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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're heading into our first winter with our 159 HR PM. Roads are no problem in Eugene, but we're frequently up in north Idaho visiting family. The last of the drive includes gravel roads that are plowed semi-frequently.

I think I've done what I can to be ready. Looking for any ideas I haven't thought about.

The first thing we did was swap out the factory tires for Toyo AT3s. They drive great and look much beefier. I did SumoSprings front and back when we swapped tires.

I have Thule/Konig snow chains for the front, 2 traction boards, a tow strap and D rings, and a 12v air compressor if we need to drop tire pressure.

Any other suggestions? Thanks!

Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire
 

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Would be curious to know if you think the AT3 introduce any "side swish". I've been convinced to stay with commercial 10-ply for their high sidewall strength.

As for Winter suggestions, I would really recommend chaining up on all four wheels. It is ridiculously easy to have the rear end move out on you in black ice conditions. There's nothing more sickening than listening to the rear end making contact with the highway barriers. :(
 

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That's a great idea. Thanks. I test-fitted the Thule chains, and I'm impressed. Nice chains.

I'll report more on the AT3s, but so far they handle great. No wandering like the KO2s I have on my Dodge truck, and side-stability seems fine (although I also added the SumoSprings, so lots of changes and noticable differences all at once).

I'll add more after I get more miles on them.
 

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I'd add a bag of sand/salt mix and a shovel. Nowadays I run away from the cold screaming, but when I lived though decades of Michigan Winters a plastic tote full of sand and small shovel helped me get out (And get others out) of many a bad situation.
 

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2016 136 HT Gasser
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Make sure your windshield fluid is winter rated, carry a l-o-n-g handled ice scraper and an extra set of wipers. +1 about what @JohnnyRambles said about a small shovel for your toolkit.

Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
 

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2019 159 EXT HR (3500) in WA
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2014 Ram Promaster 2500 159" diesel
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Not everybody has a fully stocked camper van so the must haves for winter are, even your city car needs these. A sleeping bag, 2pr string knit gloves doubled up, knit hat, extra socks, extra shoes, rubber boots, thermal shirt jacket, water, food. When all the other goodies fail to get you unstuck these will keep you alive for a while. It doesn't take long for that unknown blizzard to bury your van or car.
 

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Make sure your windshield fluid is winter rated,
It used to be that it all was -- until years ago when I learned the hard way that CA now requires all washer fluid sold in the warmer parts of the state to be the kind that does freeze (for environmental reasons) when I was up in Tahoe and went to wash the brown snow kicked up by lead cars and had INSTANT ICE, couldn't see a thing... scary!

You can't even buy the non-freezing kind in the lower elevations, so you either have to buy concentrate and mix it yourself or buy it when you get to higher elevations.

 

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That's a great idea. Thanks. I test-fitted the Thule chains, and I'm impressed. Nice chains.

I'll report more on the AT3s, but so far they handle great. No wandering like the KO2s I have on my Dodge truck, and side-stability seems fine (although I also added the SumoSprings, so lots of changes and noticable differences all at once).

I'll add more after I get more miles on them.
I had the Toyo Open Country ATs on my van for a couple years, drove in snow a few times but had dedicated snow tires for winter. Recently decided to switch it up and bought a set of Falken Wildpeak A/T3W and a set of Konig chains.

I will disagree with @diytech. You don’t need chains on all 4 tires, with chains on the front you will only be able to drive 25mph anyways so your rear end should not be drifting at that speed in a front wheel drive vehicle.
 

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2017 2500 HiTop 159 Cargo Van white.
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It used to be that it all was -- until years ago when I learned the hard way that CA now requires all washer fluid sold in the warmer parts of the state to be the kind that does freeze (for environmental reasons) when I was up in Tahoe and went to wash the brown snow kicked up by lead cars and had INSTANT ICE, couldn't see a thing... scary!

You can't even buy the non-freezing kind in the lower elevations, so you either have to buy concentrate and mix it yourself or buy it when you get to higher elevations.

A bottle of isopropyl alcohol in the washer fluid should keep things from freezing.
 

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2019 ProMaster Lexor
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Would be curious to know if you think the AT3 introduce any "side swish". I've been convinced to stay with commercial 10-ply for their high sidewall strength.

As for Winter suggestions, I would really recommend chaining up on all four wheels. It is ridiculously easy to have the rear end move out on you in black ice conditions. There's nothing more sickening than listening to the rear end making contact with the highway barriers. :(
I saw these last winter and they seem easy enough. MICHELIN 008317 Snow Chains, Easy Grip Evolution Group, 17, Set of 2.https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B074P8B...colid=3J35711NJN1UO&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1
Check on your size. Price not to bad as well.
 
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