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@Josh Cissell - Pretty much the same here but I don't use a large water tank either. Have a 5-gal Coleman water jug probably bought over 25 years ago that has never given me a problem. My 2-gal Igloo jug gets refilled every other day so that's never an issue either. Sometimes the 5-gal sits for a week or 2 at a time before having to tap it, and tastes fine but it's usually city/county tap water which likely has both chlorine and fluorine in it. Have found some campground water tastes better (especially here in the southern Appalachians) and I occasionally dump and refill both jugs with it.

Out west was more hit and miss. Where I lived in west central WY had issues with highly alkaline water. Folks with wells out of town usually put in an underground cistern and either hauled or had water delivered to fill it for most home use. It wasn't unsafe to drink exactly (at least in small quantities) but tasted awful. If you showered in well water regularly your hair would get stiff and washing clothes in it did the same, plus it bleached them out fast. We rented a house in town to get water that was filtered and treated up in the canyon, then later bought a house in town just to avoid well water. It was hard to get a loan without good water anyway.
 

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We have 2 jugs under the sink: a 5 gallon fresh water with submersible pump and a 7 gallon Reliance jug for waste water. We don't intentionally drink the water from the sink, it's primarily used for hand washing, teeth brushing and occasional light washing/rinsing of silverware, coffee cups, etc. I treat the 5 gal fresh water with 40 drops of bleach. The van is my wife's daily drive vehicle, and we've left the 5 gallons of fresh water in the van for months at a time through the hot Phoenix summer with no issues.

We don't normally drink tap water at home either, but use filtered water and RO water. For drinking water on a road or camping trip we buy several gallon water jugs from the grocery. On a longer camping trip we would bring one or more 5 gallon jugs freshly filled from the home faucet just before the trip. Those could be used for drinking in an emergency, but mostly get used for washing hands and dishes at camp. For that I have a Hike Crew portable propane shower that I modified with a foot pump for hand/dish washing.

For real SHTF conditions we have a large MSR pump filter that's always in the van. And if we're heading to a backpack trip we have our Sawyer Squeeze in our packs. Living in the desert, everything is planned around water availabiliyt!
 

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City water is treated and most can stay fresh longer than well water. On our recent cross country trip, we had some great water and some that was total trash. We used a Grayl Geopress filter. It was amazing how well it worked and how good it tasted. It is a water purifier. I would drink water from Flint, Mich with it.

 

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I just finished my build, so not much experience with the big water tank yet. So far it's been fine sitting a few months with only occasional use. But I have done years of bike racing, and water bottles would get a bit moldy after a year or two of use. I'd only notice when it started tasting funky, then chuck the bottle cuz I had 10 other bottles.

Mostly just commenting to follow, cuz I'll probably have to clean and sanitize at some point...
 

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Out west was more hit and miss. Where I lived in west central WY had issues with highly alkaline water. Folks with wells out of town usually put in an underground cistern and either hauled or had water delivered to fill it for most home use. It wasn't unsafe to drink exactly (at least in small quantities) but tasted awful. If you showered in well water regularly your hair would get stiff and washing clothes in it did the same, plus it bleached them out fast. We rented a house in town to get water that was filtered and treated up in the canyon, then later bought a house in town just to avoid well water. It was hard to get a loan without good water anyway.
Alkaline water and soil are a common problem in the western US. Ever see any methods to treat it? Looking for options.
 

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Alkaline water and soil are a common problem in the western US. Ever see any methods to treat it? Looking for options.
A couple guys I worked with lived out of town and had cisterns they filled themselves. Another just put up with the water in the house but drank/cooked with bottled water. A regular water filter didn't do much and I don't know if they tried anything else. Of course a reverse osmosis system ($$) should work but many that go that route end up adding minerals for taste since the output is just distilled water.
 

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I did a search on this and did not find the answer. I was wondering if it is really necessary (or strongly recommended) to filter the water used in a very basic water system? My setup is about as simple as you can get:

Refillable plastic water jug pumped with basic Johnson water pump to very basic RV type faucet (see pic below), then drained to grey water tank (or can set it up to just drain right out)

I live in San Francisco and our municipal water is very good and clean, and this is typically the water I will fill the jugs with. I have been drinking unfiltered water here forever and actually prefer it to most bottled water. However, I started thinking that maybe I should buy some sort of simple filtration system and filter it so that any minerals or other contents don't mess up the system over time, and if you do recommend filtering the water, is there a simple system you recommend? The other thought I had was maybe running some diluted distilled white vinegar through the system periodically would be sufficient?

I would be curious to hear thoughts from more knowledgeable and experienced members here. Thanks!

Improved the taste for mine or I should say the water doesnt taste bad .I get water from campgrounds typicaly to refill.The filter was only $30 complete .Alot of full time RV people seem to have them
 

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I did a search on this and did not find the answer. I was wondering if it is really necessary (or strongly recommended) to filter the water used in a very basic water system? My setup is about as simple as you can get:

Refillable plastic water jug pumped with basic Johnson water pump to very basic RV type faucet (see pic below), then drained to grey water tank (or can set it up to just drain right out)

I live in San Francisco and our municipal water is very good and clean, and this is typically the water I will fill the jugs with. I have been drinking unfiltered water here forever and actually prefer it to most bottled water. However, I started thinking that maybe I should buy some sort of simple filtration system and filter it so that any minerals or other contents don't mess up the system over time, and if you do recommend filtering the water, is there a simple system you recommend? The other thought I had was maybe running some diluted distilled white vinegar through the system periodically would be sufficient?

I would be curious to hear thoughts from more knowledgeable and experienced members here. Thanks!

Of course, I attach a filter to the hose I use to fill my water tank. But I also carry a Lifestraw pitcher with two filters. Anything I drink comes from that pitcher. There is so much plastic in our environment that micro-particles are everywhere, including in water. I would never drink bottled water since those bottles are filled with tap water in cities that don't have as good tap water as I have in Oakland. Bottled water is a complete scam and is lower quality in general. As others have mentioned, the biggest risk is to leave water sitting in your tank for a long time. I always drain when I get home and fill and drain and then fill again before a trip. If it has been a while, I use a cup of bleach--let it sit for 2 hours and then drain--and then a cup of vinegar, drain, and then fill and drain one more time before the final fill.
 
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