Ram Promaster Forum banner

101 - 120 of 131 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #101
having used both extensively, it’s not even close, lol, the ergonomics, stability, trigger, visibility of the blade are all better on the Bauer/ harbor freight.
I,will have to take your word on it as I do not have experience with the HF saw.

Next time I’m in the USA I will take a look. One of the huge factors to performing good work is good tools - makes a huge difference in the outcome.

Thanks for your endorsement ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I,will have to take your word on it as I do not have experience with the HF saw.

Next time I’m in the USA I will take a look. One of the huge factors to performing good work is good tools - makes a huge difference in the outcome.

Thanks for your endorsement ?
One thing I cannot say is how durable it is. I've treated it pretty gently and it feels pretty solid. I know my Bosch has been dropped from heights I figured would have damaged it and it is still a workhorse. My recommendation is a bit more for the ergonomics, battery, power and precision.

I think Bosch is a german company and often they are well engineered but with less focus on ergonomics. All tool companies from so called 'premium' brands to the cheaper store brands have varied widely over the years, though Makita has always been pretty consistent and I think they are still an independent company so maybe that helps. Milwaukee, and other brands have been bought and sold by conglomerates and I think a few models get a little junky in some of their line though almost all their stuff is solid. It's always worth checking Boltr's youtube for tool info. Another tool I really like is my Hitachi job site table saw.



Here's boltr Ave channel

Hitachi saw Hitachi C10RJ 10" 15-Amp Jobsite Table Saw with 35" Rip Capacity and Fold and Roll Stand - - Amazon.com

The hitachi is just a touch finicky. Setup and tuning aren't hard but the fence can get bumped and moved. It's easy to move around, awesome legs and wheels, and a total beast. Good for garages because you can fold it way, but it is still solid as **** when set up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
Does this thread include building gadgets?

My kids got me one of these years ago. Very handy center punch, especially for light materials like the sheet metal in the ProMaster. Made in USA and less than $10.


61234


It is basically a short end, a long end and a spring connecting them. Hold the short end tightly where you want the divot, pull the long end back, and let it go. Perfect center punch divot for starting a drill every time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #108
Does this thread include building gadgets?

My kids got me one of these years ago. Very handy center punch, especially for light materials like the sheet metal in the ProMaster. Made in USA and less than $10.


View attachment 61234

It is basically a short end, a long end and a spring connecting them. Hold the short end tightly where you want the divot, pull the long end back, and let it go. Perfect center punch divot for starting a drill every time.
Thanks Baxsie

That is what I used in my van build “Aviation Quality Tool”.

I used a lot of aviation build tech/tools as building airplanes is another hobby of mine, and the tools & some build techniques are well, just better. You have used this punch so you know. If you are interested in other aviation tools for Van Building here is the tool manufacturer. They are in Spokane.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #109 (Edited)
Yes, some pretty good stuff for pretty cheap, most of the time. Also . . . some dung . . . just got some titanium bits and they were horrible . . . they went back.
If you want quality aviation drill bits look to the aviation industry


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,596 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
. . . building airplanes is another hobby of mine . . .
I assume an RV8? I got to ride in a friend's RV6 -- fun little plane.

. . . the tool manufacturer. They are in Spokane.
Wow, I had no idea. I could about throw a rock from here :)

Not surprisingly, there is another listing labeled "Noxon":

The first link is labeled "Spring Tools" I the second link is labeled "Noxon", I wonder if it is actually the same tool with a 50% markup for the Noxon brand.

If you want quality aviation drill bits look to the aviation industry
LOLs, no, I wanted cheap bits that I could abuse and toss. But those HF ones were not holding up at all, even in "I'm not abusing them" conditions (drill press, correct speed, mild steel).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Didn't know what I was missing all those years using bargain store drill bits. Cheap ones work OK in wood, but really suck in metal. These are spendy but they cut effortlessly and super fast in metal and travel a lot less. They stay sharp longer too. I'm hooked.
Milwaukee SHOCKWAVE IMPACT DUTY Titanium Drill Bit Set (15-Piece)-48-89-4630 - The Home Depot
I bought 2 of those bit sets for our impact drill at work. They are good bits, but I noticed that using them on even sheet metal dulls them quickly. I picked up a few sizes of the Milwaukee Cobalt bits and they are fantastic for metal. The downside is they didn't have the cobalt bits with the quick disconnect shanks. But they are fine for the drill press and standard chuck cordless drill. So, no worries.
I also picked up a set of the cheap bits from HF for my impact at home and they are complete crap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #114
I assume an RV8? I got to ride in a friend's RV6 -- fun little plane.
Actually a 7 & a Super Cub

The name RV8R?. Well, it was meant to mean “RV Renovator

My wife has been wanting us to get a RV “recreational vehicle“ for about 15 years, and I finally gave in to, the idea of a PM DIY (cost/benefit).

So for years before the Van, when going on a trip we would chat “what do you want to take?? The RV?” Now that is just confusing.

RV stands for “Richard VanGrunsven”. Who is also nicknamed “Van” ,,, So our RV planes are also called Vans. So even that can get outta hand. As far as we know only one of our ”Vans” is aerobatic (& we don’t plan on testing the PM).

We love both of our Vans ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #115 (Edited)
I have lots of 20LB propane tanks

I’m going to buy some of these for my tanks. When I pay per “fill” not per lb I like to drain my tank & this will also help me unsure I get a specified “fill”.

Good video on this page showing how they work;



edit; reading the reviews, a common complaint is (as these magnetically attach to the bottom of the tank - standoffs or base shims need to be placed on the bottom of the tank to raise the base about 1” so the sensor will fit), these standoffs tend to fall off. My idea is to put the 20lb tanks in milk crates & shim up the bottom of the tank with plywood spacers to allow clearance between the sensor and milk crate bottom (no fall off - no wrecking the sensor)



63146
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Discussion Starter #116

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
I was doing some welding . . . which on the van means angles:

65560


So I dug out my iGaging AngleCube (bought in 2012):


65561


and my iGaging Digital Protractor (also 2012):

65562


These make short work of accurate angles.

The iGaging AngleCube is good for telling relative angles . . . you can zero it on one piece, then stick or hold it to another piece and see the difference in angle.

I use the iGaging Digital Protractor in lots of ways -- but one of the most useful is accurately setting the angle on my cheapo Harbor Freight band saw. Don't forget to use a coupon :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have a different brand angle cube that shows inches per foot as well that I use to level my camper for more comfortable sleeping. The wheelbase is about 13 feet, the track is about 6 feet and my leveling blocks are 3/4" so once I have the inches per foot of slope front to back or side to side it a simple multiplication to determine the number of blocks to put under the low wheels.

In a level camp site it's usually 2 blocks under the front wheels to get it level enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
TPMS with no install:

I got one of these Favoto TPMS Car Tire Pressure Monitoring System Solar Power . .



The thing I like about it is that it shows all four tires all the time, has user adjustable high, and low limits, and an audible alarm that is loud enough to get your attention. No wires or batteries are needed in the display -- it has a self-adhesive solar panel that you just stick onto the inside of the front window.

There is also no "install" or pairing. Just take off the valve cap and put the correct sensor (with a fresh battery, see below) in its place:



They do vent a small amount of air when putting them on and off, so after setting the tire pressure, spin them on quickly.

You will also want to order some fresh, brand name, CR1632 batteries, from my experience and reviews the batteries shipped in the wheel sensors are cheap or dead. Changing the batteries is not a big deal. You snap off a little indexing washer, then use the included wrench to screw the sender out of the cap. Then slide the new battery in, screw the cap back on the sender, reinstall the indexing washer and you are good to go. I did not mess around with the locking nut . . . the senders are not worth anything without the display.

It is nicely visible in the day and night -- although my prescription polarized sunglasses make it black -- requiring a head tilt or peek over.

As you drive at speed the tire pressure will change. I set my pressures at 60 using the inflator gauge, and cool they show up at 58~59, going down the road they will get to 65.

The display also shows temperatures . . . but since the sensor is outside of the wheel and in fast-flowing air I do not rely on them for accurate tire temperature. Handy for getting the outside temperature in the morning without turning on the key ;-)
 
101 - 120 of 131 Posts
Top