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2017 Promaster 2500 conversion
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks, I have been using shore power to charge my Bluetti AC200 and it will run all of my DC lights fridge/freezer and fan for 3-4 days depending on usage. I recently built and installed an 80/20 roof rack using parts from UNAKA Gear and 8020 from McMaster-Carr.
I ran the wires in through the backup camera housing have and plugged them in to the Bluetti via the XT60 adapter that it came with and everything appears to work as it should. My question is should I install a switch or breaker or some sort of protective device between the panels and the Bluetti AC200?
I don't leave them plugged in full time for safety reasons till I figure this out.
Thanks In advance!
 

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2017 Promaster 2500 conversion
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks RV8R, I figured as much.
So the panels are both 240 watt panels hooked in series.
  • Max Power Output(W): 240W
  • Voltage MPP Vmp(V): 23.16V
  • Current MPP Imp(A): 10.4A
  • Voltage Open Circuit Voc(V): 26.71V
  • Short Circuit Current Isc(A): 10.97A

Should the circuit breaker be rated just higher than what is specified above. I have measured 47.3V output on the panels in series configuration. This was at high noon with no shade. I'm thinking a 15 amp 60 volt breaker if that exists. I am unsure as to how to rate the breaker.
Bluettti will accept up to 700 watts and up to 145 Volts.
 

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2017 Promaster 2500 conversion
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks Proeddie, that's what I'm thinking too!
I'm hoping a van solar veteran will chime in with confirmation or a correction!
Something like this perhaps?

Rectangle Font Parallel Electronic device Screenshot
 

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159" 2500 HR Window Van
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59 Posts
I am in same position with OP and planning on wiring solar to a Bluetti AC200 Max. I disagree with the premise that a dual pole DIN mounted disconnect is needed since with the Bluetti the solar input is not hard wired but plugged in. Un- plugging the cord is a perfectly acceptable way to disconnect the input.
 

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2021, Promaster 159 HR 2500, Silver
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364 Posts
I have bluetti ac200p. 525 watts solar. I have a mini breaker to turn it off per recommendation I received on this forum.

Mine has xt90 connector for solar. I use the xt60 for the fuse panel.
 

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Van #2 2021 EXT
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4,989 Posts
Thanks Proeddie, that's what I'm thinking too!
I'm hoping a van solar veteran will chime in with confirmation or a correction!
Something like this perhaps?

View attachment 88237
Yes something like this IMO;

You are slightly over 10amps & full panel power? Then a 15amp breaker Inthink would be perfect.

You are primarily using it as a switch.

The caveat is, in electrical design you have components where you need to consider (wire size/spec & chargers, etc). Some of this “stuff” come with multi page manuals that need to be read thru for requirements.

Before these breakers in Solar, the old school solar panel “switch” was throwing a blanket over the solar panels to “turn the power off”. Or at least that is my understanding chatting with my electrician buddy.
 

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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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2017 136” HR
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2021 1500 136"WB High top
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Lola - side question: I have the same breaker, also based on The Explorist. Did you just pinch the strands in between the clamps of the breaker or did you crimp on ferrules? I kinda don’t want to buy a ferrule crimper for 4 crimps….
I did not crimp on ferrules. My memory is the wire slipped in easily and then got screwed down. I didn’t use ferrules on anything. The protective mounting case does a nice job of holding the wires from jiggling free
 

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I did not crimp one ferrules. My memory is the wire slipped in easily and then got screwed down. I didn’t use ferrules on anything. The protective mounting case does a nice job of holding the wires from jiggling free
Yeah, that’s my plan, too, though the Explorist urges the use of ferrules.
I’m not planning on a case for the breaker; just mounting the dim rail somewhere safe.
 

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On mine once the wires flattened they would easily fall out of the breaker switch. Ended up soldering the ends of the wires to give it some structure.
Ah. Mine don't seem to want to fall out. I'll have to look at them. I think the knobs the wires thread through the box does a lot to hold them in place.
Product Rectangle Automotive lighting Gadget Font
 

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Lola - side question: I have the same breaker, also based on The Explorist. Did you just pinch the strands in between the clamps of the breaker or did you crimp on ferrules? I kinda don’t want to buy a ferrule crimper for 4 crimps….
Sometime when you are up in the Bay area, just bring me a coffee and I can crimp a pin terminal on for you.
 

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Since you just soldered the ends, I'm sure you won't run into any trouble with your setup.

For others, I just wanted to share that when you fully tin a multistrand wire, the solder wicks between the strands of copper and forms a solid, but not uniform, copper and metallic solder bundle. After clamping the bundle, the solder can later creep under the compressive force, reducing the clamping force with time. With a less than ideal contact of the cable with the terminal, the resulting heating makes things continuously degrade until something fails.

If a stranded wire is not able to be secured firmly in a clamping terminal, then crimping on a ferrule is the better way to go (or switch to a terminal designed to capture stranded wire). If soldering is necessary, then best practice is to just tin the very tip of the exposed stranded wire.

On mine once the wires flattened they would easily fall out of the breaker switch. Ended up soldering the ends of the wires to give it some structure.
 

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2016 3500 ext-ht
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Ah. Mine don't seem to want to fall out. I'll have to look at them. I think the knobs the wires thread through the box does a lot to hold them in place.
View attachment 88247
They may not fall out due to the strain relief fitting but a loose connection is a loose connection where it really matters. A loose connection creates heat. More than not, the heat from a loose connection can destroy the screw down connector on the device. Ferrules save money, versus cost money. Most manufacturers can deny a warranty claim with a burnt connector. What torque value does the manual provide and/or do they suggest or require ferrules?
 

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Sometime when you are up in the Bay area, just bring me a coffee and I can crimp a pin terminal on for you.
Thanks, Harry, that’s very sweet. I might just take you up on that. I’m overdue for a visit!
Are pin terminals and ferrules the same? I’ll need it on 8AWG wire.
 
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2017 136” HR
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They may not fall out due to the strain relief fitting but a loose connection is a loose connection where it really matters. A loose connection creates heat. More than not, the heat from a loose connection can destroy the screw down connector on the device. Ferrules save money, versus cost money. Most manufacturers can deny a warranty claim with a burnt connector. What torque value does the manual provide and/or do they suggest or require ferrules?
I was afraid of that, as a matter of fact in Europe it’s code to use ferrules. Those breakers don’t come with any instructions or torque. I learned about the ferrules from The Explorist.
 

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I was afraid of that, as a matter of fact in Europe it’s code to use ferrules. Those breakers don’t come with any instructions or torque. I learned about the ferrules from The Explorist.
Try Midnite Solar website for well made double pole breakers. Vetted and well made. Residential/commercial suppliers won't monkey around with cheap stuff because their installer network would be up in arms if their products don't pass code inspection. Any connector worth it's salt will have a torque value in the data sheet or on the breaker label itself.

I use this tool for fixing connectors:


Always double check the torque after the system has been working for a few days as well as every couple of months as part of electrical maintenance.
 
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