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Discussion Starter #22
Installed the driver side platform base by locking it into the factory floor points. We all so connected both sides to the hip level profiles VHB taped to the chassis (for lateral stability ... not truly load bearing). With these things feeling rock solid, we spanned the van with 72" beams. We will add some perpendicular pieces to distribute weight of the bed. The cross beams show some flex when loaded up in a single point, but once fully constructed (w perpendiculars) and plywood distributing the load, they probably won't need any additional vertical support toward the rear.



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Discussion Starter #23
A cleaned up look. We decided (for now) not to add vertical pieces toward the rear of the vehicle in order to provide the most clearance options for bikes. We will see if this is practical as we go on. Natchee checks the clearance for his Huck toy.

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Discussion Starter #24
Installed AC outlets, inverter switch, and solar charge controller. The renogy-provided 2x 4awg connectors are too long for this space so I'll cut some 2/0 to length soon when i clean it all up.

Also mounted the PV panels on the roof (3 100 watt panels in series ... for now) and will run the cables to the charge controller via the backup camera housing.

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Very neat setup! With the MPPT controller on the other side of the red cutoff dial, does the MPPT controller turn off when the red cutoff dial is turned off? In other words, does EVERYTHING on the entire positive bussbar turn off when the red cutoff dial is turned off? Also, can you tell me what the little black box is on the left side, between the positive bussbar and the inverter? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Very neat setup! With the MPPT controller on the other side of the red cutoff dial, does the MPPT controller turn off when the red cutoff dial is turned off? In other words, does EVERYTHING on the entire positive bussbar turn off when the red cutoff dial is turned off? Also, can you tell me what the little black box is on the left side, between the positive bussbar and the inverter? Thanks!
Thanks.

It's a little tough to tell in this image, but the right side of the switch has the cyrix charging relay (this the little black box you mention), the inverter and the dc distribution box positive leads. The left side has the charge controller positive. This means that the charge controller remains connected to the battery (even with switch in the off position) unless manually disconnected (or if the fuse blows). This setup makes it much less likely that I fry the charge controller by forgetting the order of operations, but still gives me the convenience of cutting power to my loads.

So far the cyrix charging relay is treating me well. It's designed to connect and disconnect a lead acid starter to lithium batteries in certain conditions. It's easily programmed via the compatible victron bmv, but I'd only use it with 200 aH or more in your bank since the PM alternator is pretty beefy. If you're considering this product lmk and I'll give you more details - there ARE some drawbacks or places for improvement IMO.
 

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Thanks.

It's a little tough to tell in this image, but the right side of the switch has the cyrix charging relay (this the little black box you mention), the inverter and the dc distribution box positive leads. The left side has the charge controller positive. This means that the charge controller remains connected to the battery (even with switch in the off position) unless manually disconnected (or if the fuse blows). This setup makes it much less likely that I fry the charge controller by forgetting the order of operations, but still gives me the convenience of cutting power to my loads.

So far the cyrix charging relay is treating me well. It's designed to connect and disconnect a lead acid starter to lithium batteries in certain conditions. It's easily programmed via the compatible victron bmv, but I'd only use it with 200 aH or more in your bank since the PM alternator is pretty beefy. If you're considering this product lmk and I'll give you more details - there ARE some drawbacks or places for improvement IMO.
I haven't come across this cyrix relay before. My take is that you're using this cyrix relay to charge the house batteries from the starter battery, whereas I'm using a Sterling B2B between the two? Also, I had originally planned my busbars almost exactly like yours, with the ANL fuses and copper bars, but someone suggested I use circuit breakers instead of fuses so I could turn off individual components for troubleshooting; in your opinion, are the circuit breakers actually needed when the master disconnect is right there? Thank you so much for your very detailed information!
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
I haven't come across this cyrix relay before. My take is that you're using this cyrix relay to charge the house batteries from the starter battery, whereas I'm using a Sterling B2B between the two? Also, I had originally planned my busbars almost exactly like yours, with the ANL fuses and copper bars, but someone suggested I use circuit breakers instead of fuses so I could turn off individual components for troubleshooting; in your opinion, are the circuit breakers actually needed when the master disconnect is right there? Thank you so much for your very detailed information!
Most of what I know I learned a lot from Nate at Explorist.Life and Jacob/Taylor at Bend Battery here in Bend, OR. I'm definitely not an expert on any of this stuff, but I have learned a fair amount and am happy to discuss.

1) Yes your Sterling B2B serves the same purpose as the Cyrix Charge Li. There are some factors which may lead someone to choose one over the other, but the space/noise/heat from a B2B charger and the sufficient size of my battery bank pushed me to go this route.

2) DC circuit breakers can definitely function as switches, and I'll use them to connect solar panels to my charge controller for this exact convenience. I think the only place where you might run into some trouble is when you need fuses larger than 150a. The availability of the sizes I needed (200 and 250a) was suspect, but I'm sure you can find them if you look. As to what YOU should do, IMO it depends on your build. If you're going to need your inverter to keep working while you work on your DC wiring, for example, then circuit breakers make sense. But if you don't need that level of granularity (I don't) then the master switch is fine and much cheaper.

If you want lots of good advice about your electrical options, and some really sh!tty takes as well, you should post on the general thread. You'll get a ton of feedback.
 

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Most of what I know I learned a lot from Nate at Explorist.Life and Jacob/Taylor at Bend Battery here in Bend, OR. I'm definitely not an expert on any of this stuff, but I have learned a fair amount and am happy to discuss.

1) Yes your Sterling B2B serves the same purpose as the Cyrix Charge Li. There are some factors which may lead someone to choose one over the other, but the space/noise/heat from a B2B charger and the sufficient size of my battery bank pushed me to go this route.

2) DC circuit breakers can definitely function as switches, and I'll use them to connect solar panels to my charge controller for this exact convenience. I think the only place where you might run into some trouble is when you need fuses larger than 150a. The availability of the sizes I needed (200 and 250a) was suspect, but I'm sure you can find them if you look. As to what YOU should do, IMO it depends on your build. If you're going to need your inverter to keep working while you work on your DC wiring, for example, then circuit breakers make sense. But if you don't need that level of granularity (I don't) then the master switch is fine and much cheaper.

If you want lots of good advice about your electrical options, and some really sh!tty takes as well, you should post on the general thread. You'll get a ton of feedback.
Thanks for the reply!
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Solar is producing power and the bike drawer is in! Sliding 60" full extension drawer slides into the 80/20 channels involved pre-threading the outer member through holes with 1/4" machine screws and slide-in t nuts, and lubricating the 80/20 tslot channel with silicone spray to move the t nuts back.

The pv panels are currently wired in series but would be easy to switch to parallel with branch connecters and the same 10 awg wire with acceptable voltage drop. The 10 awg runs through the back up camera housing to avoid another hole in the van. Used the smallest entry gland I could find and trimmed the edges off so it would fit on the housing.

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Flexibility and adjustability of our layout has been a big priority for us. It gives us options to best use our space over time (or adjust its use as needs change) and gives potential buyers of the a rig some options in how to customize the vehicle for their needs.

That said, this update doesn't look like much. But was it EVER satisfying to complete. We've mounted flat profile 1530 80/20 to the ceiling to create super stable ceiling tracks. Think roof tracks but inside! We'll be using them for adjustable cabinetry over the planned galley, and for storage and mounting options over the bed and garage area.

By using #10 screws, cross nuts in the ceiling ribs, and a countersink, we were able to secure the rails AND keep the t-slot open. The connections are absolutely bomb proof as I was able to hang my 165 lbs (this is my quarantine weight) off them without a problem

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The close up below shows the countersunk #10 machine screws. The countersink bits BARELY nicks the flat profile edge but doesn't impede 5/16" carriage bolts used in the channel. The two lines below the screws are just dry erase marker for where we marked the holes. Will wipe these away with alcohol.

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The process is quite labor intensive because of the limited real estate on the ceiling ribs, the unforgiving nature of metal relative to wood, and the size constraint for screws. Existing holes of various shapes, dimensions and placements REALLY reduce the available connection points since we're limited to #10 or smaller screws to keep the t-slot useable.

The install process went like this:
1) Place the 80/20 profile against the ceiling in the desired location and mark (with dry erase marker for later removal) the desired locations of the holes on the profile.
2) Drill countersunk 3/16" holes in the middle of the 80/20 channel ... we used a countersink connected to the titanium drill bit as to make these holes in a single pass and it worked pretty well. You could probably opt for #8 (5/32") screws and NOT nick the profile face, but we wanted the biggest machine screws that the profile would accommodate.
3) Clean the shavings and WD off the profile and replace it onto the ceiling ribs.
4) Use a 3/16" or smaller drill bit to drill THROUGH the hole and create a hole in the ceiling rib in the desired location. This is to provide a very obvious place to drill and insert your cross nut or riv nut. Marking it with the dry erase marker ALMOST works, but because of the angle and slippery paint, you're likely to deviate from your desired mark and even 1 mm of slippage means your hole will not work.
5) Remove the 80/20 profile and enlarge the ceiling rib pilot holes with a 5/16" drill bit.
6) Vacuum out shavings and paint the hole for rust protection.
7) Insert cross nut.
8) Reinstall 80/20 profile and screw it in.
9) Drink some beer. Onto the next profile.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
We spent a day and a half framing up the kitchen galley, installing it, and getting our countertop set up. We also took the van out for it's maiden voyage (just a local trip to Paulina lake and Widgi Creek bouldering).

What worked: 3" mattress was great, electric system and inverter stood up to its stress test of simultaneous instant pot/rice cooker.
What didn't: need a step installed to get into the bed.
Next focus: installing ^ step, getting sliders into the galley for fridge and drawer, running AC and DC power to the galley

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Discussion Starter #35
How will you access the space in front of the wheel well?
We won't have a side wall for that cabinet so it'll be accessible from under the sink. Also will have a top access from over the bed platform with a removable or hinged panel. It's going to be extra storage for things we don't access often like the vehicle jack.
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Great minds think alike. 😁 My analogous area is accessed from the top. It’s bottom layer contains antifreeze, shovel, brake fluid, tire pump. Above that, extra cups, toilet bags, etc.
Love your build. Did you plan for that analogous area from the beginning?

My design has kind of "evolved" as we've built. With a time machine I might consider going back 2 months and planning for the batteries and electrical panels to live in front of the driver side wheel well instead of the passenger, but I haven't built the time machine yet.
 

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From the beginning, I knew it would be "dead storage," simply because it was obvious there would be no easy access—like the corner of a kitchen. This is one reason I’m not a fan of cabinetry in front of both sides of the bed—double the "dead storage."
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Why is your bed that high? Looks like lots of room over the bike.
The bed is 37.5" off the floor but the wideangle view makes it look higher here. We remove the front wheels to connect to the fork mounts which are embedded into the drawer in multiple configurations (any combination of road and mountain bikes).

For the road bike (pictured), the handlebars have plenty of clearance but the saddle barely clears with the seat post slammed. On our mountain bikes the handlebars sneak under and seats have plenty of clearance.
 
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