Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying to gather all of the components needed to start installing the wiring in my 2017 PM and have drafted a proposed wiring diagram for the system, which is designed to get electrical (DC and AC) power from three sources. I'd really appreciate everyone's thoughts on my design and if there are any potential flaws or issues with the design.

Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Assuming those 6volt cells are AGM or FLA lead acid, that represents both a large and heavy item. Are you 'hoping' to run that air conditioner from the batteries? If so, don't.

Interesting that you've placed your vehicle and house battery cut-off switches in the negative line. No reason not to . . . but most tie all of their negatives together and place fuses and switches in the positive side.

You caught our attention with that double throw switch. Seems clumsy and old-fashioned in view of the many available combo inverter/chargers that do this switching function automatically.

Noticed that you've divided your AC loads with the air conditioner and the "DC Charging Circuits" powered through the WFCO. What are the "DC Charging Circuits" and why haven't you wired all of your normal AC loads through the WFCO? The WFCO operates like your home circuit breaker box and is intended to distribute 'breakered' power to 5 branch circuits. Shouldn't your 'double throw switch' select AC power from either the inverter or shore power and feed that power to the WFCO which, in turn, will then distribute it to all your AC load?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I had planned to use the double throw switch to bypass the A/C circuit and the WFCO's built in converter/charger when using the pure sine inverter to supply 120v to the distribution panel. I know there are inverter/charger systems available that have a built in switch but I got a really good deal on this 2000 watt inverter so I'm trying to make it work in this system.

I haven't looked at the WFCO's breaker panel yet, but I'd hoped to be able to route the power feed for the branch circuits through the 30a switch to select either shore power or inverter power to run through the breakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Winston is right that an invertor / charger could handle the switch from shore power to inverter automatically.

But we had a sail boat that used a manual switch to choose between shore power or generator that worked but it wasn't a seamless operation like Winston describes.

I think a potential problem is the WFCO. I'm just guessing, but if you connect the WFCO to the inverter output it will try to charge your batteries at the same time with the built in convertor / charger.

Maybe instead of the WFCO you need a separate DC breaker / fuse panel, a separate AC breaker panel and a separate battery charger if you want to use the inverter you have.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,838 Posts
The 3 pole-double throw switch will work and can do the proper ground connection. Electricians are taught not to switch the ground ever but in an RV with shore power and a generator or inverter you need it. Use the WFCO (I like mine) and the switch. I use my inverter so seldom I just plug into it. If I wanted outlets from it I would instal them as double receptacles labeled Shore and Inverter. Please understand I’m a caveman electrician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
We have a 3-in-one inverter-charger, which does the work of 3 individual components: inverter, AC-powered battery charger, and auto-transfer switch. The latter auto-switches the AC source (shore or inverter) to the AC distribution panel. I think that's essentially what you are trying to do with your manual switch, which is fine. Perhaps a wiring diagram for a generic 3-component system would help. This one focuses more on the AC side and doesn't show the DC distribution panel drawing from the coach batteries. To be safer, you can also install a separate AC main breaker on the shore power input (e.g., BlueSea 8077).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My PM doesn't have the upgraded alternator. I figured an 100 amp fuse would be fine for this setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
The alternator will rarely if ever put out what it is rated at. I have the upgraded alternator and have had a 150 amp fuse, which I believe is overkill so I'll likely bring that down to a smaller amperage.
Somebody here once quoted FCA specs indicating the 220A alternator has a max output of 150A. Cap, is your wiring or isolator itself too small to handle 150A? Otherwise, why reduce it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Somebody here once quoted FCA specs indicating the 220A alternator has a max output of 150A. Cap, is your wiring or isolator itself too small to handle 150A? Otherwise, why reduce it?
I probably read the same thing that said 150 hence me having that size now. Yes, if everything else is capable then a 150 would be a good size. Ihave that before my house battery, but need to add another fuse at the starter battery. I'm sketching up a wiring diagram right now that I'll post up to see what I need to change and can do better(more in depth than my hand scribbled doodles).

I've found most wiring diagrams either having items I don't in my basic setup so and many that aren't detailed enough by not showing the wire gauges and fuse sizes.

It would be great if we could sticky some basic diagrams for the main type setups.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
I've found most wiring diagrams either having items I don't in my basic setup so and many that aren't detailed enough by not showing the wire gauges and fuse sizes. It would be great if we could sticky some basic diagrams for the main type setups.
Yeah it would be nice, but basic (generic) diagrams aren't able to show wire gauges and fuse sizes because everyone's physical layout (wire lengths) and unique component specs (amp ratings) are different. Sadly, we still have to look up wire gauges and size fuses ourselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
I think my system is pretty much what you're looking for. My final diagram listed in the final post of this thread should be what you're looking for. The only thing I haven't done that you want is hook my batteries up to the alternator. I'll do this eventually but don't really need it.

http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=66666

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
I think my system is pretty much what you're looking for. My final diagram listed in the final post of this thread should be what you're looking for. The only thing I haven't done that you want is hook my batteries up to the alternator. I'll do this eventually but don't really need it.

http://www.promasterforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=66666

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk
Josh, I printed yours out, thanks. It will give me more info to go off of, and yes it's a little closer to mine than I"ve seen before. Ive been researching and have all but finished a diagram, but the software is a trial and has watermarks all over it so I guess I"ll find another one thats free to use. I'll check out your build thread to see where everything is located for cable/wire run lengths. It seems that when I look at peoples diagrams and then at a diagram often their gauging isn't right with what the website recommends, but I'm absorbing it all.

Another thing I'm learning are the small things like where does the solar charger ground to... You have the same Victron 75/15 as I will be using and show it being grounded to the battery. I figured since I won't have a load hooked to it then it wouldn't need to be hooked up to the battery negative shunt since there would be no power outgoing to monitor, or do you need it hooked to that to monitor the incoming power?

I want to try and find a nice simple shore power converter/charger to hookup. I may hookup an inverter later, but I don't plan on having any AC loads at this time. I'll check out your build and see what you're using.

I still think we could sticky some basic layouts giving the location of certain items to get people started if they had wire gauge on them, but doing this research is one way to help people learn and become familiar and comfortable with their electrical setup. If anything, just how things connected would be great if using a shunt or not etc. I'm rambling....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
Another thing I'm learning are the small things like where does the solar charger ground to... You have the same Victron 75/15 as I will be using and show it being grounded to the battery. I figured since I won't have a load hooked to it then it wouldn't need to be hooked up to the battery negative shunt since there would be no power outgoing to monitor, or do you need it hooked to that to monitor the incoming power?
Not sure what your asking. What do you mean by "won't have a load hooked to it?" I don't have a monitor so I don't know how it's wired if you do but if you don't have one, it's neg to neg terminal and pos to pos terminal unless I'm missing something?



Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Not sure what your asking. What do you mean by "won't have a load hooked to it?" I don't have a monitor so I don't know how it's wired if you do but if you don't have one, it's neg to neg terminal and pos to pos terminal unless I'm missing something?



Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
Did you hook anything up to the "load" terminals on the solar controller? I believe I'll need to run everything through my battery shunt (for monitoring) when I purchase one so I want to setup any working for that initially.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
Did you hook anything up to the "load" terminals on the solar controller? I believe I'll need to run everything through my battery shunt (for monitoring) when I purchase one so I want to setup any working for that initially.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
I'll look but I don't think I did.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Somebody here once quoted FCA specs indicating the 220A alternator has a max output of 150A. Cap, is your wiring or isolator itself too small to handle 150A? Otherwise, why reduce it?
Hey Steve/Winston et al, I'm finally wiring this week and one of the issues I'm trying to wrap my head around is the issue of power from the van battery/alternator back to the house batteries. In my case I've ended up with the house battery bank ([email protected] 6V Matrix AGM 225Ah) behind the drivers side rear wheel well.
My sales guy at Solarwholesalers.ca was saying the current in that line will likely only be a function of the state of charge differential between the starter batt/alternator (220A rated, 150A max output as previously discussed) Thus, not likely to ever have large current flow. 'Likely' being the operative word IMHO. I am using a Blue Sea ACR to tie the two systems together.

Now one thing I considered is that there may be a rare occasion that a boost from the 'house' to the starter is needed. To my mind this would be the only time a significant current flow would exist, not the daily charge current that would be topping up the house from the alternator. Am I out to lunch on this logic?

So given the above, then the wire size and circuit protection at each end of this front to back run should be to provide brief draws to run starter motor? Or perhaps it's more prudent and safer to simply wire for a recharge of the starter battery from the house and avoid any 'direct' use of the house batteries for starter motor function. Does this make sense? Said solar sales guy seemed to this a run of 2awg would be plenty as any starter motor usage would be very short duration, ie. 5-10 seconds.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top