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MrNomer tried with considerable vigor to make that fit, but he didn't heat it up because he was concerned it might split.
Well, I can attest to it not splitting when heated and forced with vigour, but didn't get it forced on as far as RobLee did. Hopefully good enough though.

(As a side note, heating with a heat gun rather than boiling water is a good way to get smoke and a large blister on my thumb - boiling water worked much better)

RobLee, it looks like you also used the Dorman 800-081 or 800-123 connector - I'm impressed that you got the 5mm I.D. hose forced onto the 8mm (5/16") barb...
 

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Wow. The combustion is technically outside as the device takes in outside air and exhausts outside and the combustion is inside a sealed compartment. I take it the heater CAN be installed in the sleeping space of a truck cab, but not the driver portion? Odd

I just rush returned from AZ alone with our Jack Russell in my van. Until this trip we used the diesel Espar evenings and mornings and not overnight. Having the big puppy changed the situation as I was warm enough on our IKEA foam mattress under the “Bear” our Kelty sleeping bag unzipped on top. Jack however woke me up the first night when the temperatures went to mid thirties whimpering cold. I got him from his carrier and he was shivering and felt cold. I got him under the covers with me like a hypothermia patient. He loved it of course. I ran the heater all the trip nights and had to do an attitude adjustment with him about his desire to sleep with me. If you have a fur traveler a heater might be a necessity not an option.
 

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Well, I can attest to it not splitting when heated and forced

RobLee, it looks like you also used the Dorman 800-081 or 800-123 connector - I'm impressed that you got the 5mm I.D. hose forced onto the 8mm (5/16") barb...
I heated the hose a few times and held it with padded pliers to twist and push it onto the barb. Added the clamp for good measure especially because the barb is tapered. The hose didn't go all the way to the maximum diameter of the barb. The pressure and volume of fuel is very small. I just looked at it after about 5,000 miles and it's still firm. If that joint fails the furnace won't run but I see no reason that would cause damage. At least access for checking or fixing is easy.
 

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So I bought my Webasto gas heater and have been sitting on it for the last three months, just not having the time to push things further on my van. I'm finally getting around to some van improvements, and I had some questions.

One question I have a feeling I asked before and that RD answered for me but I can't find it, so I apologize in advance. I'm planning to install it directly behind the driver's seat, with its long axis perpendicular to the van's long axis. How much room will it need? It's going to be between the kitchenette (not yet installed either) and the driver's seat, so I'm trying to figure out where to put the kitchenette.

A second question is whether I need to install the heater before installing the kitchenette. It would be easier for various reasons to do the kitchenette first, but if that's going to make the heater install a bear, I can do it another way.

Third question: I have two choices about how to get the installation done. One is that I have someone local who I have a fair amount of confidence in but who isn't an expert in this. He does construction and he works on cars. He's done work for me in other contexts, and he's smart and diligent -- but he's never done this particular task before. He charges $25/hr, which is incredibly cheap for his skill level. (I typically pay him a bit more, actually.)

The other option is to take it up to Denver to Rush Truck Center, which has done a couple of installs for other folks around here. They've charged other people $300 to do it. They ordinarily work on big rigs, not vans, but they have the expertise. But I'm in Santa Fe, not Denver, and although I go up there frequently, I won't be going ordinarily for another couple of months. That's not a big deal if I can do the kitchenette first, but if I can't, it's kind of a drag.

Any thoughts on that?

Fourth question: My van has foam insulation on the floor with a sheet metal subfloor and marmoleum. My vague understanding is that the subfloor will need to be removed for the heater -- is that correct? If so, how difficult a job is that? What are the best tools to use? I don't have much experience dealing with metal.

TIA, all!
 

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Discussion Starter #126
Given that you must provide access to the heater anyway for future maintenance, I don't see a problem doing the kitchen first. Then you can have Rush do the install. Your biggest headache is going to be registering above floor with below floor, so you probably want to nail the exact position for the heater first, then do the kitchen.

Yes, you must go all the way to the bottom of your floor sandwich. A multitool can do it all with the right blades.

Be sure to do the high-altitude adjustment right up front.

You're gonna love it.
 

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Discussion Starter #129 (Edited)
On my build site referenced below, in "The Webasto Install: Part Two", there is a photo looking down at the enclosure. Interior dimensions are 9" x 13", including a bit of extra space on each end because that's what fit my cabinetry. The 9" is about as narrow as you'll get away with and still have room to remove the cover. It's about 5" tall, could maybe be a little less.

The hole in the floor, IIRC, is 7" x 7", dictated by the plate.

I don't remember whether you are gas or diesel. If gas, be sure to check out the sweet spot for the fuel pump.
 

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Thanks so much for this. The cost of the Webasto and install is proving to be a little prohibitive for me right now, but I want to save space for it to be added later and this info will be so valuable.
On my build site referenced below, in "The Webasto Install: Part Two", there is a photo looking down at the enclosure. Interior dimensions are 9" x 13", including a bit of extra space on each end because that's what fit my cabinetry. The 9" is about as narrow as you'll get away with and still have room to remove the cover. It's about 5" tall, could maybe be a little less.

The hole in the floor, IIRC, is 7" x 7", dictated by the plate.

I don't remember whether you are gas or diesel. If gas, be sure to check out the sweet spot for the fuel pump.
 

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Thanks Julie,
Jack the Jack Russell, like all his breed, have a mind of their own and we have tried “blanket” like bedding for him in his crate. He will shred it, rip it up, push it into a corner, and chew holes in it but will not under any circumstances we can find, sleep under it. LOL. These are supposed to be smart dogs but he doesn’t get it with blanket-like things. Using the heater overnight more has been a revelation for me. I now plan to just do that as it is so quiet and nice. I thought it would keep waking me up like my old propane “furnace” did but it doesn’t.
My installed cost for the Espar diesel heater was $887, about the same as the optional radio w/navigation. I am happy to have spent the money on the heater instead.
 

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We've run into a snag with our Webasto install that I'm hoping you all can help us with.

Sorry the pic is upside down -- I have no idea how that happened, and I can't figure out how to delete it to try again. The piece on the left is the factory supplied ‘nipple’ for running an auxiliary gas line into the gas tank for the heater. The hose on the right is the gasoline to the heater. The problem is we can’t find an elbow to connect the two. We need one that is copper, that won’t let either piece leak, and that will fit in the about 1/2 inch clearance when the lid is closed.

What have other people using this solution done? We haven’t been able to find the part in any plumbing, hardware, or auto parts store. Our Promaster is a 2017, and the auto parts stores have said the problem is that it's so new.
 

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My Espar came with a long brass tube to install in normal fuel tanks that had a curved elbow on one end. I cut it off and used it with two short pieces of fuel line tube from the parts counter at an auto parts store and 4 small clamps that tighten up with a screwdriver. If you didn't get that tube make one from soft copper tube of the correct size. Just appear helpless at the counter and explain what you need on each end and let them invent the solution. The young woman who helped me took me back to the spools of fuel line and let me take short samples of a couple, no charge.
Open the picture in any picture editing program, get it upright or if it is just save it and it will post up correctly.
 

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We've run into a snag with our Webasto install that I'm hoping you all can help us with.

Sorry the pic is upside down -- I have no idea how that happened, and I can't figure out how to delete it to try again. The piece on the left is the factory supplied ‘nipple’ for running an auxiliary gas line into the gas tank for the heater. The hose on the right is the gasoline to the heater. The problem is we can’t find an elbow to connect the two. We need one that is copper, that won’t let either piece leak, and that will fit in the about 1/2 inch clearance when the lid is closed.

What have other people using this solution done? We haven’t been able to find the part in any plumbing, hardware, or auto parts store. Our Promaster is a 2017, and the auto parts stores have said the problem is that it's so new.
MsNomer has already commented about the solution MrNomer used. RobLee and I used a variant of that, just using the Dorman connector and provided components from Webasto. See this post and others around it. If you’d still like more details, I can take a photo or two.
 
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