Ram Promaster Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
923 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
scouting....i got to carry/pack 1/2 pup tent
constant watching mpg
decided I hate commercial airplane experience
like shower daily
Like moderate weather without rain
have bucket list of places

Sent from my LG-H871 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Van #2 2021 EXT
Joined
·
2,840 Posts
Hi @baitbegger44##

Well ,,, In our case after resisting my Wife’s focus on acquiring an RV I finally gave in to her & could not be more happy with the decision.

The Primary Goal - A Travel Van

We love traveling around North America & seeing the sights & learning about our part of the world. We have been blessed with both commercial & private air travel, motorcycle travel, & automobile travel for decades (all require hotel rooms). Now we prefer taking the van & no hotel.

Van Travel is as quick as any motorcycle or automobile without the hassle of planning for a hotel room every night. No need to look for a facility cause we have to pee. No need to eat at restaurants constantly. It is just so easy. The 3500 EXT although roomy inside, isn’t much bigger than a standard size pickup truck. So if we did want to stay in a hotel or motel while on a trip we could (or go to a restaurant).

So for us, it really is not a “Camper Van” but a “Travel Van”.
 

·
Registered
2017 159" High Roof
Joined
·
176 Posts
I always wanted an RV, and I like building things. We’ve done some pretty extensive home remodeling and upgrades but never anything like this.

My wife didn’t share my enthusiasm for the project at first. I made her watch a bunch of YouTube videos to get a feel of what it’d look like which seemed to start to bring her around. “So where’s Josie going to sleep in this van?” She kept saying. She got hooked on this “Sara and James” video of an elevator bed in the back with a lounge below that converted into the other bed. That was the design that she wanted.

It still took a big fight for me to finally get the final go ahead to buy the van - $19,500 for a 2017 high roof 159 with 106k. If the dealer tried any last minute shenanigans with the sale price the deal would have fallen though. The build is still in progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
We've always loved nature, hiking, etc, just not "camping". But we got hooked on renting RVs (Class B+) as a way to tour the backroads of Europe, off the beaten tourist tracks. Eventually we wanted our own RV to do the same in NAmerica. We decided to convert a van so we could design around our own priorities, make our own compromises, and save money to boot. We built a fully-functional Class-B with a unique layout that suits our needs perfectly. And now we are so thankful to have done that before COVID hit. We've been touring our own amazing backyard, Vancouver Island.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 136 low roof
Joined
·
73 Posts
Like most of you have said, we love nature, camping, hiking, paddling, sailing, and travel. For many years we were tent campers around our Oregon home base and the Pacific northwest, Canada, Alaska, New Zealand and Africa. Had a VW Westy for a while and built a Chevy Astro about 10 years ago. It has served us well but as we reached our 70's and became semi-retired, we wanted a bit more space and luxury. The Promaster seemed like the logical choice and I was eager to build something, so here I am.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Extreme frugality and a desire to travel with many of the comforts of home, but without making advance plans. The thought of spending $50-$250 for a room with bed and a shower never did sit well with me (especially when I was only there to sleep). For what I once spent on one or two nights of prime time lodging in a popular area, I can now live and enjoy that area for almost a week! Even worse was renting an expensive room for a week and then having foul weather ruin the trip. With the van I can cancel or change plans on the spot, and it doesn't cost a dime.
 

·
Registered
2020 Promaster 2500, 159wb
Joined
·
72 Posts
We camp summers in our Rpod travel trailer and love the outdoors. Hate that in November it gets winterized and sits unoccupied till April.

Got the van for winter camping and couldn't be happier. We ski most weekends and now can avoid the very expensive hotel costs at ski resorts. We've camped this winter at Sunlight Mountain, Monarch Ski Area, Powderhorn Ski Area, Ski Copper and a few trips to Moab, UT and Fruita, CO in the Spring for hiking and biking.

The PM makes a great tow vehicle/ toy hauler when pulling the Rpod. We now pile all the toys, paddleboards, bikes, duckies and floaties in the van and don't have to stack in the Rpod on our trips.

Promaster was affordable and has a great track record, so far we are delighted!

Happy trails!
 

·
Registered
2017 - 2500 159
Joined
·
904 Posts
Always loved exploring and seeing new places. Also always wanted freedom from a permanent location. Unfortunately I also always have to work to earn money to buy things to survive and save, but after 12 years of marriage, a sudden opportunity to work from home, and some money from the sale of a rental property, I got the go ahead from my wife to buy a van. Moved to a small town last September to save on rent and make it easier to build out the van on the street. I have 4 months to finish the build and downsize or tiny apartment even further.

We also love nature and hiking. That's not the primary reason for the van, but it should be nice to spend some time glamping.
 

·
Registered
2021, Promaster 159 HR 2500, Silver
Joined
·
152 Posts
My love of travel was in direct conflict with my love of dogs. Now the dogs can go with me. I live alone and am a total introvert. However, covid has really isolated me more than I care to be. I am hoping to visit all of my friends and take dogs along. Hoping for a trip to Alaska in August-September if Canada opens back up by then.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
686 Posts
Mostly from a few experiences:

1) Co-op work in IA (late 70s)
  • The day + night that I drove from OH to IA, I hit a major New Years eve storm
  • Tried to get off the highway to a hotel but there was so much snow the car got stuck and I had to dig my way back to the main road and continue
  • The next morning in IA it was (-29 F) and practically nothing electrical worked.
  • I guess because I had driven so much the engine had kept the vehicle battery sufficiently warm and charged that the car started, but none of the vehicle displays worked.
  • The car seat was completely non pliable - essentially a solid block
  • The weather more or less repeated for the next month with misc experiences of being stuck, etc.
  • Fortunately the locals were very helpful and friendly.
  • Strongly influenced my desire for things to work when it is really cold out.

2) Camping Trip
  • OR + N CA early 80s
  • 1 year old + pregnant wife
  • Chevy Camero + roof top box with everything in it
  • Camping nubes and we slept in a small tent
  • My snoring kept the baby awake so I ended up sleeping outside on the ground
  • There were challenges to make warm food for an infant as needed
  • Influenced my desire to have a comfortable place for the kids that is separate from my own sleeping location.


3) 9-11
  • After the event, the company I worked for banned air travel for quite a while
  • I still needed to visit customers in OR, N - CA, S-CA, AZ and NM, so I drove
  • Hotels rooms were hard to find, especially with a variable schedule
  • Sometimes I would be very tired while driving between stops or on the way home, and could not find a place to sleep, even for a few hours
  • Temperatures on the trip routinely well over 100 F - 115 is not that uncommon.
  • This was especially problematic in the summer so before I had heard of a mobile office concept, I came to the conclusion that I needed something like that - with battery powered air conditioning.
  • Really drove my desire for battery powered air conditioning and higher voltage setups.

4) Power outages, especially during fire season
  • It became clear that up sizing the van power system so it could also be a home emergency back up power was useful (annual)
  • Also a post earthquake preparedness, which is a "when" not an "if".
  • Helps me to justify more powerful electrical systems than one just for camping use.
 

·
Registered
2020 159 HR
Joined
·
63 Posts
I'm a life-long windsurfer, grew up in Germany. So combine a sport that requires ridiculous amounts of bulky (but not very heavy) gear, that's conditions dependent and thus makes flexibility as to when and where you go on a trip mandatory, with being steeped in European small RV/camper culture (Westfalias and mini-RVs built on VW Transporters and the predecessors of Merc Sprinters), and vans have always been the eventual end point. Yep, there were compromises along the way (living in the Bay Area, having young kids, lots of commuting, what have you), but now I find myself with a 159 HR as my daily driver (well, daily driving only happens when I chase wind or run an errand that my ebike can't cover - all commuting pretty much happens on the bike), outfitted to be a great camper for my wife and me, a great mountain bike/windsurf/ski mobile, and even serves as a driveway guest room.

Main needs were maximizing livable space for two, accommodating one or two rear passengers, carrying a hitch rack full of mountain bikes, and of course ample storage for windsurf gear under the platform bed. Mission accomplished, stoke level high.
 

·
Registered
2020 - 159” HR
Joined
·
26 Posts
My wife and I had plans to build a tinyhome and move to Colorado. She died and I figured the house was a lot for a one-man operation. Started the van on a grief induced whim, but now I'm going back to school in August and plan on living in it during my clinical rotations. Also, I like the security of having a shelter at all times. I travel quite a bit, so it's honestly been the perfect rig so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
My desire to have a tiny home --> I saw cool videos of vans that looked like tiny homes --> COVID gave me the time to do it. COVID also killed the desire to travel by plane / stay in hotels. Really Covid changed so much of what I want in my future, and a vacation home on wheels, where I could explore new places and people, sounded perfect.
 

·
Registered
2014 136” HR
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
Step 1: The chicken house that was cleaned out each summer so I could have a playhouse. That introduced me to the sense of freedom.

Step 2: Two Westies that refused to run when they were supposed to. Imagine loading up three kids for the 2-week vacation and the van dies before it gets out of town. The PM is my "VW that runs".

Step 3: A Ducato camper passing us in New Zealand. It was love at first sight.

Step 4: MrNomer's hands becoming cold sensitive as we set up/down the truck tent we enjoyed for 10 years. That experience taught us a lot about what we wanted.
 

·
Premium Member
2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
Joined
·
2,130 Posts
Really liked the idea of an RV that drives and parks like a car.
Really liked the idea (after 3 regular RVs) of only including the things I really wanted in the build.
Really like the open feel we were able to attain by leaving out all the junk we did not want.

Gary
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top