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Discussion Starter #1
Mercedes Metris Forum

I was about to order up a Promaster City to use as a small delivery vehicle, with the possibility of adding refrigeration. Now I see (if I wait) for a few dollars more I can get a Mercedes Metris. Larger inside...assembled in the US.
Comes pretty well equipped inside.
Since I may insulate and refrigerate, the extra room would be nice.
It will cost more up front and likely cost more to work on.
 

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Interior longer

I believe the rear cargo is about 20" longer.
Details here:
http://www.mbsprinterusa.com/future-models/metris

We need delivery this summer, so may buy a temporary used rig and make final call in October when they come out.

My local Ram dealer still has not had a cargo City for me to see.
They have had one Wagon version only.
 

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This van has a low floor for a rear-wheel-drive van. Must be using an independent rear suspension.

Floor height must be in the range of +/- 20 inches based on overall height minus maximum cargo height. That's impressive, making it in same ballpark as FWD ProMaster.

It's interesting that M-B has an RV option for Sprinter cutaway chassis that uses a heavy-duty IRS. If not for cost it could spread to larger vans.
 

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I predict the metris will be as unreliable and overpriced as all the other benz products. Not to start a flame war or anything, but who would pony up low 30s for the metris when they still make the caravan for low 20s?

Maybe soccer moms want it. If so, youd have to compare it to the T&C, honda, and toyota products - all of which will blow it out of the water for thousands less.

Maybe its a commercial buyer. Again, when its speced out, you could have a pm or transit for thousands less. Or a chevy/gmc van for less.

If the metris sells, it will just shine a spotlight on people who buy solely for the badge.
 
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Willing to consider it

For the extra $4-5K on the base model there is some value.
More load capacity, larger engine, 20" longer floor cargo length.
The base electronics (cameras, parking assist etc) are usually
more than a $2,000 option, not that I would get more than the backup camera.
And it is to be assembled in the US, they say.

Granted the Ram C/V is a much better value but if you like Promasters, Transits etc then you like European.
 

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...but who would pony up low 30s for the metris when they still make the caravan for low 20s?...
I really wanted to like the Caravan but after trying one out I couldn't bring myself to buy it. Transmission and AC wet both subpar. Then there's the not quite long enough for 4x8 sheet goods problem. And, it's also lower than it needs to be. Metris appears to be the same interior height as E-Series and Savana/Express. Lots of Benz hate here, but my US made ML has been one of the best vehicles I've ever owned. I would definitely pay more for the Metris over Caravan especially given the extra room it provides. However, if it's only available from Sprinter dealers that will probably kill it's chances of success.
 

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....cut.....

If the metris sells, it will just shine a spotlight on people who buy solely for the badge.
I also disagree. The Metris specifications are quite different than those of any minivan.

The much-higher Gross Combined Weight Rating is in same range as standard Transit and ProMaster, which gives it a tow rating almost as high too; and certainly much higher than any FWD minivan. I think this is truly a mid-size van with decent payload and tow capabilities.

With an interior height that matches Econoline, low-roof Transit, and Express, I can see the cargo version being used for weekend camper conversions while still being fully garageable and able to tow small camping trailer for longer outings.

Yeah, price is steep and maintenance costs questionable, but I see a lot of content beyond the Mercedes logo. Just wish they offered the higher-roof model here too. Plus there is a longer version of Vito that only comes in low roof -- may show up in US eventually. In any case it's not a direct replacement for minivans in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mpg

Any guess what the Metris will get for mileage.
My guess with the weight it will be just a little better than
Promaster (full size) get...around 20 combined.
I bet they bring the diesel eventually and with their SUV's
the diesel versions (GLK is one) are priced about the same as gas.
 

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Any guess what the Metris will get for mileage.
My guess with the weight it will be just a little better than
Promaster (full size) get...around 20 combined.
I bet they bring the diesel eventually and with their SUV's
the diesel versions (GLK is one) are priced about the same as gas.
I would also guess around 20 MPG combined based on a very rough comparison to Ford Transit.

Although it's not required by EPA, Ford media stated that low- and middle-roof Transits tested at 14 city, 19 highway, and 16 combined for both 3.7L and 3.5L engines.

To go from 16 TO 20 MPG average requires a 25% improvement which is quite significant. But since the Metris is narrower, lower, lighter, and has a much smaller 2L engine, I would expect 25 percent improvement to be in right ball park.

I'd also expect average MPGs similar to my older Honda Odyssey. Although the Metris is a little taller and perhaps a little heavier, the smaller 4-cylinder engine should make up the difference. And I get around 20 MPG average.

Just a guess though. We'll know soon enough since EPA rating will be required due to its weight class.
 

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Chance,
I respectfully disagree. For the last 50 years, you could only get one sized van - GM or Ford (and Dodge) - that's all there was. As of the PM and Transit introduction 2 years ago, you have vans that are much larger than the conventional (PM and Transit), much smaller than the conventional (PM City and Transit Connect). So if the Metris is mid-sized, it will have to compete with the soccer mom minivans on the passenger end and Chevy Express/Econoline on the commercial end.

Seriously; you'd have to be out of your gourd to choose the Metris over a Chevy van for commercial use, and equally out of your gourd to choose a Metris over an Odyssey for passenger use. By the time you click some boxes on the order form, the Metris will be TENS of thousands of dollars more expensive than it's rivals in either market.

Of course, if you only really cared about the badge, then you would choose the Metris. That's my point.

(if it comes across that I'm a Benz hater, then I'm guilty as charged. I have been burned by Benz products in the past, and frankly I blame them for running Chrysler into the ground. Then there's that whole war thing, but I should probably get over that!)
 

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Chance,
I respectfully disagree. For the last 50 years, you could only get one sized van - GM or Ford (and Dodge) - that's all there was. As of the PM and Transit introduction 2 years ago, you have vans that are much larger than the conventional (PM and Transit), much smaller than the conventional (PM City and Transit Connect). So if the Metris is mid-sized, it will have to compete with the soccer mom minivans on the passenger end and Chevy Express/Econoline on the commercial end.

Seriously; you'd have to be out of your gourd to choose the Metris over a Chevy van for commercial use, and equally out of your gourd to choose a Metris over an Odyssey for passenger use. By the time you click some boxes on the order form, the Metris will be TENS of thousands of dollars more expensive than it's rivals in either market.

Of course, if you only really cared about the badge, then you would choose the Metris. That's my point.

(if it comes across that I'm a Benz hater, then I'm guilty as charged. I have been burned by Benz products in the past, and frankly I blame them for running Chrysler into the ground. Then there's that whole war thing, but I should probably get over that!)
I respect your opinion, and you may be right.

I'm just thinking that based on size alone, it fills a void. I've seen the baby versions of Transit and ProMaster vans at auto show and they are tiny. On the other hand the Metris is about the size of the original Econolines; which grew over the years.

I find it interesting that even as a RWD low-roof van, the interior headroom is higher than Econoline and Express. It's in same range as low-roof full-size Transit. Yet at well below 7 feet it's garageable.

Mercedes can add appeal by importing/building the FWD version with more room, or add AWD. In Europe they have 3 lengths, although it seems they've dropped the high-roof version.

You may be right and it may flop big time. Personally I hope not because competition drives costs lower for similar products.
 

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Ive been in europe and England for a over a month now, see many versions of vans of all sizes from VW,Fiat and MB. MB has a small van the size of the pro master city, It looks like a rebadged fiat d.
 

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As far as I'm concerned these are not official ratings yet, but if the numbers are indeed anywhere close to 20/28 or 21/30 city/highway for passenger or cargo vans (respectively), then they will affect both Transit and ProMaster sales.

And in my opinion not only the Connect or City versions, but also the smallest versions of the full-size models.
 

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Ive been in europe and England for a over a month now, see many versions of vans of all sizes from VW,Fiat and MB. MB has a small van the size of the pro master city, It looks like a rebadged fiat d.
It is the Mercedes Benz Citan, that is based on Renault Kangoo (and it is manufactured by Renault).
Opel Combo instead is based on Fiat Doblò / Ram Promaster City and manufactured in the same plant in Turkey.

In Europe sales for every van in the size of the Metris are sold around 3 in the size of Fiat Doblò (in Europe the standard Doblò version has the shorter wheelbase that is not sold in NAFTA).
The "problem" with vans in Metris size is that they are too big for city use and at the same time are not as big and too close in price of larger vans like Fiat Ducatod Transit, ....

There are also the smaller vans than Fiat Doblò Ram Promaster City like Fiat Fiorino and largers than Fiat Ducato / Ram Promaster like Iveco Daily (that is RWD, body on frame nd with most engines hat are of the same F1C family of 3.0 l diesel Ram Promaster).

 

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Stopped by my local MBZ dealer yesterday to check out a CV Metris. Spent a few minutes with it, here's my list in a completely random order:

Pros:Seats and the dual arm rests,cargo area with optional built in sliding tie down rails from the factory/dealer,steering wheel tilt angles,sliding door closing and opening smoothness, HVAC controls,ingress and egress. Although the seating position is higher the seats aren't as far inside the cabin as the PMC so you don't have to "fall" in,covered under seat storage and also the open storage behind the partition and below the seats in the cargo area. While they don't claim this as " cargo area" there is at least 3-4cubuc feet there. Storage pockets on top of the dash, inside the dash and inside the centre console. Column shifter frees up space for legs where the PMC's console shifter would live. Heated seat button on the door where you can see it, stereo isn't a complete piece of junk. Spare tire..what!?!
I also think you can spec out front parking assist and some pretty nifty electronic nannies that the PMC doesn't offer, step in height of the cargo area.

Cons: Dash plastics are very cheap, really not MBZ quality at all and Ive worked on everything from a CLA to a GT to a G wagon. Seriously unimpressed with the fit and finish of the head unit bezel.
Sterring wheel doesn't telescope, just tilt and extra cost for leather wrapped. No overhead storage bin (could be subjective) oh and of course the one everyone cares about, the price. Storage in doors is no where near as much as the PMC and it only has two real cup holders. Despite there being a hole ontop of the dashboard that could sort of fit a paper cup. Partition is solid steel on both sides, seat backs are plastic and when in the furthest back position hit the steel and could possibly create some unwanted NVH. Im not 100% sure if this was an up fitter installed or factory installed part though. Mirrors are shorter with no blind spot mirror. Probably better for fuel economy and they look better but people need to see whats beside them and behind them especially when towing.

Subjective pros and cons
Styling looks great with the painted bumper, without it painted the grey plastic they chose is pretty unsightly. Gas filler tube is very low, if you are tall you definitely have to bend down to get the nozzle in. However its right next to the driver door so you don't have to guess where to park when to fill and its easily accessible, it also doesn't open without the door being open, some simple anti theft is always a pro.
Since its wider inside there is a large area between the seats where one could install an aftermarket centre console,I wish MBZ would've put something there but some might want their own thing. Headlight switch on the dash vs the turn signal stalk. Maybe its just me but I've turned my headlights on plenty of times while indicating a right turn.
Rear doors open to 90 and then flush with the body but they are confusing to unlatch and don't feel as sturdy as the PMC ones. No weird 70/30 split so you can open either door but if you have them with glass there is a beam right in the middle where you would look out. Handle is on the right side because well, we drive on the right side of the road and more people are right handed. Apparently FCA didn't get this memo when they decided to put the handle on the left side of the rear doors, only good for you lefties out there.

Thats my quick and dirty review, didn't test drive it but I did give it a good once over. Would I buy one, absolutely. Ive worked on the NV200,PMC (obviously) Transit connect first and second gen, Sprinter, PM, NV3500,astro van,express and econoline and Transit so i've seen pretty much everything out there for north america.
One thing I really liked about the Metris is that its based off of a pretty decent people mover called the V class which has an AMG option. If you wanted to upgrade anything in your Metris, you can simply buy V class parts or even Metris passenger van parts.Plus Brabus...if you really want to dish out the coin and make your van something people will remember.
 

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This is just my personal opinion,based on my own GDI experience,with two cars.I don't like them at all.For mostly in town driving,IE: low speeds etc,the valves do load up,and it doesn't take long either.Best way to clean it is with high test,and some good hwy miles,then you'll feel the engine smooth out,until the next time.One of the biggest deciding factors for me in buying the rpcw was the port injection.Even with low speed/rpm's,the engine stays happy.I got rid of my gdi,but my wife still has hers,and there is a difference.Oh yeah,we both run tier one gas,not the cheaper crap except costco,they only sell tier one fuel,if ya didn't know.I run Texaco/Shell/ and 76.
 
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