV as their second vehicle please.

......cut......
They are not saying literally that some people would go out and buy a Travato or any other Class B as a second car. That would not make sense if anyone was shopping for a second car.

What I think they mean is that if you own a Class B camper like the Travato anyway, because you bought it for camping, that it can also double occassionally as a second car, thereby eliminating the need to have another car (meaning a third vehicle).

My wife and I fall in that category. We so rarely needed to drive at same time that my Extended Ford camper van can serve to get me anywhere I want to go. Because of that we got rid of our "other" vehicle and kept the van as the "second" vehicle.

If we replace our Ford camper with a larger van like a ProMaster Travato we would indeed use it as a second car provided we can park it at home. If it has to be parked offiste then it couldn't serve as a second car any more than any large Class A or C motorhome.

Also keep in mind that small van campers from Volkswagen have been used as second (and sometimes first) cars for decades. It's not that unusual a proposition if you are going to own a camper van anyway.


I will agree that it is a very small market. Particularly in today's economy.
 

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There are definitely better choices of RVs out there. And I'm not just talking about luxury tour buses. There are RVs that are a bit bigger, and that makes all the difference in a RV.

I don't really think that this is what the ProMaster was made for...
 

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There are definitely better choices of RVs out there. And I'm not just talking about luxury tour buses. There are RVs that are a bit bigger, and that makes all the difference in a RV.

I don't really think that this is what the ProMaster was made for...
Yes, agree large can be nice but it comes at a high price when buying fuel. I had a bigger Class C RV and found I didn't use it that much because it only got 8 MPG on average.

My observation is that the majority of campers fall into two groups. One group are the campers who don't drive very far and like to sit in one place for days, weeks, or even months. Even when they drive far from home they stay put in one place for extended periods so they don't use much fuel. Fuel economy isn't as big a deal for them.

The second group uses their camper as a home away from home while constantly on the move (that would be me). We normally don't stay more than one night at any given campground. Ocassionally we may stay two or three nights at a given National Park but that's the exception. To people like us who drive a lot, fuel economy and ease of driving can be more important.

By the way, I just read this morning that the industry is experiencing a shift towards smaller RVs. Every Class, including As, Cs, and trailers are getting smaller on average. They expect it's due to high fuel cost and smaller families.

Ducatos in Europe make up about 2/3 of all campers for a reason. While we prefer larger RVs in US, these smaller and more fuel efficient RVs based on ProMasters should help the trend towards smaller RVs to keep going for at least a few years. Also, for those who need or want more space, ProMasters will be used for larger RVs than the Travato. Winnebago already has the "TREND" ready to roll out in the next month or two. It's bigger than Travato while still more fuel efficient than typical large and heavy RVs.
 

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Looks convincing and all but what price category would this travato fall under?
Travato base list price shows as $84,039 on Winnebago's WEB site.

The base list price for the Trend is either $88,652 or $89,268 depending on floorplan.

By comparison, Winnebago's ERA Class B which is similar to Travato in overall size (by volume not length) has a listed base price of either $103,391 or $103,520 depending on floorplan.

Please note that for the ERA, the only model actually on market as of today, the price at dealer is discounted significantly. We saw one at Camping World that was $10s of thousands below that $103K price.

In any case, what I take from all this is that the Travato will be much lower cost than a similar Sprinter-based Class B. Obviously it's gasoline instead of diesel, but that's only a $4K option (although diesel not offered yet by Winnebago).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm pretty sure that's not what they mean by this statement:



They are not saying literally that some people would go out and buy a Travato or any other Class B as a second car. That would not make sense if anyone was shopping for a second car.

What I think they mean is that if you own a Class B camper like the Travato anyway, because you bought it for camping, that it can also double occassionally as a second car, thereby eliminating the need to have another car (meaning a third vehicle).

My wife and I fall in that category. We so rarely needed to drive at same time that my Extended Ford camper van can serve to get me anywhere I want to go. Because of that we got rid of our "other" vehicle and kept the van as the "second" vehicle.

If we replace our Ford camper with a larger van like a ProMaster Travato we would indeed use it as a second car provided we can park it at home. If it has to be parked offiste then it couldn't serve as a second car any more than any large Class A or C motorhome.

Also keep in mind that small van campers from Volkswagen have been used as second (and sometimes first) cars for decades. It's not that unusual a proposition if you are going to own a camper van anyway.


I will agree that it is a very small market. Particularly in today's economy.
Yea thats more along the lines of what i was thinking as well... Theres a guy on my street who uses his Econoline camper in the same way. He doesn't use it daily but it definitely doubles as an extra vehicle for that family...
 

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There was a professor at my college that drove a Winnebago LeSharo everyday



We would call him Professor Gonzo after the character in Trapper John, M.D. " Dr. George Alonzo 'Gonzo' Gates" who lived a motorhome in the hospital parking lot.

I don't know if the professor lived in it but he obviously used it as his commuter car.
 
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