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Discussion Starter #2
Burning question #1 is weight distribution.

Plan is rear bed, driver side kitchen, 3 5 gal jugs for fresh & grey water.

Life is simpler if the batteries are on the driver side. But that puts all the weigh on the drivers side. Problem?
 

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Put the galley with water, refrigerator, etc on the door side, it can occupy part of the door space. I loved to cook with the slider open or looking out the slider window
 

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Yeah, if you're shooting for what I would call a fairly standard layout and you have a 136 with a bed across the back, you're gonna run out of room quick on the driver side.
I'd consider what RD said and do the kitchen by the slider and electrical on the driver side. Maybe have the water and sink on on pass side and fridge and batteries on driver's(?)
 

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Or you can have fridge, microwave, 5 drawers (one of them huge), stool storage and a 56” counter behind the driver plus electric and a battery. This is in a 136” with space between bed and rear doors.
 

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MsNomer, do you have your sink and water storage by the slider, or is all that on driver side too?
I don't remember
 

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We do not have a sink with jugs. If we had one, it would have to be on passenger side, but in 5 years, we’ve never needed one. We do have a non-plumbed pan on the driver's side, but we just use it to store potentially messy things. For coffee, etc., we keep a 1-gallon water jug behind the passenger seat.
 

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I'm sure it's possible, but it might be tough to squeeze batteries/electrical, sink, water jugs, fridge, basically every function in the space between the driver seat and bed. Plus that's all the weight on one side. Probably not a huge concern, but it doesn't hurt to spread the weight out a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Or you can have fridge, microwave, 5 drawers (one of them huge), stool storage and a 56” counter behind the driver plus electric and a battery. This is in a 136” with space between bed and rear doors.
MsNomer I was inspired by your build and by your comment about enjoying and protecting your open space on the passenger side.

I'm planning a 31" wide bed back as far as it will go. I think that gives me 72" of counter on the drivers side. I certainly can fit everything in there. I'm concerned about all the weight on one side. Two batteries at 60+ pounds each, 10 gallons of water = 80 pounds and me (more than batteries plus water).

Now that I actually have the van I can do some cardboard aided design and mull things over.

Joel
 

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Adding a permanent toilet to the passenger side has given us a new perspective—height is critical. In addition to its primary purpose, the toilet gives us a convenient seat near the door for putting on boots, etc., without turning a seat. It also functions as a seat for the pullout table. Because it is low, it is unobtrusive. In your case, particularly given that you have a longer space and there’s only one of you, consider a seat with batteries on the floor underneath. You might even have some major electrical gadgets like inverter above the batteries. My seat/toilet is 20” tall.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I can't believe it's only been 19 days. I probably lurked for a while before joining.

Thank you all for inspiration and education. And it's only cost me $32,600 so far (using Vaniels Spreadsheet).

Today I ordered some sound deadening and roller and a Pocket Jig.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
One Week Update

It's Saturday Morning and I'm going to take the LAWT up on a mountain top to play Amateur Radio.

Humor: The emergency break lever tilts up. I wear shorts. Three times I have gotten hung up, painfully suspended, difficult to extract. Yes, it took me three times to learn to grab the shorts before exiting.

It's miserable hot. I can work 7-10 and then have to quit.

Bought stuff. Notably the Fan 7500K from Camping World. Said it was in stock. Then mid-week Back ordered. They have my money, GOK when I'll have a fan. I'm going to put it in back. If I leave the back area between the back rib & next one forward untouched will I be ok to put the fan in when it arrives?

Weighted the Van. 3200 lbs front, 1900 rear.

Bought an extra sheet of 1/2" plywood and built a step as a training exercise. Glue and nails. MsNomer would have given me an F but it's functional and with sanding the bumps off and paint it won't look too bad.

Took out the factory floor. Up was not bad. Out was a two man job.

Cut and placed 1/2" polyiso (Rmax) and 1/2" plywood. Waiting for help to get the factory floor back in.

Put Noico on the wheel wells.

Start insulation Monday.

Plans. I'm starting the think passenger side cabinet with a battery box/seat on the driver's side.
RD how much of your cabinet is in the door? You posted that somewhere but I can't find it.

I had planned on my 31" wide bed all the way to the back which left me some of the wheel well up front to deal with. I'll going to move the front edge up even with the end of the wheel wells. That will give me 15" in the back for all the wonderful uses MsNomer has described. Plus bedside shelves on the rear side.

Obligatory power diagram:


IMG_20200715_094430840_HDR.jpg
 

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I left 26” of the door space open for entry and egress and I feel that is about right. IIRC that means the cabinet extended 24” into the door space.
Putting that cabinet on the door side I had my water and refrigerator over there to balance the weight.
 

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LAWT ?

Google was unproductive.

edit: Never mind, found it:
 

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IF we are clicking the parking brake handle ratchet more than FIVE//SIX times - we are either playing with it or just like to live dangerously... ?

A reading from the Book of Mopar: 05 - Brakes / Brakes, Base / Parking Brake / Standard Procedure plus SHOES, Parking Brake / Adjustments...

NOTE: The parking brake shoes used in the drum-in-hat park brake system do not automatically adjust to compensate for brake shoe lining wear. Therefore, it is necessary to manually adjust the parking brake shoes.

1. Verify the parking brake lever is in the released (down) position.
2. Raise and support the vehicle.
3. Remove the wheel mounting bolts, then the tire and wheel assembly.
4. Install a couple wheel mounting bolts to hold the brake rotor in place while adjustment of the brake shoes is made. NOTE: To find the adjuster wheel with the brake rotor on, position the hole in the front of the rotor drum as follows: •Left side – 7 o'clock. •Right side – 5 o'clock.
NOTE: When adjusting the parking brake shoes with the drum-in hat rotor installed, rotating the adjuster wheel upward will loosen the adjustment. Rotating the adjuster wheel downward will tighten the adjustment.
5. Utilizing a hole in the front of the rotor, make a fine adjustment of the shoes.
6. Lower the vehicle far enough to access the interior of the vehicle.
7. Reach inside the vehicle and cycle (fully apply and release) the park brakes.
8. With the parking brake lever in the fully applied (up) position, attempt to hand rotate each rear brake rotor to ensure that the parking brake shoes are working properly.
9. With the parking brake lever in the released (down) position, hand rotate each rear brake rotor to ensure that the parking brake shoes are not dragging.

STANDARD PROCEDURE - PARKING BRAKE ADJUSTMENT

3. Loosen the jam nut (2) and lightly tighten the equalizer nut (1).
4. Using an assistant in the vehicle, apply and release the hand brake lever 5 times to fully seat the parking brake components (1).
5. To measure the force on the hand brake lever, the force gauge must be placed 40 mm (1.57 in) from the tip of the grip, perpendicular to the lever handle (2).
6. Using the force gauge, adjust the rear cable tension by rotating the equalizer nut (1) to achieve 80 N (18 lbf) with the hand brake lever at the fifth click.
7. Re-measure the input force at the hand brake lever at the fifth click to ensure it is still at 80 ± 5N (18 lbf ± 18 ozf ). 8. Holding the equalizer nut (1), tighten the jam nut (2) to 15 Nm (11 lb-ft).
9. Actuate the parking brake to ensure that it is functioning properly.
10. Lower the vehicle.

What they don't show is the return spring is lightweight and easily corrodes, while adjusting take a long look at that...

Anyhow, been a while since the PB adjust routine has been mentioned, keep your shorts on!

64817
 
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