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*Mods, I do not see any threads dedicated to insulation installation techniques; if there is already a thread on this please forgive me and combine if needed.

I have begun insulating my ProMaster with Thinsulate. I bought a 50' roll for total 250 sf.

I've got all of the ribs filled and now I'm wondering about the cavities down low that go below the bed level. I can reach my hand down pretty far in there - should I pack that out with insulation, leave some space, or? Any advice on this?

Also, I'm planning to get 25 sf of 50 mil sound deadening mat to put in random patches on the bigger panels for a little more sound deadening. This will obviously not cover the whole van, just a few places on the roof and on the bigger panels on the sides is the plan.. Any input on if that's worth it?

Photos of area in question, a roof rib about to get the Thinsulate pulled through, and what I'm using to do this install (minus the 3M 90 spray) - Thinsulate roll, cord, a coat hanger cut short with a little hook bent on the end to pull said cord, a bamboo stick for pushing Thinsulate as needed, tape measure, scissors, tape to tape the cord so that the weight of the cord doesn't pull it through and you have to do it all over again, as I did twice, and Coors Banquet beer.
 

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Yes, that's a good video, thanks.

I don't see him discuss those low cavities I'm talking about though.. My hunch is to not pack them out but to go just below the level of the van floor.

Also, regarding my method, I used much wider pieces of Thinsulate to fully pack out the rib cavities, without getting compressed. It took more time / effort to get the pieces in for sure. I got good at gauging what width use use. No needle to thread, I just twisted the end of the Thinsulate and tied it, then cut it off when done. I also threaded the cord all the way first and then pulled it through. I had to use new cord often because it would fray on the metal edges as I had to aggressively pull at times because of my thicker pieces of material, and there are lots of places to get hung up.. So far my cheap - but sharp - scissors are working fine. (I'm cutting black fabric side up.)

Side note, I wish the fabric side of the Thinsulate had lines to help make straight cuts - I've been making marks every foot or so at whatever width I cut but cutting could be made easier..
 

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I started off by putting in 100 sq ft of sound deadening insulation all over the roof and walls and over the wheel wells. That made a huge difference in cabin noise at speed. Then I cut up sheets of 1" Mylar lined foam board and paneled the walls and roof. Used spray foam at the edges and some on the faces to adhere it. Had to prop it up in place as it dried, but I wasn't in a hurry. Then I did a layer of Mylar bubble wrap all over the roof and walls and taped it off with aluminum tape. I stuffed some vertical cavities with pink insulation. Put some pieces of pink inside the door panels as well. Keeps it noticeably warmer now with very little heater input. Even quieter on the road too. Put wood and hardboard panels up on the walls and roof attached to furring strips. Working on the bed platform now.
 

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Listen to MsNomer on the scuppers at the bottom of the van. Little or no insulation is needed below the floor for sure and if you accidentally close off the weep holes water will eventually reside there and that is not good. Rigid insulation board (perhaps 1” Polyisocyanurate) is a good choice for the curved and flat surfaces and is about R-10, enough to temper the effects of cold and sun. Great stuff foam and a pro applicator makes a great adhesive to hold it n place. Lots has been written here about insulation.
 

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Can I revive this insulation post asking for clarification?

I'm about ready to install and would like a nod from the veterans.

Here's my plan:
- Mount 1" polyiso to the sheet metal using 3m 90 spray adhesive
- Seal the edges of polyiso and all rib areas of sheet metal with Great Stuff Gaps and Cracks PRO using pro gun
- Adhere reflectix sheeting to wheel wells and other places polyiso won't fit
- Wood paneling over the top of everything
- Possibly leatherette or other fabric over wood panel in some areas

Does this work as a sound build plan and for long-term protection/insulation? I've seen some people lay Reflectix over the polyiso but am not sure if that is good/proper.
(I'll bring up flooring in a separate thread later and am just talking walls/ceiling here.)
 

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I understand many use the 3M 90 for that purpose. I used the great stuff and a progun as the back adhesive because I know it will hold in hot or cold for a very long time. I have had the 3M 77 or whatever let go in a week. I didn’t want the polyiso to droop EVER. Who knows perhaps that 90 is fine. You are good to go and have a better plan than most. Use the Reflexix where you must. I have used it in AZ to cover windows and am not that fond of it either, it has a lifetime, its plastic.
 

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I understand many use the 3M 90 for that purpose. I used the great stuff and a progun as the back adhesive because I know it will hold in hot or cold for a very long time. I have had the 3M 77 or whatever let go in a week. I didn’t want the polyiso to droop EVER. Who knows perhaps that 90 is fine. You are good to go and have a better plan than most. Use the Reflexix where you must. I have used it in AZ to cover windows and am not that fond of it either, it has a lifetime, its plastic.
I'm planning to do this. Which version of the Great Stuff did you use? There are a few and it's a little confusing which one is best for this purpose.
 

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I understand many use the 3M 90 for that purpose. I used the great stuff and a progun as the back adhesive because I know it will hold in hot or cold for a very long time. I have had the 3M 77 or whatever let go in a week. I didn’t want the polyiso to droop EVER. Who knows perhaps that 90 is fine. You are good to go and have a better plan than most. Use the Reflexix where you must. I have used it in AZ to cover windows and am not that fond of it either, it has a lifetime, its plastic.
Sorry is this ends up being a double post. I submitted a reply already but I'm not seeing it.

I'm planning to do this, too. Which Great Stuff product did you use? I'm confused as to which one would be the most appropriate.
 

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I've tried different types and spent time over thinking it. If you are putting vertical strips on the metal and press the polyiso into it or going around the edge I don't think it matters in the end. Get a lot of panels precut, because when you start you get better and better, just wear gloves, control the flow rate and have bracing ready, it's better to run out foam then panels.
 
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