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Discussion Starter #1
I know that the 1500 136" Hitop gasser is rated to carry 3,750.

I also know that there are safety margins built into all such ratings.

My questions are two:

1- How bad would it be to load 2250 pounds into a 1500 Hi-top? What shape would that 'bad' take if present (e.g. along the continuum of 'if you do it once you'll likely break a spring' to 'prolly not great over time to do regularly')?

2- Would it be useful to/worth shifting some of the weight forward to the front passenger area? Hoping to carry two pallets of soil, each around 1125 pounds, but could pretty easily shift a few hundred pounds to the front seat area.

Thanks in advance for any guesses,

:)PP
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oops, typo. Should read 2 pallets at 2,125 pounds each, rather.
:)PP
 

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I’d take two trips.
 

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2250 x 2 = 4500
4500 - 3750 = 750

750# + driver weight, etc. over the rated payload sounds like a bad idea. You might get away with it, but it could be dangerous or expensive. I drove my previous van once with a few hundred pounds more than it was rated for and the handling was odd and the braking distance was long. I worried the whole way.
 

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2016 136WB low roof diesel, converted to an RV by Sportsmobile, TX
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It's called "safety factor" for a reason

It's called "safety factor" for a reason - if you eliminate the safety factor, you aren't safe anymore. Could the van hold more? Yes, under perfect conditions, like bone dry pavement with no bumps or humps, no grade, no need to make sudden stops, etc. But let it drizzle, let there be a pothole or a washboard, let there be a hill, let some soccer mom turned around to yell at her feral fornication fruit in the back drift into your lane, and suddenly you don't have enough grip, enough springs, enough engine, or enough brake to take care of business. AND, when your insurance finds out (and the WILL find out) that you were overloaded, your claim will be denied and your policy canceled.
 

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I agree with the above but I wonder about the reference to the denial. I have liability insurance on all my vehicles and it is the most expensive part of the coverage. My understanding is that you are liable for the damages if you are negligent in some way. Negligence is determined if one failed to act as a “reasonable” person might. To overload the vehicle one may not be acting as a reasonable person and so may be negligent if that overloading was a contributing factor in the damage. This would make the person liable for the damages I expect. Wouldn’t my liability insurance cover the damages? If not, what am I paying for?
I also have collision insurance so if I collide with something (which seems to be likely to be my fault in most cases) then it pays my damages. Wouldn’t that still work.
If my damage is paid for by this and the other person’s is paid for by the liability what is denied?
You are right they will cancel your coverage AFTER the fact, but they often do that after any accident.
Perhaps a member lawyer could clarify what is wrong with my thinking.

None of this is to condone overloading the van.
 

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No comments on the issue of potential liability. But common sense tells me if I am acting in a way to exceed my or my equipment limits, whether it's a table saw, a Corvette, a boat or a gun, then I need to stop, take a step back and redirect my actions. My personal code of morality rules my action.

I have, when young and stupid, driven overloaded vehicles when on jobs, and still remember the gut wrenching feeling of loosing a set of rear duals on the highway, and of not being able to stop or steer safely, wondering if I was the only one I would injure that day. Not worth it. Even 40 years later.

Make two trips, get a trailer, have it delivered.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Let me play Devil's advocate for a second. :rolleyes:


What are the actual physical differences between a 1500, 2500, and 3500?

It's been a while since I looked at detail specs, but recall that with exception of some of the lightest and shortest PMs, they had the same axles, brakes, wheels, tires, etc. I mostly recall the rear springs being significantly lighter. Is that not the case?

From engine and transmission standpoint, it shouldn't really matter that much because it's still below GCWR. If you got a trailer like someone suggested, at least the drivetrain would have to work even harder.

The structure would be a major concern if built differently, but based on weights I seriously doubt Fiat uses heavier sheet metal for a 2500 vs 1500, as an example. I may be wrong, but it would seem rather expensive to use different gauges of metal to save a few pounds.

So other than rear springs maybe bottoming out easier, is there really much that really makes this an outrageous proposition?

Lastly, if loaded just right, sometimes the GVWR can be exceeded without even exceeding either axle rating, which would then likely not exceed spring ratings either.

And while playing Devil's advocate, let's not forget a bunch of guys have removed rear leaf springs to lower and or soften the ride, without really knowing what effect that has on load-carrying capacity. It's assumed the bump stops will just make up the difference if needed, like when hitting a bump.


>:D


P.S. -- I would not do it myself, mostly because of liability, but I doubt it would hurt the van if loaded right and driven normally/sensibly.
 
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