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I'm curious to know how everyone has insured their Promasters and what the premiums are like for this van? I know costs vary greatly by state, but just some rough ideas would be great. Please include how it's covered (Business, personal, RV, Etc).

I'm in Michigan and due to our no fault laws and mandatory long term medical coverage we have some of the highest rates in the country for just about all auto insurance. I currently have a Ford E-350 and insure it under a commercial policy as it's primarily a business use vehicle. My soon to be purchased Promaster will be my only vehicle and self built into my full time traveling home. My insurance agent is not so sure he can find a policy to cover it for this use, and neither is any other company I have contacted. :(
 

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We have Allstate. Clean record and 54 years old. Minimum full coverage runs me $180 every 6 months including a rider for my collection of trailers.
 

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Progressive ins. purchased on line. Motorhome class B, Agreed value $44K full coverage, 100K,300K,50K liability, including- roadside, collision-$500, comprehensive-$500, Mexico, uninsured, replacement-$100, etc. $400 pre YEAR annual policy NH resident- note this is not considered a vehicle for homeowners discount but I have another which gets this and homeowners discounted. Clean record 66yo discounts applied.
 

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I have Allstate in Boston. Cheapest full coverage I could find for private vehicle. 64 yo, spotless record. $1,250 per year. Ouch!
Looking for RV insurance, any recommendations greatly appreciated.
 

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I have an RV policy through Progressive. I pay $250/year. This is for a self built RV that is not finished yet.
Same here under $500 year from Progressive for an RV policy full coverage, in NH. My broker just found me a better deal for a bit les from another company if I give them my homeowners also.

Mine would have been about $250 / year if I said I only drive it under 10k a year but it's my daily driver and I have over 45k already in 20 months! I did want to chance it for $250!
 

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I find the above info very interesting. I have my van insured as a regular vehicle with no mention of it being an RV. It is about $1000 a year and appears to be listed as would a commercial vehicle be. Same coverage as my cars.

I have been to Hershey (the big(gest) RV show) and the Big E (Mass big RV show) and have spoken to agents at both shows. Progressive, Allstate, Geico, State Farm were all represented with booths to promote RV policies for show attendees.

At each booth I have asked about insuring my van. As soon as the words "self built conversion van" leave my lips, each and every agent shakes their head and says they don't cover conversion vans unless made by a company like Winnebago, Roadtrek, etc. A number of agents said that I would be able to find agents who would probably sell me a policy, but if it ever came time to collect on a claim, the insuring company would deny it on the grounds of "not company made, not RVIA, not crash tested," etc. I said, "but if an agent sold me the policy, doesn't the company have to back up the deal"... the answer was no. They said it would be denied because the agent sold an invalid policy.

I have also spoken with the companies listed above on the phone, about getting a policy. I explained that the van has toilet, sleeping, cooking facilities. It's always a no-go reply based in the not-company-made-conversion status.

Frustrated in CT,
Ed
 

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If you could find self built RV coverage are there advantages for being insured as a self built RV other than insured personal content value? Can there be problems if you file a claim as a regular vehicle and it is discovered that you are a self built RV?
 

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I find the above info very interesting. I have my van insured as a regular vehicle with no mention of it being an RV. It is about $1000 a year and appears to be listed as would a commercial vehicle be. Same coverage as my cars.

I have been to Hershey (the big(gest) RV show) and the Big E (Mass big RV show) and have spoken to agents at both shows. Progressive, Allstate, Geico, State Farm were all represented with booths to promote RV policies for show attendees.

At each booth I have asked about insuring my van. As soon as the words "self built conversion van" leave my lips, each and every agent shakes their head and says they don't cover conversion vans unless made by a company like Winnebago, Roadtrek, etc. A number of agents said that I would be able to find agents who would probably sell me a policy, but if it ever came time to collect on a claim, the insuring company would deny it on the grounds of "not company made, not RVIA, not crash tested," etc. I said, "but if an agent sold me the policy, doesn't the company have to back up the deal"... the answer was no. They said it would be denied because the agent sold an invalid policy.

I have also spoken with the companies listed above on the phone, about getting a policy. I explained that the van has toilet, sleeping, cooking facilities. It's always a no-go reply based in the not-company-made-conversion status.

Frustrated in CT,
Ed
Dear Frustrated in CT - I'll send you link on where I got my policy from later on today
KOV
 

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My CONVERSION is covered by an "agreed upon value" ($50,000) policy from Foremost Insurance. $866 a year, 72yo, excellent driving record, Kentucky. Covers all the usual stuff plus some RV specific coverage for contents, towing, awning, solar panels, fans, trip interruption and liability/medical for visitors.

Not the easiest to find but I finally went to a independent agent and told him what I had - he found the coverage. If you want this kind of policy it's very important that you are upfront about it being a DIY conversion. The Foremost underwriter who had to specifically approve the coverage was impressed that I could provide a video "tour" of the finished conversion - he looked at the video and said "no problem".
 

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I find the above info very interesting. I have my van insured as a regular vehicle with no mention of it being an RV. It is about $1000 a year and appears to be listed as would a commercial vehicle be. Same coverage as my cars.

I have been to Hershey (the big(gest) RV show) and the Big E (Mass big RV show) and have spoken to agents at both shows. Progressive, Allstate, Geico, State Farm were all represented with booths to promote RV policies for show attendees.

At each booth I have asked about insuring my van. As soon as the words "self built conversion van" leave my lips, each and every agent shakes their head and says they don't cover conversion vans unless made by a company like Winnebago, Roadtrek, etc. A number of agents said that I would be able to find agents who would probably sell me a policy, but if it ever came time to collect on a claim, the insuring company would deny it on the grounds of "not company made, not RVIA, not crash tested," etc. I said, "but if an agent sold me the policy, doesn't the company have to back up the deal"... the answer was no. They said it would be denied because the agent sold an invalid policy.

I have also spoken with the companies listed above on the phone, about getting a policy. I explained that the van has toilet, sleeping, cooking facilities. It's always a no-go reply based in the not-company-made-conversion status.

Frustrated in CT,
Ed

This is exactly what my agent told me. I sell stand up paddleboards and kite equipment for a living and I carry samples to show dealers. My agent told me if I had any work equipment in my van, my claim could be denied if I didn't have a commercial policy. He said it is better to be safe than sorry. I pay about $50 more per month for a commercial policy, better to err on the side of caution. If an accident did happen and I had a standard policy, non-commercial, with the amount of gear I have in my van it would be very hard to tell the claim adjuster the 10 SUPs, 5 surfboards and 12 kites are mine without them looking it what I do for a living, especially if the equipment had to be "totaled out".

I couldn't image having my claim denied and loosing my $35k investment in my van over an extra ~$50 a month. It took me talking to about 6 different agents to finally get my answer, some said no commercial policy needed but the majority said they wouldn't take a chance.

Some companies like Geico, who insured my previous vehicles for the last 12 years, would only allow my van to be insured as a commercial policy and they were going to drop me if I didn't change my policy. Since the van title is registered as such, this was the only way they were going to insure me. They wanted about $280 per month in Florida, so I shopped around and went with Progressive which is about $135 per month.

My local insurance guy is pretty honest with me, which I like. He said, insurance agents are just salesmen who have no financial or legal obligation if your policy isn't correct. They just steer you in the direction of what you should choose. Ultimately, once you sign you take on the risk of whether your policy is correct or not.
 

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Can anyone explain if they are not registered as an RV, what did you register your van as? In Oregon the PM is just over the weight limit and must be registered as a truck, like all the Supercab p/u's out there. This is a lot more expensive to keep registered in Oregon...
 

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Can anyone explain if they are not registered as an RV, what did you register your van as? In Oregon the PM is just over the weight limit and must be registered as a truck, like all the Supercab p/u's out there. This is a lot more expensive to keep registered in Oregon...
In CT, they do not have an RV registration type, so mine is registered as a "combination" vehicle. That means business or personal use but not "commercial". Because there are only 2 seats, I can't register it as a "passenger" van, but if you have a pickup truck with 2 seats, you can register it as "passenger"..... My Corvette is also registered as a "combination" plate because I transferred the plate from a pickup truck many years ago, and decided it was unique to have a car with combo plates!

Because I can't register as a passenger van, I can't drive it on New York "parkways", which only allow passenger vehicles.

In CT with my combination plates, I pay based on weight, so it costs more. On CT "parkways", you can't drive a truck with a GVW over 7500 pounds. My PM is rated at 8900 pounds GVWR (note the "R" here), but I carry less than 7500 pounds, so..... it may turn into a discussion with an officer at some point >:Dthe discussion being, "it's RATED at 8900, but my Gross Vehicle WEIGHT is less than 7500." Calls to State Police offices about this have resulted in mixed responses!

Ed
 

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Can anyone explain if they are not registered as an RV, what did you register your van as? In Oregon the PM is just over the weight limit and must be registered as a truck, like all the Supercab p/u's out there. This is a lot more expensive to keep registered in Oregon...
Each state has its own idea of what these vehicles are registered as. In my case - PM is registered in South Dakota and they show the vehicle type as "auto" and that's what I insured it as until I completed the conversion. After the conversion I wanted it insured as a RV and switched to Foremost Insurance, because USAA wouldn't insure a "conversion". Foremost doesn't even mention PM on the policy or insurance card, the make/model shows "custom". Also, since my PM in garaged in Kentucky (only place I have a legal address) that determines the cost, but neither South Dakota or Kentucky seem to care what it's insured as, only that I have insurance.
 

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Back to the insurance issue....

I took the info from KOV's advice and filled out an online form from the contact he provided. I listed it as a 2014 Ram Promaster. When they sent back a quote, they changed the vehicle to a 2014 Winnebago Travato!

I emailed back and explained it was a Promaster not a Travato. The response was that I should send some pictures and they "would see what they can do". Of course my van is not complete so I'm not sure if I'm going to send what it looks like now (half-done), or wait for a few more finishing touches. Meanwhile, a look ate the Progressive website specifically states,

"A class B camper van has the following characteristics: Built by the factory for camping purposes with sleeping, kitchen, toilet facilities, 110 volt hookup, fresh water storage and an extension roof.
  • All features are installed by the RV manufacturer.
  • Does not include conversion vans.
So, we'll see how it works out once I decide when to send some pics....

Thanks, KOV!

Steve, I may also follow up with Foremost... it seems like they have a lot of agents in my area that sell Foremost and it may be worth a visit to see it I can get a "custom" policy quote. Thanks.



Ed
 

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Can anyone explain if they are not registered as an RV, what did you register your van as? In Oregon the PM is just over the weight limit and must be registered as a truck, like all the Supercab p/u's out there. This is a lot more expensive to keep registered in Oregon...
Mine is just registered as a personal vehicle in NH. In fact as far as I know very, very few vehicles in NH have commercial plates and I'm always surprised when I do see a vehicle with them . Most heavy trucks, taxes, vans all use the same plates as cars.
 

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Oregon it goes by weight. If you are over 10,000 lbs it is a 'Heavy Motor Vehicle' (also known as T plates). The confusing thing is Oregon DMV is vague about whether the GVWR or GCWR is used. The PM GVWR is under 10k lb, where as the GCWR is over 10k lb.

So if the GCWR is used, a diesel PM is 12,500lb. That equates to an annual registration fee of $438(!). Compare that with a 2 year passenger vehicle at $86, and a 2 year motor home registration of $201 (in Oregon you only need permanent sleeping and cooking facility to qualify for Motorhome reg).

Here is the confusing language that Oregon DMV has on what qualifies as a passenger vehicle, can anyone figure out whether this means GVWR or GCWR????
Can anyone from Oregon chime in - do you have passenger or heavy T plates????

Passenger vehicle registration is generally issued for a motor vehicle when:
Its design and main use is to transport persons;
Its registration* weight is 10,000 pounds or less;
It is not required by Oregon law to be registered as another type of vehicle, or prohibited from being registered; and
It meets federal standards for highway use.
Heavier passenger vehicles:
Pickups or SUVs that are 10,000 pounds or less registration* weight usually also qualify for passenger registration, however, those that are over 10,000 pounds must register as a heavy motor vehicle (T plates), and if a passenger-plated vehicle's registration* weight temporarily exceeds 10,000 pounds, it may qualify for operation with a Registration Weight Trip Permit.
It is illegal for a passenger-plated vehicle to pull a heavy trailer, or to operate at a registration* weight over 10,000 pounds, unless it is operating under the appropriate trip permit.
* DMV registration weight is the total empty weight of all vehicles in a combination, plus the total weight of the load carried on that combination of vehicles, not including the weight of these trailing vehicles:
Campers
Fixed Loads
Light Trailers (loaded weight of 8,000 pounds or less)
Manufactured Structures
Special Use Trailers
Towed Motor Vehicles
Travel Trailers
 

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It's GVWR only


Here is why

The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) is the amount recommended by the manufacturer as the upper limit to the operational weight for a motor vehicle and any cargo (human or other) to be carried.

The Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR) is the sum of all GVWRs for each unit in a combination-unit motor vehicle. Thus, for single-unit trucks there is no difference between the GVWR and the GCWR. For combination trucks (truck tractors pulling a single semi-trailer, truck tractors pulling double or triple trailers, trucks pulling trailers, and trucks pulling other motor vehicles) the GCWR is the total of the GVWRs of all units in the combination.
 
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