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Do it.

When I was first insulating the van, I did not insulate above the cab because I did not yet have the tool to remove the buttons that hold the liner. When I took the ceiling down to install the solar wires, I decided to insulate that area with Thinsulate. It only took a few minutes of riding down the road to realize what a huge difference it makes in the noise level, which I thought was already pretty good.

I did not remove the liner. I just lowered the rear edge of the liner and stuffed the sheet of insulation in. It only took a few minutes for a huge benefit.
 

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I was doing so much insulation at once, and the rest of the van was bare, wasn't sure how much difference it made, but it was something that I completed early on.


After popping the buttons, I had the liner pulled completely out to get the Thinsulate stuffed way down low, almost to the overhead console with the visors. Then put it back in and laid the Thinsulate in for the top part. The lower section was glued in place (3M 90), the top was laid in place, didn't want to mess up the wiring and light fixtures should I need to access it in the future.

Agree with MsNomer though... if you're insulating for noise and/or temperature, don't forget this area.









 

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I thought my van was insulated pretty well. I was humbled this past trip when we found ourselves in 118 degree heat. Any and all exposed metal radiates an unbelievable amount of heat. My overhead area (where Zyzzyx posted the photo above) was blazing hot.
 

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I have the same one as MsNomer, works great. I use masking tape on the bottom of the metal when working on sensitive areas.

I insulated above the cab and storage yesterday, thanks for the inspiration!
 

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Zyzzyx thank you for pointing out that the liner will come out without removing the shelf. I was all set to pull the shelf out and decided to double check what others had done. Much easier!

There are some foam blocks on the liner which make it difficult to insulate the bottom 6" or so without removing it.

I decided to friction fit all the insulation - the liner should hold it in place, and still allow access to the marker lights to replace bulbs if needed.
 

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A bit on a tangent, but can someone recommend a good set of fasteners / clips? Spares and various other applications for fitting panels...
 

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I have that set, but I prefer the metal set like this one:



Mine is a bit different with red handles. The metal is "springier" than the plastic and you can put more force on it. Just the right amount of force and they pop off. I also used some scrap wood for leverage and to protect the foam blocks from getting crushed.

https://www.harborfreight.com/5-piece-upholstery-and-trim-tool-set-99739.html
 

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A bit on a tangent, but can someone recommend a good set of fasteners / clips? Spares and various other applications for fitting panels...
There are many threads with this information. Search the forum for christmas tree fasteners. Ebay and Amazon are typical sources.
 

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I agree. Metals tools work better on these tough little buggers. I have this set and the black metal crow bar is far superior to the plastic ones that just bend without removing the button.
[ame]https://www.amazon.ca/Tresalto-Auto-Trim-Removal-Tool/dp/B01L8GHB7O[/ame]
But the plastics one have come in handy for other things.
 

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Removal of plastic christmas trees:

I've found that rocking them slightly side-to-side while leveraging them with your tool of choice allows a few "branches" at a time to come out on each side. I kept using my tool and having to apply so much force so that when they did release they would POP out and fly to unknown parts only to be found while cleaning up. Since I started rocking them out they are in much better condition for reusing also. Protect the surrounding surface from your tool so you don't mar it like I did.


Re: post 12
I replaced the headliner buttons with rivnuts so I can easily remove the headliner to add or modify as planned for the future. Wellnuts are an easy alternative to rivnuts and only a screwdriver is needed to install.
 

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Glad to find this thread as I was dreading pulling those out. Just ordered the pliers.
 

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Glad to find this thread as I was dreading pulling those out. Just ordered the pliers.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003WZRLZ2?tag=vs-auto-convert-amazon-20
This tool worked great, popped out all the fasteners on the door panel in ten minutes, and yes, they fly! I mainly got it for the headliner, that's next on the Thinsulate schedule. It's a cheaply made Chinese tool, as noted up-thread; at one point I grabbed the Channellocks, straightened one of the tips and kept right on going. It's important to get "full purchase", it seems, to avoid bending the tip. Worth the $16 or 17 (Amazon) for sure. I'm sure there's a pro quality tool, but for the one time van builder (I hope) this is perfect, imho.
 

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Harbor Freight has the same tool for a third of the price and I can confirm it makes the pop rivets a breeze. Without this tool I think I would've been cursing each one and probably would not have had as much success. All told it was a 30 minute job to remove the headliner, run Thinsulate down to the windshield, fill all the side crevices, and get the headliner back installed. Didn't run into a single issue, which is unusual! Don't bother using plastic trim tools. The pliers are worth the cost.

This weekend we got our entire cabin insulated, sound deadened, and stereo upgraded. I'm stoked!
 
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