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Hovenweep. If you have time check out the units in colorado. There's plenty of dry camping near them. Also out of Moab there's plenty of BLM campsites just outside of canyonlands in the sky island district. Again dry camping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Hello All;

Thank You Very Much for all your suggestions & comments.

Although 4 corners might be geographically cool , I think we are scrapping that stop of interest. We will look at all of your recommendations on the map & start to figure it out.

Much Appreciated !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
From visit to Dead Horse State Park

Vertigo Leap
View attachment 90110 View attachment 90110
Thanks @baitbegger44## I have seen that artwork of yours before & never made the connection to “Dead Horse”.

We have only been there once & rode our Harleys thru that area when on a bike trip many years ago (stayed in a tent near Moab). I recall it was “hot” in the tent.

Much of our trips (motorbikes or van), depends upon weather. We adjust based upon the environmental conditions. Thus our only time @ the Moab area was short lived as temps were @ or north of 40C.
 

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When you get to CA, you should go straight to the San Diego/Mexico border (after seeing all the other stuff people have posted so far) and follow the coast all the way north to San Francisco. The coastline magnificent.

Most things in the middle of the state are blah blah blah. No need to waste time on desert and smelly farm land. From San Francisco, head east to Yosemite, and then north to Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada mountains.

PS: prepare to get kicked in the nuts at the first gas station you stop at in CA, and all other gas stations here as well. It'll be like entering a nut kicking contest against someone with 20 legs.
 

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If you take the road from Monument Valley (Highway 163) to the turnoff for Cedar Mesa (Moki Dugway Highway 261), there is a spot along Highway 163 where I saw lots of cars pulled off the highway and several people standing in the middle of the highway with tripods taking photos of the scenery with their companions posing in the road. It turns out this spot was featured in the movie Forrest Gump. This is where Forrest decided to stop running after having run across the country and back. Here is a clip of the scene from the movie with Forrest and his followers close behind.



Sky Cloud Ecoregion Infrastructure Travel


There are lots of boondocking possibilities in the area but not in the Monument Valley Tribal area, which has an admission fee in addition to camping fees. About 40 miles south along Highways 163 and 160 and then 10 miles up Paved Highway 564 to the end is Navajo National Monument with a free National Park type campground. Some hiking in the monument with views of ancient cliff dwellings.

If you go North out of Monument Valley and up the Moki Dugway (Dirt Road with several switchbacks), you will start the climb up to Cedar Mesa At the bottom of the Moki Dugway is the turnoff for Valley of the Gods. Unpaved loop road, through red rock canyons similar to Monument Valley, but free and less crowded, with boondock camping sites. A bit farther up the Moki Dugway is the Goosenecks Overlook and State Park. Fees for camping. At the top of Moki Dugway the pavement returns and you have reached Cedar Mesa. Boondocking possibilities on side roads, but some of them can be a bit rough. Cedar Mesa is part of Bears Ears National Monument. As you head north across the mesa, stop at Grand Gulch Ranger Station for Hiking info. Some of the hikes to protected cliff dwellings require permits and can be obtained here. At the North End of the Mesa is the turnoff for Natural Bridges National Monument. There are some side roads just before the entrance with several boondocking spots. Natural Bridges has a fee campground which tends to fill up frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
When you get to CA, you should go straight to the San Diego/Mexico border (after seeing all the other stuff people have posted so far) and follow the coast all the way north to San Francisco. The coastline magnificent.

Most things in the middle of the state are blah blah blah. No need to waste time on desert and smelly farm land. From San Francisco, head east to Yosemite, and then north to Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada mountains.

PS: prepare to get kicked in the nuts at the first gas station you stop at in CA, and all other gas stations here as well. It'll be like entering a nut kicking contest against someone with 20 legs.
Thanks @Van vs Wild

Decorative nutcracker Nutcracker Costume hat Toy Fictional character



In Vancouver BC, I have seen $2.42 / liter of regular lately. That is $ 9.16 CAN for a US gal. Exchange rate is 138%

That is You will pay $ 6.64 USD for a US gal of regular in Vancouver BC.

Thanks for the suggestions 😁👍
 

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Thanks @Van vs Wild

View attachment 90139


In Vancouver BC, I have seen $2.42 / liter of regular lately. That is $ 9.16 CAN for a US gal. Exchange rate is 138%

That is You will pay $ 6.64 USD for a US gal of regular in Vancouver BC.

Thanks for the suggestions 😁👍
Oh I wasn’t aware you guys in the Great White North were already accustomed to the nutcracker anthem at your local gas stations 😆

I sincerely apologize for my lack of international nutcracker economics. I guess we can cry together now that CA the country and CA the state have matching gas prices. 😭😭😭

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Ed
 

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Like others have said, plenty of BLM camping areas near Moab (one of them off 313 on the way to Canyonlands Island in the Sky was great).

If you are going farther west or don't mind a detour, spend a full day at Capitol Reef NP and stop at Goblin Valley State Park on the way, it's worth spending half a day wandering through the small hoodoos at Goblin.

I wouldn't bother with the fee area of Monument Valley, there are plenty of areas around there (others have mentioned) that are just as spectacular and won't be as crowded.
 

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I just finished a 3800-mile two-week tour of Dinosaur, Rocky Mountain NP, Badlands NP, Devils Tower, Beartooth for an average of $4/gal (and 17.4 mpg!) Prices definitely rise closer to the Left Coast. But not that much.

$4/gal is pretty much the same price it was 30 years ago: Gasoline Prices Adjusted for Inflation | US Inflation Calculator

Speaking of Capital Reef: the Burr Trail switchbacks are also pretty awesome. Plenty of dry camping just outside the park on the west side.
 

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It's clear there are resellers, taxes, fees, etc but that still seems high when gasoline is trading around $2.50/gal. Got it at Costco in Spartanburg, SC the other day for $2.97/gal where it's been below $3/gal for at least a couple weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
It's clear there are resellers, taxes, fees, etc but that still seems high when gasoline is trading around $2.50/gal. Got it at Costco in Spartanburg, SC the other day for $2.97/gal where it's been below $3/gal for at least a couple weeks.
I live in British Columbia ,,, BC. Many Albertans tell me the BC really stands for “Bring Cash” 😜
 

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Natural hot springs:
Deep Creek in socal. $15 per person to camp,1.8 mile hike each way. Steep up on the way out.
San Antonio Hot Springs in Santa Fe National Forest. We took an ~11 mile hike. Might be snowy depending on time of year. My favorite hot springs. Amazing views. There are a couple other warm springs in the area as well.
Arizona hot springs. I think it was a few miles each way down through a canyon. Can be a loop. The hot springs are in the canyon with rock going straight up both sides. Colorado river just a bit past the springs.

We will be in NM and AZ through the holidays, somewhere.

We took Snoqualmie west, it didn't stand out as anything out of the ordinary. Not steep but not that great either. I only remember cuz we stopped at a brewery with a beer called "Snoqualmie Maybe" (after the song So Call Me Maybe) and another called "Jandy Rohnson" (after Randy Johnson the pitcher). We slept in the parking lot.

The southern OR and NorCal coast are really nice and tons of place to spend the night at the beach or overlooking the rocky ocean. May be getting chilly though. Point Reyes was out favorite place to hike when we lived in the bay area, but it's a bit out of the way. Cafe Aquatica at the mouth of the Russian River in Jenner is another of our favorite places to stop for some crab sandwiches and catch some live music on weekends if the weather is nice.

In Moab our favorite hike was a slot canyon east of the park called Mary Jane Canyon. Mostly flat, just really nice creek and waterfall in the canyon at the end. Arches was a zoo but a bit quieter if you do the full loop hike at the very north end.

Canyons of the Ancients outside Cortez, CO was a fun hike viewing all the cliff dwelling ruins along the way.
 

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So ,,, If our plans go well we are planning a van trip into the USA the first time since Feb 2020 (the pandemic).

Loosely thinking to cross the border near Vancouver BC & onto; Wendover UT, Moab UT & Monument Valley. Looks like this will take us over the Snoqualmie Pass, which by memory is a fairly steep climb. We could go thru Portland OR & along the Columbia River as an alternative.

After Monument Valley, we are interested in 4 Corners, then NM, AZ, NV, CA. Not sure of the route home after that. Looking for interesting outdoor locations and hikes along with decent weather.

Open to suggestions of your favorites in those areas
I hope to enjoy a similar trip after I retire in a 1.5 years, of course! I am starting across the river from Portland. I have never thought of Snoqualmie as a steep pass. How long are you planning to travel? I ordered a booklet from the state of Utah visitor’s bureau about all the places to see in Utah.
 

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Dead Horse is great spot IF you can get in (that time of year might be a bit easier). If nothing there you can park on the same large plateau on way to Deadhorse on Long Canyon Road, it's hard packed dirt and is almost like a freeway off ramp on the left from the deadhorse hwy, and as you get a ways down, there are nice views on right side and I believe you can park anywhere. Just do NOT, go down the hill to get to the Colorado River (Pucker Pass), as it descends, it gets quite rough, sandy and steep (prior to that far east end of the road though, it's smooth and level). Also consider cliff dwelling west of Bluff UT where you can do many short hikes in a line and see dwellings. Or, Mesa Verde is a couple of hours away, just view their website and see whether some parts of park maybe closed in fall/winter. Also an FYI do NOT take Shaffer Trail Road in Canyonlands: VERY steep, no guard rails, narrow in spots, dirt (Moki Dugway is tame by comparison and you should be okay on it). White Rim Road/trail is also dirt, narrow and on a precipice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 · (Edited)
Speed Trials with the Van Today ,,, Tomorrow we Shoot for The World Record

Sky Azure Font Rectangle Gas


Tire Sky Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire


Water Sky Dog People in nature Carnivore



Ya know ,,, It Kind Tastes Like “Salt” 😋

Ever since listening to this The Beach Boys song when I was a kid & reading about Craig Breedlove & “The Spirit of America” I have been wanting to see the Salt Flats. Today was pretty special for me.



 
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