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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been researching insulation - both thermal and sound deadening for the back of my PM.

This is my plan:

Layer 1. Next to the van wall. Fill all interior spaces with 2 inch thick cotton fiber insulation. Like this:

image by bouteloua, on Flickr
http://www.homedepot.com/p/UltraTouch-48-in-x-75-in-Denim-Insulation-Hot-Water-Heater-Blanket-60301-48752/202710039

Layer 2. A solid cover of reflectix. Between layer 1 and 2 will be any wires or pipes. Like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Reflectix-48-in-x-100-ft-Standard-Edge-Insulation-1-Roll-BP48100/202092205#specifications

Layer 3, A covering layer of Sequentia. This will have outlets for electricity and will not cover any tie downs.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_8566-293-FTSTF.1_0__?productId=3162499&Ntt=frp&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=frp&facetInfo=


I don;t plan to do any insulating until I am certain where the generator and heat pump will go.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Also. I wanted to experiment with the foil lined cotton insulation so I hung it behind my driver and passenger seat. I installed a little plexiglass window.

This was going to just be a very temporary fix to keep the heat and AC in the front part of the PM but it works so well with sound deadening and thermal insulation that I see no reason to take it down. The cotton insulation is 2 inches thick and is foil lined. I draped it behind my seat like a curtain. It does not interfere with the adjustment of the seat.

All of this cost less than $80 and works very well. (2 x $28 for insulation/ $15 plexiglass. plus c clamps and spray glue to install. )

Temporary barrier by bouteloua, on Flickr
 

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Didn't see anything about the cotton/denim insulation's waterproofness. Unless it's specifically treated to repel water I'd be concerned cotton/denim might hold water. Any leak or condensation could be absorbed by the cotton/denim & wicked behind panels.

Would think if it was treated you'd see it featured on the package. EZ enough to test by simply wetting a scrap of the insulation. If water beads up & is repelled it's OK. But if it soaks up water like a sponge I'd look for something else.

Am looking at rolls of flexible closed cell foam. Once used a product called Ethafoam, glued directly to wall skin & covered with cloth.
 

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Was afraid of that. Once looked at something like the cotton/denim insulation as alternative to common itchy fiberglass. It sopped up water like a sponge & got so heavy it sagged.

The cotton insulation flunked the moisture test.
Used cheap common 1" white styrofoam sheets glued directly to wall/roof skin & made up felt backed vinyl Masonite panels to cover it.
 

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styrofoam will suck moisture and mildew. Millions of homeowners with styrofoam involved with class action lawsuit over it. It's been removed from all homes, all along the east coast, where mildew is a problem.
 

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Diesel PM, 2015, 2500 hi-top
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After reading everyone's very informative posts about insulation, here's what might be a good plan for my PM, but need criticism/comments before I start.

For all flat metal areas (cargo walls, but not the ceiling or floor because they're ribbed, including any flat metal in cab area), I will be cutting approx 6" sq sections of this CLD because it deadens sound and is very thin. This isn't for temperature insulation, it's just for sound deadening, only need about 25 percent coverage in strategically noisy areas.
http://store.secondskinaudio.com/damplifier-40-sq-feet-40-damp-20-sheets/

For all the walls and ceiling in the cargo area for temperature insulation (after the rooftop AC and vent are installed), I will be installing this nonwoven Insul-bright material because it doesn't require an air space to be effective (cheaper than Reflectix too), it won't absorb moisture (polyester and metal), it won't fray and can be cut with scissors, and will contour to the many nonflat surfaces.
http://warmcompany.com/ibpage.html
I'll be gluing the Insul-bright with this glue, beading it in tiny strips for every third rib on the ceiling and every 6 inches on the walls
http://www.liquidnails.com/en-US/products/high-temperature-adhesive-LN201
Next layer will be heavy-duty bubblewrap from Sealed Air because I can double-up on the layers for filling cavities and contour to nonflat surfaces, etc. Will use double-sided tape to keep it in place.
Final layer will use Pactiv Extruded Polystyrene Foam Board Insulation because it can be shaped to nonflat surfaces and it doesn't crumble when cut, and I can double-up on it in places where there is extra space for increasing the thickness of insulation.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_304092-210-304092.0_0__?productId=3122451&N=0&catalogId=10051&langId=-1

Final layer, ABS panels, white, viewing the textured side (less glare), 1/16th" thick, with PVC J-trim and division molding to finish the edges.

Would really appreciate comments before I start this huge project!
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Trecilla
\\
Regarding sound insulation: the only time you need that is when you are driving. So a sound deadening "curtain" of several layers of Insul-brite between you and the cargo area will take care of that. When you are stopped, sound deadening is not an issue. Even so, I painted my wheel wells with thick rubberized black paint. Also, all your thermal insulation will help with audio insulation.

I got a whole bolt of Insul-bright off ebay and paid $96 for it. I used it liberally throughout my van conversion and have a bit left over. It is wonderful stuff. The hollow polyester and mylar combo are awesome.

I like the combination of materials you are using for insulation. I would be happy to show you what I did in my van. Mistakes and successes both. I will be in Hondo, Texas heading slowly south and eastward in January. Where are you located?
 

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If you build your bed platform over the rear wheels the sound deadening is a non issue. I didn't even bother with any, just 2" foam board insulation on the walls and 1" on the roof.
 

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After reading everyone's very informative posts about insulation, here's what might be a good plan for my PM, but need criticism/comments before I start.

For all flat metal areas (cargo walls, but not the ceiling or floor because they're ribbed, including any flat metal in cab area), I will be cutting approx 6" sq sections of this CLD because it deadens sound and is very thin. This isn't for temperature insulation, it's just for sound deadening, only need about 25 percent coverage in strategically noisy areas.
http://store.secondskinaudio.com/damplifier-40-sq-feet-40-damp-20-sheets/

For all the walls and ceiling in the cargo area for temperature insulation (after the rooftop AC and vent are installed), I will be installing this nonwoven Insul-bright material because it doesn't require an air space to be effective (cheaper than Reflectix too), it won't absorb moisture (polyester and metal), it won't fray and can be cut with scissors, and will contour to the many nonflat surfaces.
http://warmcompany.com/ibpage.html
I'll be gluing the Insul-bright with this glue, beading it in tiny strips for every third rib on the ceiling and every 6 inches on the walls
http://www.liquidnails.com/en-US/products/high-temperature-adhesive-LN201
Next layer will be heavy-duty bubblewrap from Sealed Air because I can double-up on the layers for filling cavities and contour to nonflat surfaces, etc. Will use double-sided tape to keep it in place.
Final layer will use Pactiv Extruded Polystyrene Foam Board Insulation because it can be shaped to nonflat surfaces and it doesn't crumble when cut, and I can double-up on it in places where there is extra space for increasing the thickness of insulation.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_304092-210-304092.0_0__?productId=3122451&N=0&catalogId=10051&langId=-1

Final layer, ABS panels, white, viewing the textured side (less glare), 1/16th" thick, with PVC J-trim and division molding to finish the edges.

Would really appreciate comments before I start this huge project!

Hi,
I'm not clear on why so many layers? Each layer adds more labor, and it seems like more opportunities for squeaks as it moves? But, I don't really know.

Many, many, many opinions on insulation out there. My 2 cents is that the insulation should provide good R value, should not absorb moisture, and should not let moisture get to the metal van skin where it will condense and cause rust and other problems eventually.

I used polyurethane closed cell spray foam with gaps etc filled with Great Stuff polyurethane foam in cans. Its a messy DIY job, but goes pretty fast and it has high R value and no essentially no moisture penetration.
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Vehicles/PMRV/Insulation/Insulation.htm

The scheme of gluing rigid polyiso foam (or extruded polystyrene) board insulation board to the metal with Great Stuff using props to hold in place while Great Stuff cures, and then filling remaining open areas with Great Stuff also seems good to me, but I've not tried it.

Gary
 
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