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Also when I saw him explaining the problem in the picture my eyes rolled, IMO the fuel line should have an up hill run from the pump to the heater. He created the problem, that's the problem.
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@travelvanvan I got my Espar (2mm) fuel line from P&R Truck Centre here in Victoria. They ordered it from someplace in Van. It wasn't cheap ($18 for 10ft plus $15 shipping). Take a sample of your rubber fuel hose into an auto parts store and ask for fuel injector-style hose clamps of the appropriate size. They look similar to the ones you have, but way beefier. While you are at it, you might try replacing your rubber fuel hose with better quality rubber fuel hose. I'm betting a combination of higher quality hose clamps and rubber hose should do the trick. Page 26 of the Espar D2 Installation Manual shows max distances for the fuel pump that should allow you to mount it under the hood, if you want.

@phil I only upgraded fuel line because I read some folks had the supplied stuff fail on them. It was worth it to me not to maybe have to mess with it all a second time. But yes, the green flexible stuff that came with the unit grips so well you might not even need clamps.

@gdpetti the outer surface of the heater doesn't get super hot, nothing like its hot air output. Ours is a true 2kw unit (4.5" tall) tucked under the 6.5" tall mezzanine step directly behind the driver's seat. It's in a space 21"x21" with one side open for cold air return/intake, which also helps dissipate heat.
 

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How much space above it? You say 21" around it, but above? I've seen some install them under the seats of the older Sprinters with those flat metal sides, with the unit's recycled air in a corner... and that looks to be a bit less than 21"... so as long as there is air able to circulate, right?... but in my case, how much is enough space above it?

Also, I see that I can poke out the wires in the connector to the pump, so that isn't a problem, just a small drill hole for the 2 wires. I think I can use the same hole I drilled for the fuel line to go under the van, no?

PS... in that video by the Aussie, I think Phil is right, he created that problem on purpose for demonstration purposes if I remember correctly.
 

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Just saw RD's heater pics under that step....sort of similar to me putting it under my bucket/toilet setup besides the slider door, which I won't use much, preferring the back door as an enter port.
RD's setup has space around the sides, but much less above it... so as long as there is room for air to flow around it, right? Would an inch above be ok? Isn't that about what RD's placement of his heater have? Looks about right. Does RD have anything else under that step besides the heater? I'm wondering about the spacing requirements.... needs to prevent any overheating of the unit.
 

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Warning, just an observation,
I looked at the video, most installs I've seen in vans have the heater located on or near floor level and the fuel tank level to or higher than the heater. So from what I've seen there is no reason to use a small bore hard fuel line, (as he said), also the flexible hose would seal better.
Also I have not observed any issues with air bubbles and the rubber pulsing, I think he's over thinking it.

Again just an observation.
:)
Yes, my tank is above the heater too and so the flexible line should be fine from the tank to the pump as there's no real pressure. From the pump to the heater though, there is pressure and I found his argument about the flexible hose being a shock absorber (expanding outwards on each pulse) convincing enough to get the hard nylon line kit.

Also when I saw him explaining the problem in the picture my eyes rolled, IMO the fuel line should have an up hill run from the pump to the heater. He created the problem, that's the problem.
View attachment 65925
I see what you mean and I agree that he did create his own problem. My pump is below my heater and so there is a nice path up to the heater and no bubbles would form like in his example.

@travelvanvan

@phil I only upgraded fuel line because I read some folks had the supplied stuff fail on them. It was worth it to me not to maybe have to mess with it all a second time. But yes, the green flexible stuff that came with the unit grips so well you might not even need clamps.
My own experience with the flexible green hose shows that it degrades after a while. I used it when I bench tested my heater with kerosene. After the test, it sat for over a year with the kerosene in the hose and I see that it's now noticeable harder and a bit discoloured compared to when it was new (I have rest of the new hose to compare it with). Maybe this as bad as it gets and it's stable from this point on (i.e. won't fail), but it made me feel better that I got the nylon line.
 

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Air bubbles are mostly caused by cavitation small line opening into a larger line. The reason for the hard line is an attempt to eliminate the bubbles by butting the hard line up to the fuel pump, filter and such but the line must stay straight at the butt or you create a void at the bend and you get cavitation. I have the green flex line and you can see the bubbles form and it has no effect on the operation of the heater. I took the fuel filter out of the mix so there is one less area for cavitation. I do have a 15' run of hard line and the green is for final hook up. No clamps no leaks. I also have black nylon hook up on one for over a year no problems and just used it today, the green is coming up on a year.
 

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Just saw RD's heater pics under that step....sort of similar to me putting it under my bucket/toilet setup besides the slider door, which I won't use much, preferring the back door as an enter port.
RD's setup has space around the sides, but much less above it... so as long as there is room for air to flow around it, right? Would an inch above be ok? Isn't that about what RD's placement of his heater have? Looks about right. Does RD have anything else under that step besides the heater? I'm wondering about the spacing requirements.... needs to prevent any overheating of the unit.
Because I've been tinkering with my heater, I can tell you for sure that most of the body of the heater is only warm to the touch. However, there are areas that ROASTINGLY hot. See pic below.

The area in green is only warm and you can keep your hand on it no problem. In fact, there are electronics in that area and they need to be kept cool. That's also the end where the cold air intake is and so there's cooling from the incoming air.

The areas in red are super hot and if you touch it for more than a second, you will burn your hand for sure! Note: the base mounting plate is really hot as well.

Now, is it hot enough to melt fuel tanks and char or burn wood? No. Especially if they are an inch or more away. But don't touch those red areas.

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Is that whole mounting plate 'hot'? Or just the area below it surrounding the hot air exhaust pipe? I was thinking of having the VanRug surrounding it, but below the composite flooring. I might have to rethink this again. I wonder if it would be safer to have it on the composite flooring which is on top of the VanRug? Only the ports are a little short to exit the floor of the van then.... about a 1/4 to 1/2 inch or so I think. Some have put insulation around their heater... perhaps an inch away or so? If that insulation, like my VanRug is ontop of the mounting plate, but an inch away, I wonder if that's a problem?
 

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Is that whole mounting plate 'hot'? Or just the area below it surrounding the hot air exhaust pipe? I was thinking of having it under the VanRug, but below the composite flooring. I might have to rethink this again.
The entire mounting plate is hot; the other side (not in the pic) is too, all of it. You won't be able to touch it more than just briefly.

I too was going to cover that plate with a kind of polyurethane foam flooring material, but I have ruled that out now.
 
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Ok, I haven't drilled yet... I think Doberman put his heater ontop of his 3/4" plywood flooring which is ontop of his VanRug.... If the mounting plate is ontop of the flooring, composite in my case, do you think that would be a problem? Would the comp flooring be ok or not? It is only resein/etc mixed. I could make sure to drill out extra space around the hot air exhaust.
 

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Here is my heater install write-up for anyone interested. I think I put an IR thermometer on the metal mounting plate and it was about 120 degrees when running after a few hours. The exhaust duct and exhaust was more like 150 degrees or so as I recall. That seems hot, but think about an enclosed vehicle with no window shades in the hot summer sun, easily 120 to 150 or more.

 

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Good point.... So, do you think it's safe to install ontop of the comp flooring/Vanrug? as long as it is spaced an inch or so? Otherwise, I'd have to reposition... I could just cutout that whole flooring area... I really don't need it there, as I'm going to cover it up anyway. Just thought of that.... hmm. That would solve a couple of problems.. it would give me enough room/space above the heater to put the 'toilet' bucket setup.... as long as there's an inch or two, I could put some 3/4" plywood above it to rest the bucket etc on... no? That would give it a roughly 20" x 20" space... around it... and a couple inches above it.

If it's only 120 to 150 degrees like a car/truck in the hot sun... then that seems doable....
 

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I forgot to mention that my base plate is on top of my 3/8 plywood floor, in direct contact. I didn't get a sense the plate was too hot to be touching plywood.
 

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Mine is on top of sheet vinyl which is glued to 3/4 inch plywood. I don't feel like a hundred and twenty degrees is going to be a problem. Summertime with some sun can get that hot anyway.
 

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Thanks for your link and video.... explained the wire issue... wondered what that extra hole was for in line with the two main ones in the middle. So, if you aren't directly placing the heater on the metal floor, you need to widen the hole to compensate for the flooring/insulation so it doesn't touch, burn, overheat etc? At least on the exhaust tube area?
 

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Larger hole... That's what I did. I cut 2 - 3" holes offset in my flooring, then used a jigsaw to make an oval cutout. That gave about 1" clearance around the exhaust to anything nearby.
 

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Your heater has plenty of space around it to dissipate the heat... I was wondering if I could limit that space more in my build..
 

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That's what I'm planning to do.... and set my 'toilet' bucket setup on top of a sheet of plywood above the heater. I could leave the heater space more open to vent around it, next to the slider door across to the main living area in the middle of the van. That should be enough, no? If I leave it more open, it would allow better venting of the airflow around it.
 
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