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I believe the complaints you read referred to the earlier version of the Wallas unit designed for marine use and not RV use.

I've had 2 of the diesel cooktops in the past 16 years. The first one was this early unit. The second one was made after Wallas joined forces with Webasto and the unit was redesigned for the RV market.

In the early version there was no altitude compensation because it was intended to operate at sea level and it would run rich at higher elevations. In the 3 years I owned it I had it serviced twice for cleaning. The weakest point was the blower which was underpowered and caused the cooktop to be slow to warm up and cool down. I had to have the fan replaced once.

The newer redesigned (by Webasto probably) unit that I've used for 13 years has altitude compensation and has never required service. The blower for combustion air is more rugged and powerful and the warmup and cool down is much faster. Making a quart of coffee in a stovetop percolator takes less than 5 minutes to perk and then a few minutes more depending on how strong you like your coffee.

The big difference compared to a propane cooktop is that the Wallas / Webasto unit draws combustion air from outside the van so there's no worry of depleting the Oxygen if you use the heater lid and it exhausts the combustion gases outside the van as well so there is no carbon monoxide released inside and no moisture to condense inside the van.

Hope you don't mind if I try to update some of that 'old' information that still persists.
tgregg

Thank you for your post, I really appreciate you taking the time to detail your experiences. I know you have lots of experience with this & I agree with everything you stated. Further is seems like they have fixed the finickiness of the diesel burning units. If I had a diesel PM I probably would have taken the chance, but my PM is gas. I only purchased the Wallas duo to use as a heater.

FYI; The Wallas Duo; after I purchased it and was reading the instructions; Detailed that the unit could take 11 minutes to start up. That was a start to me deciding to return the unit to the store. I like info like that upfront (my bad for not downloading a manual prior to buying). There were other "finicky" items detailed in the manual & I thought to myself this just isn't for me. I am sure it is a fine product - just not for me
59253





To understand my choice of going to Propane, I will explain our use of the Van;
1) We cook with Propane so we carry it regardless
2) We only cook outside - Not in the Van
3) The only onboard propane appliance we have is a Propex heater - Oxygen Intake and exhaust combustion gasses are thru the floor of the van and to the atmosphere (no fear of the Oxygen /carbon monoxide from this system or from cooking inside)
4) If for some reason we wanted to cook inside, then we would use out "induction 300W to 1800W electric cook top" This will probably be unlikely, but there if we wanted it
 

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Thanks HikerBob

I know years ago it use to be a thing. As this thread is on “Road Propane” & these threads seem to wander, I was thinking outside the box as it seems almost everyone here has two or more “road energy” source. I have for example gasoline for the engine & propane for cooking outdoors & van heat

I was just curious if anyone has done a propane conversion or considered it or even looked into it?
My dad converted the family sedan, an 80's Caprice classic to propane. We had a large tank at home that we also used for on demand hot water. Now sure about the economics of it refueling from home but I remember any longer road trip was an adventure as not all propane dealers were licensed for automotive use. This was the early 90's so no internet.
 

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Is the red circle on right a coal energy plant?

the level of water behind dam is quite a bit down...must of been 2015 when I visited mesa verda headed to st. George.....was doing big circle

Sent from my LG-H871 using Tapatalk
 

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Is the red circle on right a coal energy plant?

the level of water behind dam is quite a bit down...must of been 2015 when I visited mesa verda headed to st. George.....was doing big circle

Sent from my LG-H871 using Tapatalk
Yes Baitbegger as far as I know that is a coal fired electrical plant that dwarfs the dam in size at least (not sure about electrical production). As Gary has pointed in 2018 fossil fuel generated electricity amounts for 62.5% of electricity produced in USA. In 2012 the dam tour guide told me it was 75% so that is a step in the right direction I suppose.

The irony in 2012, when I asked the tour guide about the electric car he just shook his head no and said "It does not pencil". I took that to mean someone with an electric car can feel "green", but what are they really burning in their electric car?
 

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Another off topic post, in the photo
Glen Canyon dam 1,320MW
Navajo Power Plant 2,250MW, it is currently burning the remain coal on site and will shut down this month.
 

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Having not traveled the byways and highways of the USA I was wondering how difficult it is having my 30# propane tank filled rather than an "exchange". I purchased a $70 tank and do not want to exchange for possibly a tank that may not be up to "standards". thanking you in advance!
I can't speak to areas of eastern USA, but out west many convenience stores have both the exchange and filling opportunity. Every town of any size, say 5k population & up will have a propane jobber that will fill for you or there will be one in a nearby town. IMHO, you shouldn't have any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
I can't speak to areas of eastern USA, but out west many convenience stores have both the exchange and filling opportunity. Every town of any size, say 5k population & up will have a propane jobber that will fill for you or there will be one in a nearby town. IMHO, you shouldn't have any problems.
thanks Kevinb, that is great news, thank you sir. now no worries!
 

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I can't speak to areas of eastern USA, but out west many convenience stores have both the exchange and filling opportunity. Every town of any size, say 5k population & up will have a propane jobber that will fill for you or there will be one in a nearby town. IMHO, you shouldn't have any problems.
Just took a trip from Boston to Wisconsin and every single gas station we stopped at across 4 states had this service available.
 
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