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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello DIYers

I am considering buying and installing an inverter. This would be an addition to my electrical system, and mostly used for minor kitchen appliances such as a hand held blender, & possibly an induction cooktop but for limited use.

I am thinking of a 2000 Watt continuous output. Not that I need it to be that big, but I am trying to allow for the future. I have some existing duplex receptacles on my kitchen cabinet and I would rewire one of these 120V outlets to the inverter.

I am seeking information of what you have & how you use it and if you are happy with the inverter you have.

The specs (I think I want);

2000 Watts continuous
Pure Sine
Efficiency is important
Max cable size the inverter can take from the battery

Other than that just wanting your recommendations on what is current out there and what will fit my needs.

So here is one requirement - only 300W for my wife's hand mixer "Green Tea Lattes" if you need to know 馃檮
67435
 

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I got one of those $260 2k PSW inverters, 90% efficiency, the idea is to replicate 1 wall outlet. In the van I have used it to run power tools, microwave, water heating element and currently it's running my refrigerator. I also use it to power household appliances during power outages.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I got one of those $260 2k PSW inverters, 90% efficiency, the idea is to replicate 1 wall outlet. In the van I have used it to run power tools, water heating element and currently it's running my refrigerator. I also use it to power household appliances during power outages.
Great thanks !!

can you post the make and model?
 

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Great thanks !!

can you post the make and model?
Eastwood 2000w pure sine wave, I've seen other brands with the same case.
67436
 

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Here are some inverters that will actually operate at 2000 watts and run inductive loads.


Be sure to watch out for the designations difference between "2000 volt amps" that Victron uses and "2000 watts".

A Victron 2000 is really ~ 1500 watt inverter.
 

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Hello DIYers

I am considering buying and installing an inverter. This would be an addition to my electrical system, and mostly used for minor kitchen appliances such as a hand held blender, & possibly an induction cooktop but for limited use.

I am thinking of a 2000 Watt continuous output. Not that I need it to be that big, but I am trying to allow for the future. I have some existing duplex receptacles on my kitchen cabinet and I would rewire one of these 120V outlets to the inverter.

I am seeking information of what you have & how you use it and if you are happy with the inverter you have.

The specs (I think I want);

2000 Watts continuous
Pure Sine
Efficiency is important
Max cable size the inverter can take from the battery

Other than that just wanting your recommendations on what is current out there and what will fit my needs.

So here is one requirement - only 300W for my wife's hand mixer "Green Tea Lattes" if you need to know 馃檮
View attachment 67435
This is the model I have. It's a Kisae 2000W inverter/charger. I bought it from Wegosolar about 3 years ago. Works well to charge from shore power (infrequently) and to run 700w microwave, 1800W induction cooktop and lots of other stuff. I only turn it on to run my AC loads, not my fridge as that's DC.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here are some inverters that will actually operate at 2000 watts and run inductive loads.


Be sure to watch out for the designations difference between "2000 volt amps" that Victron uses and "2000 watts".

A Victron 2000 is really ~ 1500 watt inverter.
Thanks @HarryN

I will review those & watch out for 鈥渧olt amps鈥
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is the model I have. It's a Kisae 2000W inverter/charger. I bought it from Wegosolar about 3 years ago. Works well to charge from shore power (infrequently) and to run 700w microwave, 1800W induction cooktop and lots of other stuff. I only turn it on to run my AC loads, not my fridge as that's DC.

Thanks @ShaunB

I will add this to my review list
 

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Hello DIYers

I am considering buying and installing an inverter. This would be an addition to my electrical system, and mostly used for minor kitchen appliances such as a hand held blender, & possibly an induction cooktop but for limited use.

I am thinking of a 2000 Watt continuous output. Not that I need it to be that big, but I am trying to allow for the future. I have some existing duplex receptacles on my kitchen cabinet and I would rewire one of these 120V outlets to the inverter.

I am seeking information of what you have & how you use it and if you are happy with the inverter you have.

The specs (I think I want);

2000 Watts continuous
Pure Sine
Efficiency is important
Max cable size the inverter can take from the battery

Other than that just wanting your recommendations on what is current out there and what will fit my needs.

So here is one requirement - only 300W for my wife's hand mixer "Green Tea Lattes" if you need to know 馃檮
View attachment 67435
I have used a Samlex SSW-2000-12A SSW Series Pure Sine Wave Inverter - 2000 Watt in my Promaster 3500 ext conversion for five years. It's surge is rated at 4kw and the multispeed fan is pretty quiet unless you have a heavy load on it. Seems like good value. A nice feature is that it comes with a remote that has on/off and shows voltage and a bar graph of load.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Thank You for All Responses;

So after pondering over the type of inverters & the expense of a 鈥渢otal installation鈥 other than labour I decided to go a different route for our cost/benefit & intended use.

So for now, no inverter for us.

One of the biggest 鈥渘eeds鈥 for the inverter was so my wife could operate her 120v hand blender for 2 minutes without Hauling out our Honda generator. We hopefully fixed that need with a 鈥渃ordless hand blender鈥 that charges a lithium battery via 120v. This is the product we just purchased today;

67614




Wait 馃榿 鈥淭here Is MORE鈥

So winter is coming & we like to have a coffee (for him) & a 鈥済reen tea latte with almond milk鈥 (for her) every morning. So on cold or crappy days, we have operated out 60,000 btu burner inside the van with the slider open or a few times closed. 馃ザ

So RD if you are still lurking around 馃槣 you win my friend, as I just ordered this (not sure if I will use butane or propane) but without any experience with these we will eventually figure it out.

67615





So thinking outside the box for our 鈥渘eeds鈥, the best inverter for us is No Inverter; or that is our best conclusion today. We have tried to keep our house battery bank & needs to 12 volt. The idea of the inverter puts further complications and 12 volt strength/strain on our 12volt system (especially for induction loads). Converting 120v to 12v is no big deal & that is why we have an onboard converter/charger. The inverter 12 to 120 is a different animal - if it was not we would heat with 12v inverted to 120v. I鈥檓 not saying it 鈥渃an鈥檛 be done鈥, just I鈥檓 unwilling at this point in time.

Again; thank you all for the inverter information you provided me 鈥渕uch appreciated鈥
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I doubt you will miss the inverter much -- we hardly ever use ours, and could have easily done without it.

Gary
Van #2 I would really consider not installing the 120V AC side all together.
 

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Van #2 I would really consider not installing the 120V AC side all together.
I feel the very opposite. The 120V side is essential for us to power air conditioner, heat, microwave, coffee maker, TV, etc. The 12V side is much easier to do without. When traveling from campground to campground, I don鈥檛 鈥渘eed 12V at all, which is what we did for many years.

I can easily see a very simple battery system that only powers an inverter, and everything inside motorhome being 120V residential down to the lights.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I feel the very opposite. The 120V side is essential for us to power air conditioner, heat, microwave, coffee maker, TV, etc. The 12V side is much easier to do without. When traveling from campground to campground, I don鈥檛 鈥渘eed 12V at all, which is what we did for many years.

I can easily see a very simple battery system that only powers an inverter, and everything inside motorhome being 120V residential down to the lights.
I totally understand what you stated for your needs. As soon as you have electrical heating & air conditioning as essential requirements by my calculations that is 120v shore power or generator.

Last year this time (precovid) we travelled around WA, OR, & Calf. with only a 1500W electric space heater. We would pay for a campsite just to 鈥減lug into鈥 120v for heat.馃ザ

When we returned home I researched, purchased, & installed a propane heater. It still uses 12v for the fan to circulate the heat, but that is easily provided by the house battery bank.

12v loads we have:
roof fan
LED lights
water pump
charge station (usb & cig lighter type)
blower fan on propane heater
fridge

120v loads we would use if available:
space heater (redundant now)
hot water tank
hand blender (redundant now)


120v loads we don鈥檛 have (& probably never will have in the van):
TV
air conditioning
microwave
coffee maker


We have 120v onboard currently;
30amp Shore Power plug
45amp charger / converter
30amp main breaker
2 - 15amp breakers to 2 duplex receptacles
2 - 20amp breakers to 2 duplex receptacles

Now we rarely plug in 120v thus rarely use the 120v side at all now. That is why I thought of installing an inverter, but that is another rabbit hole for me.

We all have different needs. On van #2 I will have some RV experience & have a better idea of what we will want & need. We had zero RV experience when we built van#1.
 

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I totally understand what you stated for your needs. As soon as you have electrical heating & air conditioning as essential requirements by my calculations that is 120v shore power or generator.

Last year this time (precovid) we travelled around WA, OR, & Calf. with only a 1500W electric space heater. We would pay for a campsite just to 鈥減lug into鈥 120v for heat.馃ザ

When we returned home I researched, purchased, & installed a propane heater. It still uses 12v for the fan to circulate the heat, but that is easily provided by the house battery bank.

12v loads we have:
roof fan
LED lights
water pump
charge station (usb & cig lighter type)
blower fan on propane heater
fridge

120v loads we would use if available:
space heater (redundant now)
hot water tank
hand blender (redundant now)


120v loads we don鈥檛 have (& probably never will have in the van):
TV
air conditioning
microwave
coffee maker


We have 120v onboard currently;
30amp Shore Power plug
45amp charger / converter
30amp main breaker
2 - 15amp breakers to 2 duplex receptacles
2 - 20amp breakers to 2 duplex receptacles

Now we rarely plug in 120v thus rarely use the 120v side at all now. That is why I thought of installing an inverter, but that is another rabbit hole for me.

We all have different needs. On van #2 I will have some RV experience & have a better idea of what we will want & need. We had zero RV experience when we built van#1.
Not entirely, although that鈥檚 still the case to be cost effective.

All-electric motorhomes are no longer limited to shore or (conventional) generator power. That鈥檚 where the trend with high-capacity high-cost lithium systems is headed. It鈥檚 still expensive to go all-electric from battery power, but some buyers can and will pay the premium. When an RV is all-electric, it makes it more tempting to try to skip the 12V system, although it鈥檚 not practical yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks @Chance

I understand our needs being much different than you needs especially with air conditionin. If I could get efficient, easy, cost effective 120v out of a 鈥渟tand alone (non shore power or generator 120v supplied) FLA or AGM battery house bank I would be very interested.

I can easily see a very simple battery system that only powers an inverter, and everything inside motorhome being 120V residential down to the lights.
Simply, I can鈥檛 easily see what you described above. Can you elaborate on your statement 鈥渁 very simple battery system鈥? I鈥檓 very interested in what components you would use for this & the specs; batteries, how to replenish them, etc.

The problem(s) I could not overcome was how big the battery bank needed to be, the discharge rate, & the required charge rate to replenish the batteries if even on a daily basis. How would you achieve this?

In 2018 when we built I bought a Victron 12/3000/120 Multi as I wanted to build just what I believe you are describing. For me I went down a rabbit hole & it felt like pushing rope. So if you have product information & technology to build a 鈥渧ery simple battery system鈥 to provide 120v from house batteries that looks after the energy requirements for heat, hot water, & air conditioning along with the minor 12v loads I mentioned above, then please educate me. Then what do you think such a system would cost?

Victron 12/3000/120 specs (Never Installed & I will probably put it in my cabin);
67646




I have seen some posts on here detailing some massive Lithium systems where the costs are more than 50% of what I paid for my new PM in 2018.
 

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Thanks @Chance

I understand our needs being much different than you needs especially with air conditionin. If I could get efficient, easy, cost effective 120v out of a 鈥渟tand alone (non shore power or generator 120v supplied) FLA or AGM battery house bank I would be very interested.



Simply, I can鈥檛 easily see what you described above. Can you elaborate on your statement 鈥渁 very simple battery system鈥? I鈥檓 very interested in what components you would use for this & the specs; batteries, how to replenish them, etc.

The problem(s) I could not overcome was how big the battery bank needed to be, the discharge rate, & the required charge rate to replenish the batteries if even on a daily basis. How would you achieve this?

.....cut....
To me 鈥渟imple鈥 doesn鈥檛 necessarily mean low-cost or lacking in capacity. Maybe semantics, but I鈥檓 thinking that much longer-term RVs will be designed with a very different mindset. Similar to electric cars, you鈥檇 have to start thinking from scratch. Likewise, when battery costs and weight become low enough, I can visualize a much simpler electrical system where a very-high-capacity battery will power an inverter full-time while traveling and camping. The 120V electricity could then power everything in camper, just like in an all-electric residential house.

Or who knows, it could go the other way and end up with a lot of RV-specific Direct Current appliances so that everything gets powered directly from batteries. DC air conditioners and refrigerators are a step in that direction, but with enough cheap and light battery capacity, why bother.

There are already factory camper vans with over 10 kWh of battery capacity, but as batteries get cheaper, I expect that number will increase quickly.

Automotive lithium-battery capacity in some cars are presently priced at $300 per kWh, and weigh 15 pounds per incremental kWh when larger battery can be purchased. At that rate, an extra 10 kWh for $3,000 and 150 pounds would make a lot of sense for those like me who mostly stay in campgrounds with hookups, and don鈥檛 boondock in harsh winter conditions for days at a time. Charging could be at campgrounds once every few days or longer; or in case of plug-in hybrids, while driving. We鈥檙e not there yet but getting much closer to having the option.
 

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