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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm pretty new to electrical, and the learning curve is pretty steep. I've figured out a pretty solid wiring diagram, and now I'm moving on to understanding the smaller details of wire connections.

What is the best way to connect smaller gauge wire (22-18) coming from appliances (lights, fridge, pump, fan, etc. for example) to larger gauge duplex wire runs (14-10) coming from the switch panel/fuse box? Single crimp heat shrink butt splices? Double crimp butt splices with a piece of heat shrinking covering the connection? I would have to use step-down butt splices. Is there another mechanism besides step-down butt splices that will allow connection of differing gauge wire? Not sure the relative advantage of each, or whether another way of making these connections that is better.

Also, what's the best way to splice into a "run" of duplex wire? Say I wire a run along the ceiling for my 8 overhead lights. How do I splice into the +/- for each light and run more duplex wire along the ceiling to each light fixture?

Thanks!!
 

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This is all low voltace DC with low current. Just twist them together. NO not really. You can terminate the heavy wire at the first bulb and run small gauge stranded wire to the others. I like solder and heat shrink tubes or those crimp fasteners where I might need to separate the wires later. Those are generically called SPADE terminals although technically only the spade shaped ones are. Female spade terminal is a misnomer, (not a MsNomer.)
 

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Crimp, solder and heat shrink. Get some non-insulated butt splice connectors. The size depends on the number of wires that you want to splice. Crimp the connector just enough to hold the wires in place, and solder. A soldering gun is the preferred tool here. Then cover the splice with heat shrink tubing. You will want to use a longer piece of tubing than shown in the pictures. Don't forget to slide the tubing on the wire before crimping and soldering.:D
 

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Maybe this for your last Question?
[ame]https://www.amazon.ca/Bestgle-Connectors-Self-Stripping-Solderless-Electrical/dp/B071W2Z2FW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1513658904&sr=8-9&keywords=wire+connectors[/ame]

In my opinion respectfully is that with the proper connectors (male and female) is to have a proper crimp and is done.
They have the isolators built on the connector.

So in other words is that there is no need for solder (which is corrosive with flux and has a hard breaking point).
And no need for heat shrink, but good to have for that extra insurance.

Aircrafts do the crimping thing with no solder. But with high end crimpers. So basically crimp/done crimp/done (fast).
 

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Aircrafts do the crimping thing with no solder. But with high end crimpers. So basically crimp/done crimp/done (fast).
Aircraft tend to use crimp because it's faster and more fool proof.

They are (potentially) both acceptable.

(I'm certified by my company for both crimp and solder work on aircraft. ;) )
 

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Aircraft tend to use crimp because it's faster and more fool proof.

They are (potentially) both acceptable.

(I'm certified by my company for both crimp and solder work on aircraft. ;) )
What do you use for flux? Special solder?

I just learn from a helicopter video. I am by no means qualified. Open minded.

What kind of crimper?
 

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Maybe this for your last Question?
https://www.amazon.ca/Bestgle-Conne...id=1513658904&sr=8-9&keywords=wire+connectors

In my opinion respectfully is that with the proper connectors (male and female) is to have a proper crimp and is done.
They have the isolators built on the connector.
Not trying to star an argument here, but I can't tell you the number of times that I have seen this type of "T" connector fail. If the slot in the tap portion is not sized properly for the wire diameter that you are using, it either cuts some of the strands, or doesn't bond properly at all.
Also, if you use a good 60/40 resin core electronic grade solder, I've never had any problems with corrosion.
 

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Not trying to star an argument here, but I can't tell you the number of times that I have seen this type of "T" connector fail. If the slot in the tap portion is not sized properly for the wire diameter that you are using, it either cuts some of the strands, or doesn't bond properly at all.
Also, if you use a good 60/40 resin core electronic grade solder, I've never had any problems with corrosion.
No Argument. Open critical thinking and learn from others.

Is it possible you use the wrong size or quality? There are many brands and such. I have used solder and heat shrink not
to long ago. But thought I would share what I learned.

To me it is much better to crimp and go unto the next and so on. No need for solder in my opinion.

Just suggesting for the OP. For someone with no electrical experience, wouldn't it be better for OP to do the simplest way?
 

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Just suggesting for the OP. For someone with no electoral experience, wouldn't it be better for OP to do the simplest way?
Probably. The only problem is that most people with no electrical experience buy a crimper kit at the local "SprawlMart" that is made as cheap as you could possibly get. Just plain junk in my opinion. You need to buy quality connectors, and the crimper tool to go with them from Ideal, or Thomas & Betts, etc.
 

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Probably. The only problem is that most people with no electrical experience buy a crimper kit at the local "SprawlMart" that is made as cheap as you could possibly get. Just plain junk in my opinion. You need to buy quality connectors, and the crimper tool to go with them from Ideal, or Thomas & Betts, etc.
Yes agree! The cheap Walmart crimpers will not cut it. Total junk! I have a medium grade from Canadian Tire (Mastercraft).
 

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What do you use for flux? Special solder?

I just learn from a helicopter video. I am by no means qualified. Open minded.

What kind of crimper?
Nothing special on the solder and flux. Typically just rosin core solder and paste flux. But we don't solder much - basically never for 'normal' will connections. It's itself for whacky things that most people never do - j hooks and such.


I don't know the brands we typically have, but they're the types with exchangeable dies. Just as importantly, the terminals are high quality and can be inspected, and quality wire strippers that don't knick and remove the proper amount of insulation.

https://workmanship.nasa.gov/lib/insp/2 books/links/sections/201 General Requirements.html

Good reference:
https://standards.nasa.gov/file/2615/download?token=jcZ-qz2k
 

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The correct method is - BOTH WAYS. There isn’t necessarily any one way is best. Each situation requires the solution that works the best way to solve the problem. I use both the crimp and the solder methods and, yes, even RD’s twist and wire nuts. It all depends on what your are trying to do.

If you are going to use solder it's important to use rosin core (electrical type solder) and flux and, of course, shrink tubing over the joint.
 

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most Ham Radio equipment works on 12V, Anderson Power Pole has become the connectors of choice. Options are limitless, and it avoids connection errors. KG5BMK 73 .
 

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In fact if you have rosin core solder (pick a small diameter) you do not need any additional flux. Don't use acid flux or liquid flux for sheetmetal, or that for water pipes as it will corrode the wire. They are cleaned off by the water inside the pipe and the plumber cleans outside the pipe. Your soldered wire joints should never get wet so they cannot have those types of flux. Traditionally soldered and wrapped wire connections were the best one could do. They may still be. Don't forget to pull the heat shrink tube on the wire before connecting it then slide it over the cooled splice and heat it to protect the wire.
 

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