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A chainsaw fuel filter will work fine and they are cheap. Make sure that both the air intake and the exhaust output have minimal restrictions and bends.
 

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Barking Heater Arrived;

Got home & there was a box at the front door - the barking heater arrived 馃榿

So that was quick as I ordered it 6 days ago.

Not sure f there is a plastic protector film over the controller screen (I pulled a strip off - but it is weird). Anyone else experienced a plastic cover over the thermostat controller?


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Thanks Gang for all of your comments & info

I got the 鈥渂arking鈥 heater installed & running today. I have tested it a bit & like it, but will get some time in before I report the good & bad about it.

A filter did come with the kit. The pump had an arrow on it (I assumed a flow arrow indicator), but the Chinese to English instructions that are very lacking, showed the install in reverse. I followed the instructions & should have followed my instinct, cause when I went to prime the diesel lines the pump was pumping the factory residue back towards the tank 馃槼

So I rectified that, primed the lines, & it fired up. Now I have to study the manual so I can figure out how the controller works. I think I can set it to shut off temperature.

It seems to use a fair bit of 12v battery to run it compared to my Propex, but I am not really setup to be able to monitor that yet.

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Only on start up does it use a lot of power otherwise it just hums along relatively efficiently.
 
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@RV8R, translated Chinese instructions are just good for a laugh. The FB group and YouTube are better, but they still require some interpreting for your specific heater. Look through the "Files" on the FB group for help with your LCD controller. The various colour LCD controllers have more in common than not.
 

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Is it alright to place the heater next to the diesel tank? I'm thinking of placing it under the 'toilet' or bucket... will need to shorten the bucket/urine diverter some to fit it on top of the heater/tank. Does the heater need for breathing room? Does it get too warm to stay next to the tank and/or under the bucket of poo when not disposed of in a timely manner? Mainly, is it safe to place the heater this way?
 

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Is it alright to place the heater next to the diesel tank? I'm thinking of placing it under the 'toilet' or bucket... will need to shorten the bucket/urine diverter some to fit it on top of the heater/tank. Does the heater need for breathing room? Does it get too warm to stay next to the tank and/or under the bucket of poo when not disposed of in a timely manner? Mainly, is it safe to place the heater this way?
I just installed mine and I didn't recall the outer body getting particularly hot. I had my face right up to it sniffing for fumes. Certainly nowhere even close to being able to ignite diesel fuel.

On the other hand, I'm not sure warming up poo is a great idea, even if it's a little bit! o_O:p I'll leave that up to your own senses!

You should do a bench test of the heater anyways to make sure it's working well before going through the effort to install it. You can then see for yourself about the heat. It's good practice anyway. The heater may be working fine but one's installation methodology may be off and it's good to know before you're crawling around under the van.
 

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Is it alright to place the heater next to the diesel tank? I'm thinking of placing it under the 'toilet' or bucket... will need to shorten the bucket/urine diverter some to fit it on top of the heater/tank. Does the heater need for breathing room? Does it get too warm to stay next to the tank and/or under the bucket of poo when not disposed of in a timely manner? Mainly, is it safe to place the heater this way?
What I found out is the metal floor mounting plate gets quite hot (too hot to touch).

@phil is right, the diesel intake tube is about 1鈥 away from the exhaust tube.

Im pretty happy with my Chinese Barking Heater so far in my 300sf cabin @ 3500鈥 ASL

KOV is right about the 12v consumption - the startup process takes heavier amperage to get the glow plug going & after that the 12v required is really just for the air blowing fan.
 

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I've just installed my diesel heater. A few operational observations:

1) our PM's are like a sieve. If you are running a ventilation fan that normally pulls air out of the PM and your heater's exhaust is anywhere near the floor (and why wouldn't it be?) the exhaust fumes will get sucked into the PM. This is even when I have the vent fan at low (10% or 20%) and the passenger window open 3 inches.

2) The heater's fumes are quite clean (hardly any smell) when its combustion chamber has reached normal operating temperature. But at startup time, the fumes are very smelly; I'm guessing due to incomplete combustion. Note: the exhaust fumes during shutdown are ALSO smelly.

3) Depending on the kit you get, the connection of the fuel lines at both ends of the pump, the fuel filter, and perhaps at the heater are not perfect. There is no visible fuel leakage, not even a hint of it (connections are dry), BUT there must be a few molecules that manage to get by the rubber hose and clamp such that I can smell it. I verified this with a "sniff test", my nose less than 1 inch from each connection. --refer to my point #1, fuel smells WILL get into the van if you have run a vent fan that draws air out.

Solutions:

1 and 2) Exhaust fumes. I've made a procedural change to venting the van. Normally the fan vents air out. But immediately before startup up OR shutting down the heater, I reverse the vent fan so that it draws air IN, creating positive pressure. No fumes are now drawn in from the underside of the van. After a few minutes--I recommend 10 minutes--I can return the vent fan to drawing air out again because the fumes from the heater are pretty clean at normal operating temperature or, if the heater has been shut down, the smelly "shutdown" fumes have dissipated.

Note, this procedure is not 100% perfect. There could be times (wind conditions) such that the smelly fumes will reach the top of the van's roof (where my fan is) and get drawn into the van that way, but that's a much lower percent chance and the fumes are more dilute at that point.

3) Diesel fuel fumes. Tightening the (el cheapo) hose clamps at the connection points didn't solve the smell issue. I've resorted to silicone caulk. A big blob at each fuel line connection. This has solved the problem for now. Time will tell if the diesel fuel will dissolve the silicone blob and the smell returns.

It's taken a couple of days of tinkering to solve these smell issues. I am very sensitive to smells, especially fuel smells (I get nauseated). And so if these issues didn't get solved, I would have scrapped the entire diesel heater experiment.

Edited: typo
 
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@travelvanvan
How did you terminate your exhaust pipe?
I did mine like so, no issues.
My exhaust is coming out just in front of the rear wheel. I can tell the fumes are coming in via the "bilge area" where the plastic triangles are at the edge of the floor by the slider door. If I remove one of the triangles and sniff down there, the smell is definitely strong (when the exhaust fan is drawing air out of the van, creating negative pressure).

Maybe this area is particularly "leaky".

Please ignore the coat-hanger install. I'm still wrestling with where I want to route the exhaust and so I didn't want to make anything permanent yet.

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3) Diesel fuel fumes. Tightening the (el cheapo) hose clamps at the connection points didn't solve the smell issue. I've resorted to silicone caulk. A big blob at each fuel line connection. This has solved the problem for now. Time will tell if the diesel fuel will dissolve the silicone blob and the smell returns.

It's taken a couple of days of tinkering to solve these smell issues. I am very sensitive to smells, especially fuel smells (I get nauseated). And so if these issues didn't get solved, I would have scrapped the entire diesel heater experiment.

Edited: typo
Since I was down on the ground taking pics, I sniffed my silicone-caulked joints. ...and...it failed to be a permanent solution. The smell is fainter but I can still detect it.

Further, the caulk is turning brown, the same colour as the kerosene I'm currently using as the fuel. And the caulk is gummier than I expect it to be. So I'm thinking the fuel is slowly diffusing through the silicone and making it out into the atmosphere and from there potentially into the cabin. At the moment, I can't quite tell there's a diesel smell in the cabin, but I think I detect something.

Like I said, fuel smells bother me and I've got a sensitive nose. I could have been a wine-taster.

Now I've got to figure out another solution...

Edit: silicone not kerosene
 

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@travelvanvan, a few suggestions:

Orient the muffler like @phil did, i.e., point the drain hole down. It wouldn't rust out as fast.

I immediately replaced all the fuel lines and clamps copying Espar methods. I bought Espar rigid fuel line (local truck parts supply) and spliced in rubber fuel hose for the connections. I also used fuel injector-style hose clamps. My aux fuel tank and pump are both under the hood. The fuel line runs under the van to the heater mounted on/thru the floor so no fuel lines are inside. I've never-ever smelled raw fuel (kerosene), except maybe right over the tank.

The exhaust does smell on start-up and shut-down. We close all the vents and windows for that. If we open any while it's running, we do it on the opposite side from the exhaust. We find the exhaust smell is totally manageable.

But speaking of smells, we also replaced the black hot-air duct that came with the unit. That stuff smelled REALLY bad when hot. I found some aluminum ducting the same diameter.
 

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I have this style of fuel line, flexible and seals well.
View attachment 65892
My kit actually came with your type of hose, but a video by John (I forget his last name) showed that the hard nylon line was better and so I "upgraded" to a kit marketed as an Espar/Wesbasto replacement fuel line kit. It had the hard nylon line as well as the pieces of flexible hose needed to connect and clamps too. Looked reasonable. Cheap too.


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But I'm annoyed that this kit doesn't seal perfectly. Maybe I did something wrong like over-tightening the clamps. Maybe the clamps are no good (they aren't really worm gear type). I don't know. I'm now going to have to try something else, including perhaps trying the flexible hose. Or maybe use epoxy to glue the nylon line to the rubber connectors. Maybe Permatex black gasket compound. :(
 

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@travelvanvan, a few suggestions:

Orient the muffler like @phil did, i.e., point the drain hole down. It wouldn't rust out as fast.

I immediately replaced all the fuel lines and clamps copying Espar methods. I bought Espar rigid fuel line (local truck parts supply) and spliced in rubber fuel hose for the connections. I also used fuel injector-style hose clamps. My aux fuel tank and pump are both under the hood. The fuel line runs under the van to the heater mounted on/thru the floor so no fuel lines are inside. I've never-ever smelled raw fuel (kerosene), except maybe right over the tank.

The exhaust does smell on start-up and shut-down. We close all the vents and windows for that. If we open any while it's running, we do it on the opposite side from the exhaust. We find the exhaust smell is totally manageable.

But speaking of smells, we also replaced the black hot-air duct that came with the unit. That stuff smelled REALLY bad when hot. I found some aluminum ducting the same diameter.
Re: muffler orientation. Agreed. It was a test configuration, though I like that it's more "aerodynamic" this way. :p

Re: fuel lines, as I mentioned to Phil, I did use a replacement fuel line kit for Espar and Wesbasto heaters (though it was likely a clone kit...) That's the kit that is every so slightly leaking.
Maybe it's the clamps that are giving me the problem. Like I said above, maybe I over-tightened them.

Could you send me a link to your fuel injector clamps? Is it those springy ones? Which truck parts supplier are you using? I'm in BC too and perhaps there's one in my area.

For noise reasons, I would have liked to have installed the pump at the front by the tank (I installed the tank in the same place you did as per your build thread) but I noted that the recommended distance from the pump to the heater would have been exceeded because my heater is near the rear wheel. So the pump is right under the dreaded bilge area; the area I described as "leaky". Any fuel fumes will get drawn in.

With my vent fan reversal procedure, the exhaust smell is now under control at least.

Luckily, I don't have any issue with the black flexible air duct. Though I haven't run it for too long; longest test was about 40 minutes.
 

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How much space around heater is recommended for ventilation or to prevent overheating issues? I was going to place it under a shelf and place the bucket/toilet on top... still thinking of this, but now the overheating concerns have been raised. Is everyone recommending any specific spacing around the heaters?

Other question is on the wire connector to the fuel pump... seems a rather large hole is needed to route it underneath, no? Or others cutting it first or just drilling out a hole big enough to push it thru the floor to the pump underneath?
Another question is on the muffler on the exhaust pipe... I see nothing in the instructions on most any of this stuff, and can't remember from the vids on YT that show it... I saw one member here ran his muffler at the end of the exhaust pipe, but then seems to have ran another piece after that to a tailpipe.... I'll have to look and see if I can find anyone mentioning this.
 

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I looked at the Espar and Webasto install manuals, can't go wrong if you use them for reference.
 

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My kit actually came with your type of hose, but a video by John (I forget his last name) showed that the hard nylon line was better and so I "upgraded" to a kit marketed as an Espar/Wesbasto replacement fuel line kit. It had the hard nylon line as well as the pieces of flexible hose needed to connect and clamps too. Looked reasonable. Cheap too.

But I'm annoyed that this kit doesn't seal perfectly. Maybe I did something wrong like over-tightening the clamps. Maybe the clamps are no good (they aren't really worm gear type). I don't know. I'm now going to have to try something else, including perhaps trying the flexible hose. Or maybe use epoxy to glue the nylon line to the rubber connectors. Maybe Permatex black gasket compound. :(
Warning, just an observation,
I looked at the video, most installs I've seen in vans have the heater located on or near floor level and the fuel tank level to or higher than the heater. So from what I've seen there is no reason to use a small bore hard fuel line, (as he said), also the flexible hose would seal better.
Also I have not observed any issues with air bubbles and the rubber pulsing, I think he's over thinking it.

Again just an observation.
:)
 
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