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It is interesting that MY ’17 had a few holdover MY ’16 sales of diesel but the new sales must be MY’18 diesels not many but since there is almost no information on buying a diesel it is as expected. Perhaps they go to fleet only?
 

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I was speaking with someone at a company that outfits Promaster vans for mobility use, i.e. wheelchairs, shuttle bus, executive limo, etc. He had been told by his rep in FCA that the window van was for fleet sales only and that both engines would be available for fleet buyers.

I'm not sure what the reasoning is behind that thought except that maybe the local dealer would have an actual trained diesel mechanic since there is a guaranteed local customer with multiple diesel units.
 

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It’s no wonder Ford is is first place with such dumb merchandising on FCA’s part. Window van only for fleet sales? No interior or seats? These idiots are loosing out of a whole market demographic with this stupid corporate decision.
 

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Ford is in first, third and fourth place, and Chevy/GMC is in second place. I'm actually surprised that the Promaster outsold the Sprinter, but I suspect if the 4 cyl diesel was available in the Sprinter then the Sprinter sales would have been higher.

FCA has the opportunity to make a real dent in the market and refuses to for some reason. They need to step up and provide a Crew Version and a passenger version.
 

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FCA has the opportunity to make a real dent in the market and refuses to for some reason. They need to step up and provide a Crew Version and a passenger version.

Diesel and an AWD I would buy another.
 

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In Europe, if you add Fiat, Peugeot and Citroen versions, I think the van is the best seller. Here the new Transit seems to be not so successful...
The Ducato-Promaster is the most rational van on the market. I don't understand why the don't sell all the versions in USA...

Inviato dal mio Nexus 6P utilizzando Tapatalk
 

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FCA has the opportunity to make a real dent in the market and refuses to for some reason. They need to step up and provide a Crew Version and a passenger version.

Diesel and an AWD I would buy another.
If we are putting together a wish list, I’d like to see one of the major van manufacturers offer a wider van platform, in the range of 88~90 inches total width.

A little extra width wouldn’t be that much harder to drive, and shouldn’t affect fuel economy that much, but would make camper van conversions so much roomier. Work vans with shelving would benefit tremendously as well.

Vans have grown in length and height, but are still limited to +/- 80 inches which is too restrictive. We need van options nearly as wide as dually pickup trucks.
 

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Our small experience in Europe led us to see there is more tolerance for wide vehicles there. The unwritten “rule” seemed to be the vehicle going uphill has the right of way when the road is too narrow to safely pass and everyone respects this in the most civil and considerate way. I see many instances here that someone tries to out maneuver my wide van to force me to give way even if I am rightfully able to proceed. We are just to aggressive and in the “Me” frame of mind. You see this in merges all the time. A wider van would put us at an even greater disadvantage and unlike the truck drivers we are not likely to give way. I am 5’7” tall so the interior width of 74+ inches is a good compromise. I am just happy it is not narrower.
 

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There are some nuances of driving etiquette and it varies from country to country. As an American I felt the most at home in Germany-- the proportions and road behaviors are similar. I didn't drive much in France and none in Italy, but the driving there seemed a notch or two less civil. Outside of the rural areas, the Netherlands and Belgium were very closed-in. I didn't care much for the drivers in Austria and from what I hear the more you venture into the former eastern bloc, the worse things get.

As far as van width goes, I'm thinking more about the parking and delivery side of the eurovan equation. This is decidedly tougher in Europe than in the States in those older cities with very narrow streets.
 

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While we are wishing, realize that most vehicle platforms are sold worldwide. Which leads to design complexity and compromises.

Seems more surprising as narrow as roads are in Europe, that the Ducato is as wide as it is.

Ducato vans aren’t that different in outside width. The walls are thinner so they provide much more interior space — thanks to FWD.

A large number of European Class A motorhomes are 225 mm wide, or around 88.6” outside dimension. Just saying that if a major vehicle manufacturer made a much wider van, there would be a huge market for it. Granted, it wouldn’t be for everyone, but at least in US I’m certain there would be a demand for both recreation and work.

By the way, before the Sprinter, Mercedes had the much wider Vario van in Europe and other markets. It was successful but old school in that it was based on truck design. It was discontinued as Sprinters became more popular.

Today there are wider vans in India and China, but they are too crude in design to be imported to US in present form. Below is picture of larger Mercedes Vario window van, which also came in cargo, 4WD, and other configurations.
 

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It took me a while to find a good picture (and to recall the company name) of the Wide One, which was the American version of a wide Dodge van manufactured/converted for 20 years or so. The cost of such a conversion had to be extreme, yet were used (granted in small numbers) for various applications like ambulances, hotels, etc. These guys widened the van all the way from front to back, including axles, dash, windshield, etc., so it was a massive task.


For RV use, various companies like Leisure Travel, Pleasure Way, and RoadTrek also widened Dodge, Ford, and Chevy vans, but left the front of the van and chassis original, and widened the body from the cab back (often transitioning behind side doors). The cost compared to The Wide One had to be much less, plus interior cab finishes remained at OEM standard.


Considering how much expense these companies committed to these vans just to gain extra width, I think a factory van that was a little wider would have much appeal to some buyers. They couldn’t replace standard vans, but there must be a market for +/- 90” wide vans that would feel more like a small Class A or B+, or make roomier hotel shuttles, parcel delivery, or for contractors, etc.
 

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