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Discussion Starter #1
Fellow motorcyclists,
I just bought a 159-in high roof ProMaster. My first priority is getting a good ramp that will allow me to get both of my cruisers loaded into the van safely and quickly with a minimum of fuss.

It seems the two main options are getting a ramp that I store inside the van and then pull out to load and unload the motorcycles, like something I would get from harbor freight tools. Or getting one of those ramps that is actually affixed to the back of the van that then folds up and essentially blocks the rear of the van when it is up.

I'm sure there are pros and cons to both. The ramps that stay attached to the van appear like they would be the most easy to use. But they just seem bulky and I just don't like the looks of them. They just don't seem to be an elegant solution.

On the other hand a simple ramp from harbor freight tools would be cheaper and I could just store it inside the van but it seems like that would take more time and effort and possibly be not as safe.

What solutions have you guys found. This ramp would have to hold my cruiser which weighs about 700 lb not including me.

When I was browsing I came across a company that makes a ProMaster van where they replaced the rear doors with an entire wrap that then folds up and becomes the rear door but I can't for the life of me find that link again. but I think they only sold complete advance and not the door itself. But I could be wrong. That seems like it would be the best solution.
 

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Fellow motorcyclists,
I just bought a 159-in high roof ProMaster. My first priority is getting a good ramp that will allow me to get both of my cruisers loaded into the van safely and quickly with a minimum of fuss.

It seems the two main options are getting a ramp that I store inside the van and then pull out to load and unload the motorcycles, like something I would get from harbor freight tools. Or getting one of those ramps that is actually affixed to the back of the van that then folds up and essentially blocks the rear of the van when it is up.

I'm sure there are pros and cons to both. The ramps that stay attached to the van appear like they would be the most easy to use. But they just seem bulky and I just don't like the looks of them. They just don't seem to be an elegant solution.

On the other hand a simple ramp from harbor freight tools would be cheaper and I could just store it inside the van but it seems like that would take more time and effort and possibly be not as safe.

What solutions have you guys found. This ramp would have to hold my cruiser which weighs about 700 lb not including me.

When I was browsing I came across a company that makes a ProMaster van where they replaced the rear doors with an entire wrap that then folds up and becomes the rear door but I can't for the life of me find that link again. but I think they only sold complete advance and not the door itself. But I could be wrong. That seems like it would be the best solution.
I would think an aluminum trifold that can take 1500lbs & then fold up & put inside would be inexpensive, safe to load as it would allow both feet on the ramp to ride/walk the bike up, & hide the ramp inside when you are done.

If you are building out your van for camping in, then a tow behind trailer Might be the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would think an aluminum trifold that can take 1500lbs & then fold up & put inside would be inexpensive, safe to load as it would allow both feet on the ramp to ride/walk the bike up, & hide the ramp inside when you are done.

If you are building out your van for camping in, then a tow behind trailer Might be the way to go.
Thank you. For now we won't be doing much camping in it. The main prority for us is to be able to load our bikes to go to motorcycling events / rallies etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you plan on pushing a 700# bike up a ramp ?
Honestly I haven't given it much thought. but now that you mention it that does sound pretty difficult doesn't it? I'm nearly as new to motorcycling as I am to owning this van. I would prefer to just be able to slowly ride it right up the ramp into the van.
 

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In my young man days it took some effort to run a 350# dirt bike up a 7 foot ramp . We had some disscusion on this forum regarding winches , even a crane idea . I would like to get another bike but . . .
 

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Build it out of 3/4 plywood. Wide enough so you can walk it up while idling it. Be creative and paint a highway on it or something. Store it sideways along the side. Cheap and you do not worry about someone stealing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Build it out of 3/4 plywood. Wide enough so you can walk it up while idling it. Be creative and paint a highway on it or something. Store it sideways along the side. Cheap and you do not worry about someone stealing it.
That's a super creative idea! I like it!
 

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If you have Cruisers, you will almost certainly need a ramp that has an arch so that you don't drag when transitioning from ramp to van floor. Walking a 700 pound bike up the ramp is near impossible, but walking next to it while you feather the clutch is quite doable. When unloading, keep the bike turned off but in gear, and you can feather the clutch like a rear brake. The thin front tire of a cruiser will have little to no stopping power when backing down a ramp.

Also look for places to load/unload where you can either have the front wheels going up a little incline or the rear wheels in a little dip in the road, to lower the back end and minimize the transition.

SRTOffroad.com has some of the strongest ramps I've ever used for their price point.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you have Cruisers, you will almost certainly need a ramp that has an arch so that you don't drag when transitioning from ramp to van floor. Walking a 700 pound bike up the ramp is near impossible, but walking next to it while you feather the clutch is quite doable. When unloading, keep the bike turned off but in gear, and you can feather the clutch like a rear brake. The thin front tire of a cruiser will have little to no stopping power when backing down a ramp.

Also look for places to load/unload where you can either have the front wheels going up a little incline or the rear wheels in a little dip in the road, to lower the back end and minimize the transition.

SRTOffroad.com has some of the strongest ramps I've ever used for their price point.
Thank you. I'm new to this and you've given me very useful information.
I just ordered this fold up ramp from harbor freight:


According to this ramp length calculator I should be "ok" based on the wheelbase and clearance of my bikes. I'm sure longer is better, but It seemed a good value for the cost.

How To Determine Proper Motorcycle Loading Ramp Length| discountramps.com

I also ordered two of these wheel chock systems:


thanks again for your help. Any other suggestions I'm all ears!
 

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I’ve had two (now one left) of a similar wheel chock from Harbor Freight that work great and could save you $350 for two.
For a m/c ramp get this and the bike goes up one and you go up the other. I grew up in a family m/c dealership, I used to just ride the customer’s bikes up the ramp.
 

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I just ordered this fold up ramp from harbor freight:
Just make sure to have someone off to the side watching when you go up it the first time to make sure you don't drag the bottom or get hung up. Most cruisers don't do well with a straight ramp.
 

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A removeable ramp is the cheapest option. I must say i do like the set up from Carolina Utility mentioned above. There are several options in the link I am posting below. You also might want to measure your ground to cargo floor height as this varies on Promasters. I removed one of the leaf springs and added a set of sumo super springs to lower the back of my van some. Both of my bikes are drag bikes and ground clearance is a premium.
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Discussion Starter #20
One more.
thank you! You have a super clean setup that I would like to replicate. I ordered the cheapo harbor freight ramp but after two weeks they still haven't even shipped it so I think I'm going to cancel.

So I have more questions!

1. what flooring material is that? It looks like you have your tie downs recessed through cutouts in the flooring?
2. what kind of ratchet straps do you have? I hate the normal ones - mostly because I'm an idiot and can never figure them out, or they end up tangling or just being a pain in the ass.
3. what kind of wheel chock is that?

Any other motorcycle hauling suggestions?

thank you!
 
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