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2017 159" High Roof
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a high-quality Windy nation 1500W pure sine inverter years ago that quit on me today. It basically sat in a box until I started using it in my build. I haven’t stressed it at all. The only thing I used it for was a coffee pot on a camping trip and a battery charger for my tools while I’m working on my build.

I figured it had to be a fuse, so I started taking it apart and called their support line since there were several fuses in there and some were covered in goop and didn’t look like they were meant to be removed. Everything looked normal on display though, and Support said that usually when that happens it means the inverter is defective. It’s well past the warranty period, so I’m not optimistic that they’ll help me out when I email them as he recommended

I have a couple of old cheapie modified sine inverters, and I’m wondering if I should just go that route since pure sine ones are expensive, and I’m not excited about replacing another one if these things normally have a high rate of failure. Not to mention, they take up a lot less space in an already kind of cramped power compartment. I figured that the only AC thing that I would ever run is a coffee pot, but I’m planning to add a microwave and a small water heater.

I’ve heard that with modified sine, it’s not only a matter of whether it will power your devices but if it’ll damage them over the long term. I saw someone once make the analogy of modified sine to driving a car with square wheels. It may get you from A to B but will probably mess you up over the long term.

So, maybe I should just stick to pure sine. Thoughts and recommendations welcome.
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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2,608 Posts
Hi,
I'd stick with sine wave - it seems like its a worthwhile feature, and the price premium over modified sine wave has gone down a lot.
I looked at getting a new inverter a few months back and came to the conclusion that the Samlex stuff looked pretty solid.
Have also had good experience with Tripplite.

Gary
 

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740 Posts
Samlex stuff looked pretty solid.
Samlex does make a decent inverter. Xantrex also makes a fairly priced inverter if you don't need a charger.
 

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2019 Ram Promaster 136 HT Gasser Stealth Work Van Weekend Camper
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I've been using a Trip-Lite : PV2000SC it's been solid for the past 6 years.
I done the math on usage , Over 10,000 hours in 6 years , running key machines x3 grinder , laptop , electric fan , charging power tools , full size shop vac on weekends .
 

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2017 - 2500 159
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I got Renogy 2000W pure sine. It's fairly cheap, but so far been working well. No long term report yet though. Only had it a bit over a year maybe? I've used it the past 4 weeks every day for coffee, running my work computer, and my wife's curling iron. Can also charge my tool batteries. Have to turn it on before turning on / plugging in the load.
 

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2015 Promaster 3500 159 Ext gas silver
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201 Posts
I purchased a high-quality Windy nation 1500W pure sine inverter years ago that quit on me today. It basically sat in a box until I started using it in my build. I haven’t stressed it at all. The only thing I used it for was a coffee pot on a camping trip and a battery charger for my tools while I’m working on my build.

I figured it had to be a fuse, so I started taking it apart and called their support line since there were several fuses in there and some were covered in goop and didn’t look like they were meant to be removed. Everything looked normal on display though, and Support said that usually when that happens it means the inverter is defective. It’s well past the warranty period, so I’m not optimistic that they’ll help me out when I email them as he recommended

I have a couple of old cheapie modified sine inverters, and I’m wondering if I should just go that route since pure sine ones are expensive, and I’m not excited about replacing another one if these things normally have a high rate of failure. Not to mention, they take up a lot less space in an already kind of cramped power compartment. I figured that the only AC thing that I would ever run is a coffee pot, but I’m planning to add a microwave and a small water heater.

I’ve heard that with modified sine, it’s not only a matter of whether it will power your devices but if it’ll damage them over the long term. I saw someone once make the analogy of modified sine to driving a car with square wheels. It may get you from A to B but will probably mess you up over the long term.

So, maybe I should just stick to pure sine. Thoughts and recommendations welcome.
Hi Aaron

I would also encourage you to go with a pure sine wave unit. I've had good luck with this Samlex unit which I bought from Don Rowe five years ago. It comes with a remote on/off switch which also has a display showing load and voltage. It has a multi-speed fan which is virtually silent at low loads but moderate at high loads. I would urge you to keep excellent ventilation for your inverter and other electrical equipment. I use a number of inexpensive and quiet computer fans in my van conversion. Samlex has a full two year warranty.

Bill
 

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Counter point:

If you're really only going to use a simple coffee maker, cheap microwave, and maybe a water heater - you really could just use the square wave. The cost will be somewhere. Those appliances may burn out. The major issue with the modified sine is that it runs hotter. This is why is is definitely not recommended for sensitive electronics (tv, computer, etc - things that already tend to have terrible heat management), but if you're just running heating elements - it may be cheaper and easier to just replace the microwave if it dies. They're (modified sine) also less efficient, if your concerned on battery capacity. If you have nice batteries, maybe baby them with nicer equipment. I recommend oversizing wires used with a cheap inverter (in and out), again because of heat management.

Samlex, magnum, triplite, and xantrex are all strong contenders for the pure sine inverter replacement. Cost is roughly along that order. Pricer to less expensive
 
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