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Discussion Starter #1
Recently traded the Tundra in on a 2019 159 HR. The first (only) option on the priority list was driver/pass 6way seats. This one had them and one better-....both heated. Only a few other options that I could've lived without, but will make use of them since I have 'em. It has 2 factory LED strip lights on the ceiling and it's prewired for rear aux heat. It also came with a 1/4" thick rubberized/plastic cargo floor mat. I used it to trace the rigid foam ins boards and put it back in.
I laid down a single 12' sheet of 2mil plastic and used loctite window&door foam to lay a thin bead in-between the raised floor ridges. My theory is that the window&door stuff won't over-expand. It wasn't so much for insulation as it was to add support in the low spots, since I only used 1/2" board. Did one section at a time and then threw the cargo mat back in. I know a lot of folks put down 1" foam and another 3/4" of ply over that. Which I'm sure is very strong and a great R value, but I'm trying to keep it as light weight as possible and keep as much height as possible. Not to mention keep cost as low as possible. So far, I'm into it for about $60.
The reason for the 2mil plastic is that I can pull it all out relatively easily should I screw something up or it doesn't work well, or just want to change it.
I'm also going to make inserts for the tiedowns which will help hold it down. But I don't see it going anywhere, as the mat is heavy and I won't be jumping any train tracks at 70mph.
Not sure if this build will move along at a good pace, or take a year. But, I'll update as I go and hopefully come up with a few clever tricks and get some good advice along the way.
Oh, and I plan to cut the back edge to a straight line and trim both back and side door entrances. Just have to come up with a material and a way to secure it, yet make it removable for maint.
 

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Thanks for the update. Awesome progress!

. . . I won't be jumping any train tracks at 70mph. . . .
Pfffft I guess no one will want to ride in your van then . . . well unless you are stopping off for ice cream!

I like your idea of the 2mil, and the low expansion foam in the valleys of the floor. You may see that in another build soon :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll report back after a few days on how it's working out. If nothing weird happens, I'll leave it in and continue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I'm a little concerned with that.
I'll have to be clever with how I trim out the entrance thresholds.
 

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We in the building industry, have come to never use two layers of materials that are vapor barriers. Since the van body is one it may not have been a good idea to introduce another (the 2 mil Polyethylene). Condensation occurs between them and remains for a log time rotting wood in our houses and rusting metal. Many here have ended up with just the foam over the ribs leaving air channels to let moisture vaporize and escape and 1/2” plywood for a hard surface making a 1” floor. After 4 1/2 years I have had my floor out and the van’s floor looks like the day it was first covered!
58632
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I just checked the floor. The expanding foam stuck to the insulation board and not the plastic drop cloth.
So I will pull it all out, take the plastic out and put the floor back in.
I'm glad it didn't stick to the plastic because I really didn't want to leave it in, because of the chance of water getting trapped under it.
The expanding foam has some give, but it was a much faster, cheaper way to semi-fill the voids, compared to cutting a bunch of strips, If I could even find any that were 5/16". Plus the foam is more resistant to moisture damage.
It did it's job and the floor is much better than it would be with nothing in the voids. Also, it didn't completely full them so air can still get around under there.
Next, I have to see if I can find the plastic tie-down inserts they make for the factory wood floor. Hopefully I can buy them separately.
 

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Interesting, so the minimally expanding foam, after having the 2-mil plastic removed, basically made custom height shims that are pre-adhered to the insulating foam. Very nice!

I have the factory tie-down inserts. Not ready to sell them but if you have access to a 3-d printer, I could measure them so you could make a model and print them out :)
 

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It still is work for nothing as filling the floor ribs is unnecessary and actually counterproductive. Just span the ribs with 25 psi ridgid foam and add a plywood floor above. The dead air spaces and thermal break coupled with the reflective sided Polyisocyanurate is effective and easy to do. Glad it worked for you but there is no need to encourage others to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not encouraging others to do it. Just documenting the things I'm trying out. I wouldn't encourage or discourage anything I'm doing until I know one way or another if it's a good idea.
I didn't use the expanding foam as insulation. It's for support because I only wanted to use 1/2" foam board and reuse the 1/4" plastic cargo mat that came with the van. That combo is too thin and flexible to not add at least a little support to the valleys in the floor. I don't want to use Plywood at this point. The cargo mat is waterproof, flexible, easy to clean and easy to remove if I need to make changes or install anything later on. I may go to a plywood floor in the future, but for now I'm keeping the mat.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I guess I should clarify my goals/intentions/situation and why I might be experimenting and/or making some of the decisions I'm making.
The Van will be my daily commuter vehicle. I had one vehicle and traded it for the van. So, I still only have one vehicle.
My intention is to be mindful of weight, as I have a 20 mi, 35-45 minute commute to work (depending on weather & traffic), right through the city. That is also why my goal is to have a fairly basic setup and make the majority of the build modular and removable. I don't want to cart the camper parts 365 days p/yr. Whenever we take time off and plan a road trip, I will start prepping the van and installing the camper innards a few days prior and then remove them when we return.
Also, we both still work full-time, my wife has had 4 back surgeries and is having a 2nd neck surgery in Dec. In addition, we are currently in the tail end of building a new home and remodeling our current home so we can sell. It is a 20 mi commute to work, a 20 mi commute to the new house after work and a 20 mi commute back home. A 60 mi triangle that I've driven almost daily for close to 3 yrs now (I did/am doing a large portion of the build). And with the lawsuit we are currently in the middle of with the builder, on top of everything else, I'm pressed for time and money to have any fun.
Our last trip was to GC as my wife has never been, we had to fly out, rent a vehicle and fly home. It was very expensive for a quick 3-4 day trip. But, it was a bit of a test run. She's been saying she would like to travel and see more of the country for the last 5 yrs. My wife really enjoyed it out west and liked the road trip. So, when we got home, I decided I would trade the truck in for a van and when things settle down (hopefully by next summer), we can take 2 weeks off at a time, instead of 4 days, and actually do a relaxed road trip and spend quality time driving around and seeing the country.
In the short term, I'm trying to keep the build affordable, clever and account for expanding/improving in the future.
If it were up to me, we would have more money and time, I would have a different commuter vehicle and the van would sit parked, so I could do a really nice build and only drive it for road trips.
If we are still able, that is likely something we can do when we retire. But for now, I have to keep the build as lightweight, affordable and practical as possible.
And some of the things I try or come up with, may not work out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I will admit, I'm excited about the van and have probably spent waaaay too much time on here lately.
But, it's too easy with being able to do it on the phone and I have that dam thing with me all the time.
Work has been paused on the house until everything gets straightened out. And I worked till 7 pm all this week to finish a project at work, so I decided to sit on my rear all day today and just do paperwork and hang out here, on the laptop.
 

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You are forgiven. Don’t ask again!
My build is similar to what you may be aiming for. The refrigerator is the heaviest thing to remove when I un-camperize it. All the other modular parts weigh 30# or less I believe. The galley is the heaviest but has good handles and I get my wife to assist. She can handle her end.
I’ve built two houses since I “retired” for her and I. No contractor and each took 5 years working 6 months at a time (total 2.5 full years each working mostly alone) I know the routine. No lawsuits though.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I hired them to build a custom modular home. I did all the sitework, driveway and utilities to save money.
They missed every deadline and the only thing there wasn't a problem with on the entire home was the framing. I kicked them out at the end of Feb and the house still wasn't finished and none of the mistakes or shoddy work was fixed. We were supposed to be moving in Oct/Nov.
Anyway, the house isn't worth what we've already paid, not including what we've invested in repairing mistakes since they left, not to mention costing us attorney fees and an extra, what will likely be 2 yrs of our life. They told their attorney that the house was done and perfect and we were trying to stiff on the last bit of of money.
They were a 5 star company and the same time we hired them, they moved some personnel around and brought in new management. They fell apart and us and 3-4 other customers got screwed over last summer. Found out they were going out of business while they were supposed to be building our house. So they had no money and were hiring hacks off Craigslist to finish their homes. It was/is s nightmare.
Just have to go to court and wrap the legal crap up, then I can finish the house myself and move in. Then finish the dump we live in now and get rid of it.
That's all I gotta do! Just a few things.
Then we can relax and take few road trips after I make this van road trip worthy.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Enough of that malarkey.
Back to vans.
So, back when I considered doing a little soundproofing in the truck, actual automotive sound deadening mat was pricey. I found out that a lot of folks were using the 1/8" foam duct insulation that was self stick and foil backed. Worked well for what it cost.
I was pricing materials a few days ago and saw the duct insulation at Depot for $22. 1'x 15'.
It works out to roughly the same $ p/sq ft as the sound deadening mat.
But I found some online for $14 p/roll. So it would be roughly $1 p/sg ft.
I was looking to cover pretty much the entire inside of the van, except the ribs. The duct insulation is more for the reflective covering than the sound deadening, though it would help with that also. I don't really like the relectix because it has to be glued on and it can't be molded tightly to the surface like the thin duct insulation. So, I want to cover the entire skin, then loose insulation in the ribs, then batting over everything, then paneling.
Does anyone think that much coverage with the reflective surface will help enough to justify $2-250?
Also, I would really like to use the white, recycled plastic batting insulation. So far, it seems like they only sell in the UK? Anyone able to find any in the US?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm actually surprised I haven't seen this stuff being used. Unless maybe it was tried long ago and determined to not be good to use?
Or it is used and I haven't seen it yet?
Seems like everyone sticks to the polyiso, thinsulate, reflectix, expanding foam and sound deadening mat. Was this stuff already ruled out, or just not thought of?
 

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... it's been done/used, however questinable in insulation value (too thin I'd say) and if you are insulating with whatever on top of this, then it is unlikely to enhance the overall performance for sound deadening (or insulation) to any worthwhile degree and thus imo just an extra step that is not really needed...?
 

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I used 1 roll for some hair brain idea, tore some of it out. Come to think of it, I use it cover the roof ribs, that stayed.
 
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