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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Was gonna use thinsulate to do all of my 118 Low roof but saw that it was 12 bucks per linear foot. :eek: I thought I saw on a another thread that a while back it was 9 something per linear foot and at the time on sale for 8.88/LF. Was not expecting that much of an increase. So is there any product similar that is a bit cheaper. Not stiff insulation like Polyiso which I am sure it is very good and may still use on my ceiling. I want something flexible and fluffy like the thinsulate.

Was wonderin' also how many LF of the thinsulate would I need to do all of my 118 Low Roof? 30 ft?? thanks.
 

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Was gonna use thinsulate to do all of my 118 Low roof but saw that it was 12 bucks per linear foot. :eek: I thought I saw on a another thread that a while back it was 9 something per linear foot and at the time on sale for 8.88/LF. Was not expecting that much of an increase. So is there any product similar that is a bit cheaper. Not stiff insulation like Polyiso which I am sure it is very good and may still use on my ceiling. I want something flexible and fluffy like the thinsulate.

Was wonderin' also how many LF of the thinsulate would I need to do all of my 118 Low Roof? 30 ft?? thanks.
Exactly, i noticed that and may have to back out of it since im not planning to live in it.
 

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Those fabrics at Seattle Fabrics are for clothing and bedding. I am familiar with them and not one of them would be satisfactory for this application.
 

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Actually the polyiso and great stuff is easier to do on the walls than the ceiling anyway. In this case fluffy will be a LOT more expensive and the ridgid foam is better. Get control of your minds thought that fluffy is better and move on.
 

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Was gonna use thinsulate to do all of my 118 Low roof but saw that it was 12 bucks per linear foot.
It's $8.88 per linear foot plus shipping for the SM600L.
SM400L and AU4002-5 (both 1") are less if you want to save costs.
We will also have TAI 1547 (~1/4" thick) after the first of the year.

30 LF would be plenty for your 118.

All the best,
Hein
DIYvan.com
 

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I did the polyiso and found it easy and quick so I have a bias. 1” polyiso for your van would be $100 plus the gun and 2 cans of foam each at $14 so $150 to insulate that same area. I’d pull Thinsulate into the ribs if you decide to do that but it is probably unnecessary. Thinsulate over the cab and in inside some doors could be done too. But then again its just money and the Thinsulate seems to be a good product.
 

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At the risk of triggering some sort of religious war; may I ask if plain old polyester batting (for quilts or other needlework projects) would be a potential substitute for thinsulate?

I've got a situation where I'm bulking up on the meager insulation that was pre-installed in my Carado Axion. It looks like they used a foil backed fiberglass insulation in the big and easy to reach cavities and nothing in places like the sliding door and vertical ribs of the van. I'm thinking polyester batting might be a good solution for all the nooks and crannies since I wouldn't be able to create a seamless vapor barrier between them and the panels anyway.

Thoughts?
 

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No. It sounds reasonable in theory, but I have experience with both. Those battings would not retain their integrity in an unsupported vertical environment, particularly with vibration. They would slither into a heap at the bottom of your cavity, leaving on the wall only the few strands held by your glue. There's a reason why quilts are quilted. The only ones I know with an R-value approaching that of Thinsulate, Climashield and Primaloft, are as expensive as Thinsulate. Primaloft instructions call for rather tight quilting. Climashield does not require quilting, but retains its integrity by clinging to the cotton fabric on the two sides of the quilt. I was working with Climashield yesterday and had to make sure it wasn't skewed every time I cut--the two sides move independently. In a wall cavity, that shear would happen before you could button it up.

The Thinsulate that Hein sells is also a different animal from the Thinsulate sold for quilting, etc. It is created specifically for our vertical vibrating environment.

Hein's $8.88/yd is the same as I paid three years ago. Put the cost into the context of the entire build. It's a blip.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's $8.88 per linear foot plus shipping for the SM600L.
SM400L and AU4002-5 (both 1") are less if you want to save costs.
We will also have TAI 1547 (~1/4" thick) after the first of the year.

30 LF would be plenty for your 118.

All the best,
Hein
DIYvan.com
Okay. Is shipping $100 to Austin, Tx? I see the Amazon and ebay prices are with free shipping but figures to be about $12 per linear foot with the free shipping. Do you have 30 feet of the SM600L currently in stock? Also do you have the gasket for the MaxAir fan in stock?

I finally got my build design figured out. Still haven't installed my Carr steps, weather not cooperating. My bedrug gets here tomorrow. Got my Noico for the wheelwells and wherever. So still need to order Maxair fan and get a battery and isolator and inverter, wiring, sink and........:eek:gee I gotta lotta stuff to get yet. So the fun begins.
 

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Okay. Is shipping $100 to Austin, Tx? I see the Amazon and ebay prices are with free shipping but figures to be about $12 per linear foot with the free shipping. Do you have 30 feet of the SM600L currently in stock? Also do you have the gasket for the MaxAir fan in stock?
Everything is in stock. Please call Kim [54l.49O.4292] and she can help you with the shipping costs.
 

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If its cost then use Themozite its automotive specific it is much cheaper and still is automotive specific if the money is the issue. 3M is a superior over this product however and worth every penny. Don't get you insulation from a big box store...its not made for automotive use and inferior for this putting in a car.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I ordered the Thinsulate mainly for ease of installation. I knew going in that my van conversion would be spendy and was prepared and it is proving to be so. :| Hope to get it soon.
 

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Yes it seems to have come down to Thinsulate or Polyisocyanurate. The Thinsulate is much more expensive, is easier to install in non-flat areas and where working around obstacles that are an issue like inside the doors, ribs, over the cab etc. The polyiso is much cheaper requires you to buy a $15 progun and a couple of cans of foam and is easy to fit to the reasonably flat areas like the wall cavities and ceiling. The cutting and fitting need not be accurate as the foam makes up the difference. It can be a surface for final finishes such as headliner glued directly to it instead of a second surface like plywood.
I’d suggest anyone thinking about insulating a new van do some of both where each material is used for the part of the van best suited to its strengths.

Both attenuate sound, obviating the need for expensive and esoteric products for that and either can be used to do the whole job meaning either more expensive or more fussing as the choice. I lined many ribs with the polyiso! I’d take the opinion the polyiso can be a better solution for lessening and managing condensation but I don’t think we have enough science on that topic to judge with certainty.

Both these can stand the 160++ temperatures in contact with the van’s exterior Sun heated walls and few other products can, both are rated for vehicle use, both are hydrophobic, neither tend to promote mold, neither contain fibers known to cause respiratory problems or cancer as far as I know.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
I ordered the Thinsulate mainly for ease of installation. I knew going in that my van conversion would be spendy and was prepared and it is proving to be so. :| Hope to get it soon.
Got my Thinsulate today and got it earlier than the estimated delivery date! Thank you Hein. :) A bit too cold today and through the next week so will be waiting for some warmer weather to insulate Ulysses.
 

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Uncle George, my 118 used all 40' I bought, but, I was a bit wasteful tossing scraps away instead of using them in areas to be covered anyway. You might split the difference at 35' to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Uncle George, my 118 used all 40' I bought, but, I was a bit wasteful tossing scraps away instead of using them in areas to be covered anyway. You might split the difference at 35' to be safe.
As per Hein's suggestion,"30 LF would be plenty for your 118", I got 30 feet. ll make it a point to use it wisely. I have windows in the back doors and side door. Thanks for head up.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Got my Thinsulate today and got it earlier than the estimated delivery date! Thank you Hein. :) A bit too cold today and through the next week so will be waiting for some warmer weather to insulate Ulysses.
I got a couple of the black OEM cargo panels off behind the driver's seat and installed the thinsulate on the walls and down in all the crevices. Replaced the panels and I can already tell a difference in the sound just from those two panels. Very pleased.

I was skeptical of the thinsulate but after getting it and getting a good look and feel of it, seems to me to be of the highest quality material and can understand the higher cost. It is very easy to install and not messy. The 3M 90 spray is a really good adhesive and the spray is very well contained to a narrow spray pattern that keeps the stuff off of where you don't want it. Am optimistic about the results when I get the van fully insulated with the thinsulate. It does deaden the sound just hope the 30 feet is enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Okay got some thinsulate installed. I have the full OEM black cargo panels that I am keeping with the thinsulate installed underneath.

Today was a nice warm 68 degree sunny day so took some LaserGrip thermal measurements. On the outside sheet metal of the van the measurement was 113 degrees pretty much from lower to upper panel behind the drivers door.

Inside I took a measurement of the corresponding top black cargo panel that I have not yet installed the thinsulate under it. It measured 91.4 again without thinsulate and just air behind the panel. So those black panels are contributing to some amount of insulation.

I took a measurement of the corresponding bottom black cargo panel that has the thinsulate fully installed underneath it and in all the nooks and crannies and it measured 83.6 degrees. A 7.8 degree drop from non-insulated to insulated. Not sure how accurate and scientific my measuring is and just how effective the thinsulate is compared to other insulation materials. Just was curious. It is what it is.

I will measure outside air temp and inside air temp once I get all the thinsulate installed.
 
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