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Rivnuts thru the floor or just cut a piece of ¾" ply to fit on the floor under the seat and screw the inverter to it. A little construction glue should help hold it n place.
 

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My driver's seat has a very handy factory bin under it are you removing that?
 

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My 2015 built in February of 2015 has the removable plastic bin under the driver's seat. I bet the actual structural seat base has not changed since the Promaster was introduced, so it might be possible to order the bin as a part. It simply snaps into place. Another thought: If you can find a van at your dealer with the bin you could try it in yours before ordering the part.
 

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I did buy the interior convience package with the parcel tray overhead so perhaps that tray is part of that, I thought they all had it.
 

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How do I anchor it?
MsNomer, I know that you decided how to anchor your inverter long ago, but for anyone else asking the question . . . here is what I did. My 2000W inverter is just long enough to sit on top of the the ~3/16" horizontal rods at the front and back of the seat base. I made a couple of clamp plates (see picture) to secure it from the bottom. The fact that it is off the floor should help with cooling and cleanliness. It seems sturdy and it was a reasonably quick attachment method.

I discovered when I opened the box that my CNBOU inverter came with cables that appear to be under-sized for a 2000W inverter. Each cable is comprised of two small (6 AWG?) cables (so, roughly equivalent to a single 3 AWG cable). From what I have read each red wire should really be fused separately, but they are not. (Hopefully, this is not an indication of low-quality parts or poor design inside the inverter . . . we'll see . . . .) I'm half-way through the installation, but I'm going to stop and get some heavier-gauge cables and a fuse. I've been going in circles for hours looking at various sources online, but I think I have settled on 1/0 cable 24" long with a 325A fuse. That should keep the voltage drop to ~2% or less.
 

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2014, 138WB, High Roof, Gas, SW MT
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MsNomer, I know that you decided how to anchor your inverter long ago, but for anyone else asking the question . . . here is what I did. My 2000W inverter is just long enough to sit on top of the the ~3/16" horizontal rods at the front and back of the seat base. I made a couple of clamp plates (see picture) to secure it from the bottom. The fact that it is off the floor should help with cooling and cleanliness. It seems sturdy and it was a reasonably quick attachment method.

I discovered when I opened the box that my CNBOU inverter came with cables that appear to be under-sized for a 2000W inverter. Each cable is comprised of two small (6 AWG?) cables (so, roughly equivalent to a single 3 AWG cable). From what I have read each red wire should really be fused separately, but they are not. (Hopefully, this is not an indication of low-quality parts or poor design inside the inverter . . . we'll see . . . .) I'm half-way through the installation, but I'm going to stop and get some heavier-gauge cables and a fuse. I've been going in circles for hours looking at various sources online, but I think I have settled on 1/0 cable 24" long with a 325A fuse. That should keep the voltage drop to ~2% or less.
Hi,
The inverter should have a max current of about (2000 watts)/(12 volts)(0.9 efficiency) = 185 amps.

BlueSea has a nice calculator for estimating the wire size: http://circuitwizard.bluesea.com/

Putting in 185 amps, 4 ft total wire length, 2% voltage drop, and 90C insulation on the wire, the calculator comes up with 0 AWG.
In the "Explain Results", it says the 4 AWG would be OK for the voltage drop, but 0 AWG is required for ampacity (wire overheating).
So, the 1/0 wire should be fine if you go that way.

Lowes is an easy local source for this kind of wire -- they sell it off spools and cut it to the length you want -- the price per ft is high, but you only end up buying as much as you need. Its stranded, but still hard to bend in these heavy wire gages. Some people like to use welding cable as the finer strands make it easier to bend.

The positive side wire that goes to the battery should have a fuse that is located as close to the battery as possible.

Gary
 

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Hi,
The inverter should have a max current of about (2000 watts)/(12 volts)(0.9 efficiency) = 185 amps.

BlueSea has a nice calculator for estimating the wire size: http://circuitwizard.bluesea.com/

Putting in 185 amps, 4 ft total wire length, 2% voltage drop, and 90C insulation on the wire, the calculator comes up with 0 AWG.
In the "Explain Results", it says the 4 AWG would be OK for the voltage drop, but 0 AWG is required for ampacity (wire overheating).
So, the 1/0 wire should be fine if you go that way.

Lowes is an easy local source for this kind of wire -- they sell it off spools and cut it to the length you want -- the price per ft is high, but you only end up buying as much as you need. Its stranded, but still hard to bend in these heavy wire gages. Some people like to use welding cable as the finer strands make it easier to bend.

The positive side wire that goes to the battery should have a fuse that is located as close to the battery as possible.

Gary
Thanks Gary!

After spending more time in the internet wormhole, I decided to go with 2/0 cable and a 400A fuse. That may be overkill, but it should allow the inverter to get enough current for a 4000W surge with a minimal voltage drop. As you said, the ampacity of the wire is the limiting factor (and the indicator for fuse size).

FWIW: The best deal I found for wire, with attached lugs, was from Temco Industrial.
 

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A few more pictures from my installation . . . .

The 2/0 wire was a challenge to route to the battery. That size is probably over-kill, but I shouldn't have to worry about overheating. I had to cut out some parts of the battery cover (3rd picture) to get it to close. (I also installed a trailer harness and a 2 AWG wire for a hydraulic pump, so the battery box is packed with quite a few wires.) The inverter wire is connected to a 400A Mega fuse, which is hidden under the cover. The big ANL fuse holder is for the line to the hydraulic pump. I included a "before" picture too.
 

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