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We do not want a build in stove top so been investgating all the familiar camping stoves
Coleman
Primus
Partner steel..pricy.. field look. but quality
Any others ?
We cook and eat out side alot but want something that looks nice and cooks well on the counter inside
May use adapter for small gas bottles
 

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LOOKS NICE? Really. Buy butane, get the canisters at Costco/Sam’s really cheap. Mine is perfect and ugly:
But pretty can be bought:
 

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I have the coleman 2 burner propane......did not know about butane before reading on the board....on 3rd bottle on 3rd year but 1st 2 bottles not empty yet.....use the small bottles which should be stored upright for safety....use 7-8 inch frying pan and small covered pot.....also use small slow cooker electric.....followed MS nomers suggestion on electric water boiler for coffee....i have used coleman all my life.....lanterns & burners with white fuel and propane....prefer propane which can be found pretty much everywhere

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No one noticed that pretty stove cost 0ver $3800!! You are not following my links!
 

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I think butane is the way to go for a portable inside and outside stove. Single or double burner available for low cost. Butane fuel is available at many locations and very easy to store extras. Only issue is that for external use, you may need to have an additional windscreen set up as the stoves are not shielded at all for windy conditions.
 

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I think butane is the way to go for a portable inside and outside stove. Single or double burner available for low cost. Butane fuel is available at many locations and very easy to store extras. Only issue is that for external use, you may need to have an additional windscreen set up as the stoves are not shielded at all for windy conditions.
yes this is true of these stoves. I made up a simple fold up windscreen (out of an old aluminum sight I found at the dump) with 2 fold out wings. It works great and takes up no space. Butane is not as efficient below freezing unfortunately but I try not to cook outside in freezing temps and it’s far cheaper than 1# propane cylinders.
 

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Well, I can think of 2 other potential concerns with butane in addition to cold use and how easy it is to blow out:
1. As you use more gas, the pressure drops markedly. As the pressure drops, it takes a lot longer to heat, and the flame blows out easier. So you are left with a decision of disposing of a partially full container or trying to use it up to the end but waiting a long time for anything to heat up.
2. Where/how to recycle used canisters while on the road.

We have an onboard propane stove with a small tank (in a sealed box with an exit hole should there be a gas leak). Have to refill the propane every 6 weeks or so of travel, at a cost of a few dollars; I'd consider that cheaper than butane. But we also carry a small gas one butane stove that we use to cook outside or in case of a propane problem (which has never happened). I do like it and would consider it a benefit to be able to "put the stove away" and claim more counter space after cooking. Another advantage of butane over propane is that it doesn't seem to stink up the area the way propane does.
 

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My scheme using the old 2 burner Coleman removable from the "kitchen"wall to outside table/bench either on a bottle or the PM's propane supply (Propex heater) .
Ball valve QD to bottle adapter to OE Coleman regulator to stove . Outside can use bottle or propane hose from under van QD to OE Coleman .
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I have the Gasone Butane / Propane stove for the exceptionally rare occasion when I would use a stove to cook. No issues at all in the two times I have used it in the 3 years I have owned it.

I just don't cook much other than using the microwave, but even if I did, I really like the single burner butane stove. I have a similar butane grill that I use much more often at home (or more precisely at softball tournaments to cook hotdogs). Butane canisters are just much lighter and easier to deal with, which is an advantage both in the van and at softball tournaments.
 

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yes this is true of these stoves. I made up a simple fold up windscreen (out of an old aluminum sight I found at the dump) with 2 fold out wings. It works great and takes up no space. Butane is not as efficient below freezing unfortunately but I try not to cook outside in freezing temps and it’s far cheaper than 1# propane cylinders.
You can refill the 1# propane bottles from the larger ones you need to get an adapter and chill them in your freezer first
 

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I've used and abused (on multiday raft trips) a Coleman Classic for 30 years. For the van, we upgraded to a Stansport Outfitter at double the price of the Coleman. We do what you want, mostly inside cooking, heating water for showers.

But when it's hot, outside we go. The old Coleman was made better. For example, the burners were held in with a large nut. No problem to report for all the years we used it. The burners on the Stansport are held in with a #8 screw. One has loosened on us such that it has to be re-tightened periodically. We know it's loose when we start seeing a yellowish flame. Nothing major but good to know - we complained to the mfr with our first Stansport (one burner loosened) and received a new one promptly. And one burner screw has loosened on it. Same one. Go figure.

Now that I am home, I'm trying threadlocker and if that doesn't work, JB Weld. As for use, they both work well. The Stansport has a piezoelectric starter while the old classic doesn't. But wet or arthritic hands make the piezo difficult to use at times. And of course, they both suffer with knob creep - the inability at times for the flame to stay where you put it. I've read of a simple fix. Just undo the knob and clean out the mfr's grease and re-lube with a pure silicon grease. Never got around to doing it.

That's the only 2 stoves that I have experience with. Both cook well. Simmer well. High heat output when needed. Wind screens are easy to move when using a big pot or pressure cooker. The Coleman takes up less room and is half the price. Not sure if it is still as well made.

Another plus for propane is availability. We live in Baja most winters for 4 to 5 months. I've never seen butane but maybe it's available somewhere. Propane fill stations can be found near most major cities. Our usage (summer or winter) is about 20 lbs per 2 months.
 

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Another plus for propane is availability. We live in Baja most winters for 4 to 5 months. I've never seen butane but maybe it's available somewhere. Propane fill stations can be found near most major cities. Our usage (summer or winter) is about 20 lbs per 2 months.
That is why I went with the dual fuel model, just in case availability every was an issue.
 
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