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Discussion Starter #41
Getting your plan double-checked by someone familiar with solar power (not necessarily any electrician) is the right thing to do.👍
I upped it a little. 2x 180w=360. I think I can fit those two panels, the hatch and the fan. I can't leave the cab window open at night in a city because I would't feel safe at night. But I definitely will get a solar power pro to help me. I'd rather get rid of electrical draws than the hatch/skylight. My fridge is a 12v compressor fridge so that should be very efficient. THE ROOF 180-02.png
 

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2014 136” HR
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If I didn’t have opening windows, I’d want an inlet low so I could feel a breeze over my face and body. But then, if I didn’t have opening windows, I wouldn’t know what I was missing.
 

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2018 136 HR Ont.
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If I didn’t have opening windows, I’d want an inlet low so I could feel a breeze over my face and body.
When I turn on the ceiling fan with the rear upper vents open the cool air coming in drops onto the bed area and travels across it providing a nice cooling effect. If you pull in cool air from low vents it will travel along the floor and mix with the hotter air in the van but will not create much upper air movement. You won't feel air from floor vents on your face and body unless you are laying on the floor. It's convection, cool air descends and hot air rises so upper vents are very good for evacuating hot air and creating air movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
MY VAN ARRIVED! Thanks to the great advise I got here, and what it looked when I marked out all the furniture on the actual van, I redid the floor plan with the kitchen on the side.

There is a 6" step up to the bed/dining area. The tile in the pic is on the step's rise.

I'll have one lagun table with 2 mounts.

(I might get a passenger swivel seat later, and possibly a heater under the seat.)

QUESTIONS: 1. what's the best way to run the plumbing? I've got one water pump set-up. I can go along the driver's side to the shower, but I'll need to hide the pipes between the seating and the shower, or I can go up and hide them in the bins. Cutting across to the kitchen is easy. Any advise on this?

2. can I put havelock wool in these lower cavities? KeepOnVanning on one thread once said not to put insulation somewhere and I couldn't tell from the photo where that somewhere was.

3. can I run the plumbing like this (pic below)?

THANKS!

70950



70949
 

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You could run pex in the rocker panels, but it would be incredibly hard to winterize if you cold camp. That's the spot not to insulate. Leaver the rocker panels and low spots on the doors free so that any moisture that does form can escape again
 

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Discussion Starter #52
You could run pex in the rocker panels, but it would be incredibly hard to winterize if you cold camp. That's the spot not to insulate.
How about if I hide the pipes in a baseboard arrangement? That could look cool if done right, and it would be easily removable.
70952

Leave the rocker panels and low spots on the doors free so that any moisture that does form can escape again
I figured that was the logic. THANKS!
 

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2018 3500 EXT
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How about if I hide the pipes in a baseboard arrangement? That could look cool if done right, and it would be easily removable.
View attachment 70952

I figured that was the logic. THANKS!
That is better than in the rocker panels (which are best kept un-insulated).

If your “cabinets” have a “kick” space you can run pipe or wires under them. Typical house “kicks” are 4” high, you could do much less in a van. Or you could “ditch” pipe & wires at the very back of the cabinet, but on the warm-side (inside) of the van.

Serviceability of wires & pipes is also a good consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Or you could “ditch” pipe & wires at the very back of the cabinet, but on the warm-side (inside) of the van.
I'll do that for the kitchen on the passenger side, but on the driver's side, there's a 2.5' length with no furniture.
 

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I like the idea of those hollow baseboards. I haven't seen them before, but it's the same concept as a soffit or trough while more aesthetically pleasant. Definitely better than wiremold
 

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I'll do that for the kitchen on the passenger side, but on the driver's side, there's a 2.5' length with no furniture.
I see.

I have utilized “wire chase baseboards” in office buildings to hide data cables.

You could simply make your own “baseboard” cover to fit whatever pipe size you wanted to hide @ the floor/wall intersection.

Could be made from; wood, sheetmetal, aluminum angle, etc.

You might find a profile of extruded aluminum that might work for ya.






just some examples.
 

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Speaking of toe kick, I've been wondering if it's a good idea in a van. Our current apartment only has this on one spot maybe 2 ft long or less. Basically light prep, cocktails, coffee. I just went over there and I don't think I have ever stood close enough to get my toes under there. In the van, raising everything a few inches wastes all that space. Does anyone even like toe kick?
 

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I like toe kicks in front of the sink with a heat register in it. It's the only counter space I really stand all the way up to. Maybe another one with a central vac near a prep space, but now I'm just talking fancy. Definitely agree it's wasted space otherwise.
Don't think it's necessary for van cabinets. Countertop overhangs are just as effective and increase surface area. They make more sense to me in the home setting also. They do raise cabinets to the correct height if using prefab ones.
 

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2018 3500 EXT Camper Conversion in CT (TX for now due to Covid)
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A couple of comments about your electrical (remember that I'm a noob also):
....
3) 4/0 cables are super thick. Are you sure you need them that big? Maybe your electrical system is spread out (longer cables need to be thicker). I built mine intentionally compact and close to the engine battery so my thickest cables are AWG 2 between my bus bars and my 3000W inverter.
2 gauge is not enough for 3000 watts, at 12 volts that is 250 amps.

unless your wires are water cooled or have insulation rated to over 200F, 2 guage is not sufficient for 3000 watts at 12V.

If you have a 24v or 48v system then that would be ok.

I am going to assume you don't use 3000 watts out of the inverter, because if you did I am almost certain you would have a failure in a short period of time.

for that load 4/0 would be my call and I think most electrical codes agree.
 
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